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Ridgid Jointer JPO6101 vs JPO610

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  • Ridgid Jointer JPO6101 vs JPO610

    Is there a big difference? Looking at purchasing used one or the other. Same price. One Orange and one gray. Which is recommended?

  • #2
    Pretty much the same jointer. The grey was made by Ridge Tool/Emerson and is the older of the two while the orange was made by Tectronic Inc./OWT. When Techtronic purchased the rights to use the RIDGID Trademark on certain tools, the jointer was one that they pretty much left alone design wise. Other than the color, the meat and potatoes of these two jointers are basically the same.
    Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

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    • #3
      I have the orange one and have been very satisfied with it. It needs the knives sharpened nut still does it's job very well. They aren't dull, they have a small knick in them. I made a mobile base as soon as I bought it, before assembly. I love the fact that it is movable, when not used, it goes in a corner. The machine is fairly quiet, as far as jointers go. It is easy to set up and use. I cannot speak for it's older version, the grey one as I have never used one.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
        Pretty much the same jointer. The grey was made by Ridge Tool/Emerson and is the older of the two while the orange was made by Tectronic Inc./OWT. When Techtronic purchased the rights to use the RIDGID Trademark on certain tools, the jointer was one that they pretty much left alone design wise. Other than the color, the meat and potatoes of these two jointers are basically the same.
        Is the warranty grandfathered on the gray tools? That could be a deciding factor.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rofl View Post

          Is the warranty grandfathered on the gray tools? That could be a deciding factor.
          The warranty against manufacturing defects is grandfathered on the grey tools. That being said, any manufacturing defects on a tool that is at least 13 years old probably would have shown up by now. The Limited Lifetime Service Agreement would not be available for either of these jointers as that is/was only offered to the original purchaser.
          Diapers and Politicians need to be changed often... Usually for the same reason.

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          • #6
            I have an opportunity to buy either... $300

            Orange is still in the box.
            Gray one is 100 miles away

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            • #7
              I have the orange one, and has proven to be an excellent tool, though to date it is only used on occasion.

              As Badger Dave stated, I believe there is little or no difference in the design and build of either the gray or orange models. When TTI took over the manufacture of the old Emerson built "Ridgid" tool line, there were a few models that accepted as originally designed. For example, the drill press got only a minor change to the quill, and the table saw (at the time of the takeover) no change at all. The thickness planer and the jointer were similar and I believe the original items were exactly the same with the only difference being a new orange paint.

              Old gray Ridgid tool line had a "Lifetime" warranty for "material and workmanship"... That basically covered anything that was assembled wrong or perhaps a weakness in a casting or other material flaw. (I have the gray-colored drill press.) By now, anything of that nature would have long-ago come into evidence.

              The only question I would have is the condition because of either the pre-owners use, or what the "boxed" unit looks like now. With the boxed unit, you are going to have to assemble it. That is about a hour or two's labor. You'll need some help as it is heavy. (Although I assembled mine all by myself with the help of an overhead chain-hoist.) Either one is probably a great buy, but look at the condition.

              CWS

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              • #8
                Remember that there are cast pieces in this tool and a 'dropped' box might have some hidden damage. So inspect the tool carefully and check for missing parts against the assembly manual, it lists everything that should be in the box. You don't want to get home and find out you are missing a bag of essential hardware and not be able to prove you didn't have it when you left the sellers place.

                Likewise for the gray tool make sure you get all the bits and pieces.

                You can probably find the manual online as a PDF and look it over BEFORE You go to look at either tool, then you'll have a good understanding of what should be there and how it all should work. Check condition of knives (visual and run a board through once or twice) and look for dull blades and/or nicks in the blade(s). Use these as bargaining points to bring the price down on the used (gray) tool. There should be two push pads which came with the tool, make sure you get those. They are needed to safely run a board through. Yes you can get others or make your own I'm just saying it comes with them so you should get them or allow for this in the price. Not sure but $300 is pretty close to new price isn't it? I remember them being closed out at $199.
                Last edited by Bob D.; 12-09-2016, 05:12 PM.
                "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

                https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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                • CWSmith
                  CWSmith commented
                  Editing a comment
                  You are correct on the 'close-out', however I bought mine for about $340, IIRC.

                  (Note that the close-out was not because the tool was discontinued or updated, but because Home Depot made the decision to not carry them in the store. I guess floor space was just getting too valuable for large stationary tools that weren't being purchased on a weekly basis.)

                  When I bought my jointer, it came with the two push blocks and a two-piece angle gauge that you had to assemble. They are noted in the manual.

                  CWS

              • #9
                If you want to spend a little more and have the room you
                can get this vintage 16" jointer that is so big it could double
                as a small aircraft carrier for your RC planes.

                http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/tls/5877943621.html

                I searched CL in my area and the two Ridgid jointers I found
                for sale they are asking $400 or more. Crazy, it's a nice jointer
                but if I was going to buy used I think for $400 to $600 I would
                jump up to a 8" Jet or other brand of slightly higher quality than
                the Ridgid/Emerson line. Any of the older Craftsman jointers will
                be made by Emerson same as the Ridgid tools were before TTI
                came along.
                Last edited by Bob D.; 12-10-2016, 06:20 AM.
                "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

                https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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                • #10
                  Bob, All very good information. I'd like to jump to an 8", but I don't have 220 wired in my shop, and the shop is in my basement. Getting an 8"er down there would be a royal pain. Plus. I'm just a small time hobby guy tired of dimensional lumber, and wants to work some rough sawn. Even the dimensional isn't very square. Looking to stay at $300 for a jointer so I have $ let over to put towards a planer. I'm in no hurry. Maybe I'll wait for some deals after the holidays. Need to upgrade my DC as well.

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                  • #11
                    Hello Folks, my first time to post and I have a question about my Rigid 6101 Jointer. I'm going to replace my cutter head with a helical head and I've been reading that I need to lower not only the infeed table but also the outfeed. Could someone help me with lowering the outfeed side please? I've tried all I've read about and I know I'm doing something wrong, but I can't figure it out....also, is it even necessary to lower the outfeed side to get the old cutterhead out and the new one in? Thanks so much in advance for the help, I appreciate it.....Tom24

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                    • #12
                      Helical cutter head on Ridgid Jointer: Considering purchase of jointer and install of helical cutter head. However, need your advice on directions, the "how-to" of replacing current cutter head with the helical cutter head.

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                      • #13
                        Does Ridgid sell helix blades for the 6201 6- 1/8 jointer?

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                        • #14
                          I've viewed on YouTube a few videos showing the change out to a helical cutter. That would be your best place to look.

                          As far as RIDGID selling a helical cutter, not that I know of.
                          "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

                          https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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                          • #15
                            Got it. Thanks. Fred

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