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  • #16
    I went to glue up something this morning and reached for one of my 4oz. Babe-Bot glue bottles. I had one going with some Original Titebond and the other has Titebond III. The Original stuff was older and I figured I'd used what was left in the bottle plus some more to do this glue up. But when I tried to get the glue out it was pretty far past its prime so I set it aside and used the TB III.

    I thought I'll clean that bottle out later and refill with some new glue. However, when I got around to actually cleaning it 15 minutes later I thought; "Is this really worth the trouble?". My answer was no so I tossed it. Maybe I was wrong. I bought three of them years ago for less than $10. Not sure what they cost now but I based my decision to trash that one based on what I remembered paying for them and not on what they cost now so that was probably not a good evaluation method all by itself. It should have been one of many factors in the decision.

    Still, I didn't feel like spending 10 minutes or more cleaning out that old glue then cleaning the sink and whatever tools I needed to get the old glue out of the crevices in the bottle. Can you really get it all out easily plus it ends up going down the drain so will some of it collect in the traps or pipe and end up creating or contributing to a future clog? Don't want to deal with that so I just tossed it.

    But what would you have done? If you've cleaned yours in the past how did you do it and was it worth the trouble?
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2006
    "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

    https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

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    • #17
      Yes, I've cleaned out several glue bottles over the years. Hot tap water after I've dumped out as much as possible into the trash can. Usually, I'll turn th glue bottle upside down and let it drain as much as possible. Hot tap water removes the rest.

      Comment


      • #18
        It was almost solid. Must have had an air leak or cap was off for long time. The glue was very old, over 2 years since I put it in the bottle.
        "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2006
        "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

        https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

        https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

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        • #19
          Not too much happening here lately. I've been working on the sewing table
          for my sister on and off in between yard work and whatever else comes up.

          Here's a couple photos from the past week.

          Here I have all the hinges installed.
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          Setting up the hinge jig.
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          Routing the hinge mortises with the DeWalt cordless plunge router.
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          Routing the mortises is a two step process. The center section has to be
          deeper(~8mm) for the barrel of the hinge, each leaf is only 2.4mm thick.

          So I made this jig with the two inserts to guide the bit for the deeper cut. I used painters tape to hold
          them in position. The other pieces of tape are so the router was sitting at the same elevation all around.
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          Last edited by Bob D.; 09-08-2021, 03:27 PM.
          "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2006
          "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

          https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

          https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

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          Comment


          • #20
            Many years ago I bought a Milwaukee Body-Grip router, model 5616-29. It is variable speed and came with both 1/2 and 1/4" collets. I really like the body grip, it makes one-handed use a breeze. The depth adjuster is also good. The soft start and variable speed work well and I like the positioning and style of the power switch. You just have to reach over with your thumb and turn it on or off and can maintain your grip on the router. On the PC690 you have to release the grip of one of your hands to reach the power switch. I don't like that. Also the PC690 switch has a soft plastic dust cover which makes it hard to see the switch and which way is on or off. The Milwaukee is much nicer. My Milwaukee was made here in the USA. I don't know where they make them now since TTI gobbled them up.

            If you mount it in a router table you can use the depth adjuster from above the table by reaching through a hole in the base. What was not available at the time (as best I can remember) was a plunge base, and it's why not long afterward I bought a PC690VS router kit which came with a fixed and a plunge base. Then I came across a fixed speed 690 with only a fixed base at a yard sale for $25 so I bought that to mount in the router table on the TS3650. Later I needed a larger router to power a big bit for making panel doors for the new kitchen cabinets I was building so I bought the big PC7518 3-1/4HP router. That's how my router collection got started.

            Recently I came across a review on YT of the Milwaukee 5616 router with a plunge base. I thought when did they come out with that so I had to watch to see. I liked it and did some searching on the Milwaukee website and a few other places but wasn't coming up with anything about this fixed base as far as if it was available separately and how much. It seems it was only available as part of the kit with the router.

            eBay to the rescue. Searched on eBay and found someone selling brand new OEM plunge bases so I grabbed one and it arrived today. Fit like a glove and now about 15 years after I got that router I have a plunge base for it. I'll throw a pic in here later.

            Won't get much done in the shop today. The WX is nice and cool and I have yard work to do so I will get that out of the way today. Hamfest coming up this Sunday so tomorrow I want to get together whatever I want to sell. Any money I make from the Hamfest I will put into my metal lathe fund.
            Last edited by Bob D.; 09-14-2021, 09:11 PM.
            "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2006
            "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

            https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

            https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

            ----

            Comment


            • #21
              I got some time to work on the sewing table over the past couple days. I had a couple voids in the wood that I needed to fill. They weren't big enough for epoxy, or so I thought. I've never used epoxy to fill voids or knots in wood so really I don't know if I should have used epoxy for these or mot. But I had same Starbond dark brown medium thick CA glue so I thought I will give that a try. Took a couple applications on some spots but it worked well. To get it to set up fast I used the accelerant but I wanted to keep it from being sprayed all over the surrounding area because I did not know how it would affect whatever finish I wanted to apply later. So I made myself a spray shield out of a scrap of cardboard to direct the spray only on a tiny area. All that was required was to make a 1/4" hole in the cardboard then hold it over the glue and give it a short burst of accelerant. Depending on how high the shield is held above the work and the angle you can control how big of an area is covered from just over 1/4" to about 3/4" in diameter. If you make a narrow slot in the cardboard then you can use it for long, thin areas.


              This photo was taken just before the last application of CA glue. I smoothed out the surface and wiped it down with mineral spirits to see what it would look like. Then I filled in those little holes you can see in the dark area. That dark area is all CA glue and about 1/16 wide x ~4 inches long.

              I used a #4 plane set for a very light shaving to skim off the CA glue above the surface. That revealed those two tiny holes which I then filled.
              Click image for larger version  Name:	Sewing table Top  (2).jpeg Views:	0 Size:	78.7 KB ID:	750344

              I am surprised I have received only one bite on the dovetail jig so far. They asked a question and then I never heard from them again. I did notice there are not many listed for sale. I guess they have fallen out of favor. Demand would be driven mostly I would think by interest in building pieces with mortise and tenon joinery, and currently those styles are not in vogue.

              I also put a unused UHMW ZCI made by T-TrackUSA for the TS-3650 on Craigslist and eBay but haven't heard anything on it which surprises me. I don't know if the Ts-3650 shares a insert size with any other RIDGID saw, maybe the 3660 but I'm not sure. Are the inserts on the earlier table saws like the TS2424 or 2412 the same as the TS3650?
              Last edited by Bob D.; 09-14-2021, 09:02 PM.
              "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2006
              "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

              https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

              https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

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              Comment


              • #22
                Playing around yesterday I made a mower blade sharpening jig that roughly mimics a commercially made one. I made mine from some scraps of wood and bits of metal I had hanging around in the junk box and used whatever fasteners I could find in my cabinet that would work. I had recently watched a review of some common lawn mower blade sharpeners on YT and I liked the way one of them worked and the results achieved. Then I came across a video of someone who had made their own and I thought it might be worth giving it a try. I scrounged up what I thought I needed and proceeded to put this contraption together and believe it or not it actually worked half decent.

                I've sharpened my mower blades for decades using my bench grinder or a hand held grinder and with files and had good results. Using this jig and a hand held 4.5" grinder with a flap wheel does not really make the job go any faster, but it does constrain the grinder orientation to the blade to maintain a uniform angle resulting in a more uniform edge and an exact angle. It is adjustable for different blade angles over a limited range of 48 to 25 degrees. I set the blade to match the angle on the blades I wanted to sharpen.

                Now the commercial unit is made from steel and I made mine from mostly wood. All the moveable joints are simply bolts with a couple washers between them to allow the pieces to slip past each other without binding but still be reasonably tight. I made it from wood just to see how well it worked and then decide if I should make a sturdier one in either aluminum or steel. And I think that I will make one but before I do I want to try it out on sharpening the blades for my JD 72" rear discharge grooming mower. This mower has three blades each about 25"L x 2.75"W x .25" thick, so I want to be sure the size of the jig will be able to handle these larger heavier blades as they are larger than the blades on the lawn tractor or push mower.

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                So I tested on a set of blades for my lawn tractor and it worked OK. Later I will remove the blades from the big mower and try those. But that probably won't happen until the end of mowing season as it's a pain to get the blades off that big mower. I have to pick it up with the loader on the tractor to get to the blades. So I'll wait until I drop the mower off the tractor in the Fall. Somewhere around Thanksgiving is when I stop using that mower and attach a blade to be ready for snow or a rake if there are lots of leaves to clear.

                It does keep the grinder on the same angle and guides your action as you sharpen. I found it is easier to use when pushing the grinder away from you. Being as it is wood it's not as sturdy as a all metal version would be but it's good enough to evaluate if it will be effective. I don't think I would pay the asking price (>$250) for the commercial version but if I can build one for less than $30 I think it's worth doing.

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                Last edited by Bob D.; Yesterday, 05:29 AM.
                "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2006
                "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

                https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

                https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

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