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2424-1 vs. 3650

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  • 2424-1 vs. 3650

    I have a chance to pick up a 2424-1 for about $350.00. Would this be worth it versus the $600.00 I'll spend at Home Depot for the 3650? What are the major differences between the two. One of my concerns is the amount of table space in front of the blade so I can use panel cutting jigs, etc. I didn't think about this when I bought my little craftsman, and I already regret buying it. I'm not a pro, but I have quite a bit of free time, and a lot of furniture my wife wants built. I went cheap with my Crafstman, and it was a waste of money.

    Thanks for the help,

    Tom

  • #2
    I have never used the 2424, I do own the 3650. I love it. I have made a large sled to handle cross cuting. There is plenty of room on the front of the table, this was not the case with my older saw. I think it works better and is much safer.
    SCWood

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    • #3
      Tom----Believe you'll find the 2424-1 doesn't have the micro-adjust rear trunion---but could be wrong. The 2424 fence was not the best (according to several mag' reviews) but some people report good luck with it. But, for $350---you could add an after-market fence and be at the same price as the 3650, with a fantastic fence. I have an older Craftsman version and it's still going strong---good Emerson motor as well.

      As to the 3650, there's a lot of praise here, but there are also a number of problems reported----try a search for details on flexing and motor problems (motor no longer made by Emerson).

      Frankly, the 3650 is a totally new saw, with issues---the 2424 design has been used by Emerson for years---they just kept improving it.
      Dave

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      • #4
        I have the 2424, would not trade it for a 3650. $350 is a nice price if it isn't badly abused, or left to rust.

        My trunion has micro adjust features using an allen wrench. Not the easiest of tasks, but seldom needs adjusting.

        As far as the fence, it is a very solid unit. Jake once posted that you could lift the saw by the fence after locking it into position, but did not recommend doing so.

        As for panel cutting, if your ripping 8' long sheets, short of a European saw it will take some doing to perfecting exacting first time cuts. Click the link in my signiture and scroll to the bottom of the Tour the Shop section. I use dual fences for all sheet goods for precision first time cuts in any panel goods.
        John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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        • #5
          There seems to be a lot of support on these boards for the 2424, must be pretty good. I've bought the 3650 recently and haven't had any problems with it.
          The leg flex was less than the Jet or Powermatic contractors I had looked at. (it wasn't much of an issue with their's either) I can't explain why a few owners suffered with this problem.
          As for the motor I pulled the fan cover B/4 running the saw and the fan showed no significant run out. Rewired for 240v and finished assembly.
          Another common complaint had to do with the clearance of the fence over the top and wings, again no problem on mine.
          On first run there was excess vibration, not from the motor, from the blade. With the belt off the motor ran very smoothly. Put a new blade on and that problem was also solved. I guess I'm just lucky but my 3650 seems a very good value.
          Accurate, minimal run out, quiet, and for a contractor saw excellent dust collection with only a shop vac based collection system.
          A BIG relief because there was plenty of depessing information on being kicked around these boards.

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          • #6
            I bought the 2424 1 with a big price break at HD (it was a floor model) because it was missing some parts. I got it home...called RIGID and they sent the parts FED EX (had them on second day after calling) and, I gotta tell ya, the fence is absolutely fantastic....extremely smooth and accurate. Herculift base is perfect for my little shop where things are crowded and have to be moved. I've cut full sheets of ply on it with no problems at all. I made a sled that is perfect for smaller stock. The blade guard can be removed with on thumbscrew twist and when replaced, doesn't have to be re aligned. Mine has the micro adjustment...but once I tuned the table & blade...I haven't needed to adjust anything. I did buy a WoodWorker II (Forest) blade which makes for smooth cuts (and quiet) and thin kerf.
            I say...GET THE 2424....you won't regret it.
            Don

            [ 12-04-2003, 04:04 AM: Message edited by: don2laughs ]

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            • #7
              Woody,

              do you have rails from two saws mounted on your saw? How did you seam the rails together? I have a set of 2412 rails that are not being used and I suppose I could put them on my saw along with the 2424 rails.

              Another question, how do you use the dual fence system for cutting large sheets? Do you run the panel between the two fences? Wouldn't that be asking for kickback?

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              • #8
                Thanks for the replies, they were all very helpful. I should have my saw in a week or so, and I look forward to more of your insight when I get it.

                Does anyone have a good resource for beginning woodworkers? I get most of my info from TV (New Yankee Workshop, various programs on DIY). They are helpful, but I lack knowledge on joint construction, and in particular, wood movement. I've heard of people building things that self-destruct, with humidity and temperature changes. I'm using primarily plywood so far, so I'm not too concerned, but I plan on moving to hardwoods soon.

                Thanks again for the help,

                Tom

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                • #9
                  Hi Tom, if you are in Kitchener, you should check out the woodworking course offered at Conestoga College. They are offered as continuing education and are 3 hours per week for 12 weeks. They have one of the best facilities in Canada. I'm in Kitchener and I took some of the courses there. They are beginner oriented and you will learn a lot of useful things such has properties of wood, joinery, safety, etc.

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                  • #10
                    www.taunton.com for excellent books and publications.

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                    • #11
                      Best way to learn is to get into projects. And DO. DO. DO. Nothing beats the feeling of wood in hand. You can buy plans online, but From visiting my local library, I learned that almost all of them are from WOOD magazine or something similar. I ordered woodworking magazine, and WOOD mag. I heard that SHOPNOTES is great for building JIGS. That seems to be key to building nice furniture with less errors. Get a couple subscriptions, always have new ideas. Their plans are very detailed as well. If you have a library near, they probably have past dated magazines. Have 10 years worth of wood magazine by me.


                      Good Luck
                      Jake

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                      • #12
                        Idlehands - glad to hear it was a "Big Relief" and really think if you just sift thru the dust as posted you'll find that it comes from maybe one "board" cut, er production run.......if someone actually knew how to set-up a thread linking just real owners and not the "non-users and store observers" I think you'll find nary a beef.
                        Of course, due to circumstances we'd also need to have a way to verify they actually own to qualify to post [img]tongue.gif[/img] [img]tongue.gif[/img]
                        Need to keep the rotten wood away from the good wood .... maybe termites they say
                        Wish I had the answers ..... even half of \'em

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                        • #13
                          Cranky, it's official, you know how to
                          "read between the lines" .

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