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  • Just picked up my TS3650 - what do I need to get

    Hi all,

    I've been lurking for a long time and due to excellent reviews and opinions voiced on this forum and the magazine reviews I decided to get the Ridgid TS3650. I read everything I could for at least a month and it came down to either the 3650 or the Craftsman 22124. I figured with the 3650 I would save enough to get a planer (which I did, picked up the Ridgid planer at the same time). Plus the fact that I am just a weekend woodworker I don't need a Biesemeyer fence and all. Well for now that is. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Well to me question. Now that I have the table saw what else do I need to get or do to it? I saw the awesome posts on the Promax router wing and the leg braces. Both are on my todo list. But what else should I get now or at least put on my list? What blades do you all suggest? I will mostly use the saw for furniture building and general cutting duties. What about the belt? Should I replace it with a link belt?

    Well, thanks for the insights and opinions. I'll keep you all posted on how it goes. I'm putting it together tonight!

    Cheers,
    Stefan

    [ 11-30-2005, 04:06 PM: Message edited by: sbolka ]

  • #2
    First of all, a link belt will not work on the 3650. The 3650's pulleys are grooved and require a serpentine belt. Even if you went to the expense of changing out the pulleys and adding a link belt, I doubt if it would make a difference. The 3650 easily will pass the infamous nickel test.

    As for the saw blade, there are many ways you can go here. For sure replace the OEM blade. It's alright for carpentry work but not very good for wood working.

    A good combo blade will serve you well. Ideally though the best results will be obtained if you use one blade that is designed for ripping and another blade that is designed for crosscutting. There certainly are many more choices than these when it comes to blades but for starters look at these blades;

    COMBO BLADE - Freud LU84R011(oops, forgot the 4)
    COMBO BLADE - Freud F410
    RIP BLADE - Freud LM72R010
    RIP BLADE - Freud LM74R010
    CROSSCUT BLADE - Freud LU85R010
    CROSSCUT BLADE - Freud F810

    [ 12-01-2005, 11:10 AM: Message edited by: BadgerDave ]
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      CONSIDER ADDING A FENCE TO THE STOCK MITER GAUGE. THE ADDED STABILITY AND ACCURACY IN CROSSCUTTING IS INVALUABLE. ALSO CONSIDER MAKING A CROSSCUT SLED. AGAIN, VERY VALUABLE IN SAFE, ACCURATE CROSSCUTTING OF LARGER MATERIAL. DON'T FORGET TO LOOK INTO SOME KIND OF OUTFEED SUPPORT TO ENSURE SAFE MOVEMENT OF STOCK PAST THE BLADE. ALSO, PUSH STICKS ARE A MUST FOR MOVING STOCK PAST THE BLADE WHEN RIPPING NARROW WIDTHS. AS ONE OF THE INDIVIDUALS WHO POSTS HERE NOTES IN HIS TAG LINE "ITS A TABLE SAW...DO YOU KNOW WHERE YOUR FINGERS ARE?"
      IF YOU\'RE WORKING HARD, YOU\'RE DOING IT WRONG

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      • #4
        A crosscut sled is a real good idea. So is an aftermarket precision miter gauge. Incra makes among the better values IMO. Safety devices like feather boards and push sticks or push shoes are always a good idea...many of these items can be built yourself.

        Blades are always a matter of personal preference, but are also what cuts the wood and can make a significant difference in your saw's performance. What to get depends on your needs. There's a couple of different philosophies. Some prefer to use a dedicated specialy blade for each type of cut...as in a 60T-80T crosscut blade, a 20T-30T ripping blade, and an 80T-100T zero to negative hook blade for sheet materials. Others do well with a 40T general purpose or 50T combo blade that does reasonably well with most materials. My preference is for a top shelf 40T general purpose blade like the Forrest WWII, Frued F410, or Ridge Carbide TS2000, then I keep an inexpensive 24T thin kerf ripper for thick hardwoods. Whichever way you choose, don't buy junk blades...IMO it pays to buy high quality. You might want to add a dado blade at some point if you'll be using the saw for dados.

        The Forrest WWII 40T blade is among the best blades on the market and is hard to beat....a good price is ~ $90 though, but you'll find it makes extremely clean cuts on a wide variety of materials and stays sharp a long time. The Freud F-410 is supposed to be comparable. No others I've used are at the same level including my Freud LU84, Oldham 60T, Dewalt 7646 60T, and Leitz 40T and 50T. If you're looking for more value, IMO, the best bang right now is offered by a Leitz distributor on Woodnet who goes by the handle of XCESSTOOLING. He has several German made blades by Leitz with the Irwin and Delta names on them for a fraction of retail. The feedback has been quite positive. I've found the Leitz blades to be very good...roughly comparable to my Freud blades, but not quite as clean as my Forrest. You can also often find some blade deals on Ebay. Here's the current Leitz 10" Woodnet listing along with a link:

        LEITZ PRO SERIES OPTICUT 10" z80 neg. hook ATB 5/8" bore fine crosscut in HW,SW and composites,for RAS and mitre saws,list is $66-on sale for $29

        Leitz Pro Series 10" z24 FULL KERF flat top rip blade $25 (list at $49)
        10" z24 FLAT TOP fast rip thin kerf #011 $14 (case of 10=$120)
        10" z40 ATB general purpose #002 $17 (20 left)
        10" z50 ATB/R combo #003 $18
        10" z60 ATB cutoff neg hook #007 $20
        10" z60 ATB crosscut #004 $20
        10" z80 ATB fine crosscut #005 $23
        10" z80 HIGH ATB neg hook melamine/veneers #006 $25 (16 left)
        35-626 10" z60 ATB 5/8" bore $25
        35-622 10" z80 ATB 5/8" bore $28
        35-629 10" z48 TC 5/8" bore $27
        35-610 10" z10 SQ 5/8" bore $18
        35-614 10" z48 ATB 5/8" bore $27
        35-633 10" z80 TC 5/8" bore *0 degree hook*$36
        35-617 10" z50 ATB/R 5/8" bore $24
        Leitz link
        Forrest review on Epinions

        Comment


        • #5
          Zero Clearance Insert is something you should put towards the top of your list. When you cut the blanks make about 4 or 5 so when you want a custon one you can just pop it in and go. Search the forum and you will find many threads on this topic, as well as some sources for not so expensive manufactured ones for about $12 each if you should be inclined to not make your own.

          An aux fence is another easy to make accessory which you will use again and again.

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