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  • Portable Workbenches

    In this thread I'll list some links to various workbench designs I have found that I think might interest some of you. A number of them are made to use with other brand tools, and Festool seems to be one brand that for some reason has a large number of these modular or portable workbenches crafted by users. But I don't see a reason why they can't be adapted to work with other brand tools where modification may be necessary. In some cases it's just a matter of using another brand of tool. But some of the features are designed to work with a specific tool or accessory available from Festool or some other manufacturer and would require some modification to work with other brands, if at all.

    Anyway, I think there are loads of good ideas in the workbench designs presented here that can be incorporated into your own stationary or portable workbenches.

    Now the Paulk Workbench some of you may be familiar with. Ron Paulk, a builder came up with this design a few years ago and sells plans to his bench and there are loads of videos on YT showing various versions built by others and also the miter stand and second generation bench that Ron designed.

    A year or two ago I might have put up a link to a workbench/cart, the MFTC, that Tim Wilmots designed which is also very popular. But I think that got lost when all my posts were deleted this summer so I will put a link in this thread to the YT video about that one too.

    Makita also uses the Tanos Systainers for their tools just a Festool does. They are nice in that they stack and interlock and are modular. The boxes themselves are light but sturdy. They are not the type of box you would be throwing around in the back of your pickup though, they are not intended for that. A number of the benches or carts that I have seen are built around housing these storage boxes.

    The Paulk workbench is not tool brand dependent meaning it can be used with any track saw and the miter station can be built to use any brand miter saw. Ron Paulk is a big Festool fan but that doesn't mean his designs are limited to use with Festool products.

    If any of you are looking for ideas on fitting out a trailer as a mobile shop you might want to look at the 50+ videos Ron has uploaded detailing how he went about building his trailers from design in SketchUp to finished product. Again lots of ideas you can use in your own trailer.



    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...FSk8uOmIEP3BJ1

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...nqlmxHAwdx6C83



    Last edited by Bob D.; 01-10-2018, 11:39 AM.
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

    https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

    ----

    1/20/2017 - The Beginning of a new Error

  • #2
    In case some of you guys have the Festool mft's, but you have to hurry, it's a limited run.
    Woodpeckers has come out with a new One Time Tool ? a more affordable MFT Square.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Mightyservant View Post
      In case some of you guys have the Festool mft's, but you have to hurry, it's a limited run.

      I would get the square from Anderson Plywood before the Woodpeckers. Half the cost and just as good in my opinion.

      https://www.andersonplywood.com/squa...ol-mft-square/

      "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

      https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

      ----

      1/20/2017 - The Beginning of a new Error

      Comment


      • Mightyservant
        Mightyservant commented
        Editing a comment
        Great price, excellent site. Still, I like the material and the pins of the woodpeckers.

      • Bob D.
        Bob D. commented
        Editing a comment
        They're both made from phenolic. The woodpecker is phenolic plastic and the one from Anderson is phenolic impregnated plywood.
        They're both sturdy and will hold up well.

        I like Woodpeckers tools, I have a few of them. But in this case I wouldn't spend $70 for their MFT square.

        I'd take part of the ~$50 savings and buy a couple Parf dogs for $15 from Lee Valley and pocket the rest.
        http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/pag...85&cat=1,41637

        Really, if you have an MFT/3, you don't really need a setup square, you can cut your own using the MFT/3 if you have it set up right.

    • #4


      "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

      https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

      ----

      1/20/2017 - The Beginning of a new Error

      Comment


      • #5
        Or make your own work surface with this kit available in the US and Canada from Lee Valley.
        "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

        https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

        ----

        1/20/2017 - The Beginning of a new Error

        Comment


        • Mightyservant
          Mightyservant commented
          Editing a comment
          Excellent videos, never even knew you could make that kind of top with out having to go to a CNC shop. The thought of doing that seems to curb my enthusiasm. Thank you for posting these !
          Last edited by Mightyservant; 01-11-2018, 01:32 PM.

      • #6
        If you are referring to the spacing between the holes they are very accurate, the grid spacing is the same throughout. Your attention to detail when drilling is probably the biggest factor in the accuracy of the grid. If you are not careful when drilling your pilot holes or when using the guide bushing to drill the 20mm holes then you could end up with some differences in spacing or alignment. But if you follow the steps Peter shows in the video it is almost foolproof.

        There are also patterns you can download (some for free) and take a piece of MDF to a local CNC shop and have a top made for you. If I were to go that route I think I would take a whole 4x8 sheet and have it done since the setup would be most of the work. Yes, it would take more time to do a whole sheet vice a roughly 3'x4' piece but then you would have enough to make a couple worktops of various sizes.









        I have seen welding fab tables that use the same pattern and I know that Bessey and others make many clamps for metalworking that can be used on such a table.

        This site has some good examples of what I am talking about if you have not seen them before. I know nothing about them just found the site in a search just now.
        https://weldtables.com/





        "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

        https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

        ----

        1/20/2017 - The Beginning of a new Error

        Comment


        • #7
          Steve Ramsey has some great projects and videos. Here's one where he builds a stand for a RIDGID compact table saw.

          "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

          https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

          ----

          1/20/2017 - The Beginning of a new Error

          Comment


          • #8
            I was a little surprised how he built it, I figured he would build it out of plywood but it worked out great. I've got a built in cabinet with the same type of drawers of couple of which need some work, after seeing this I could probably make some repairs or replace them. I need to get some of those Kreg clamps, sure made assembly easier, I'm always screwing around with Pony clamps.

            Going through the Lee Valley catalogs is a little like going to Disneysworld, you'll never go back to Disneyland after that
            Last edited by Mightyservant; 01-11-2018, 01:48 PM.

            Comment


            • #9
              I really like most of these and have always wanted to make Ron Paulk's version. However, I had some Christmas gift cards to burn so I picked this up, https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-1-...5047/205887786 . It's actually a great little table. I plan on adding a couple of 2 x 4 rails to make it longer for holding bigger sheets. Typically, I use a 3' x 3' piece of plywood on top of sawhorses at work but I thought this may be a little better, we'll see. I doubt that I will ever use the router table part, maybe on a personal side job. I really like the fact that the legs "twist lock" if you will in place, they aren't going anywhere.

              Just my 2 cents worth.

              Comment


              • Mightyservant
                Mightyservant commented
                Editing a comment
                Clever design, I like that you can store it away, use it as a router table, clamp slots.
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