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How to increase the longevity of powertools in a cost effective way?

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  • toolcurve
    replied
    The biggest thing I would say is to buy good quality, that doesn't mean the most expensive but Dewalt over Ryobi and then take care of them. 90% of everything you do will be how you take care of your tools, keep them clean and well kept, so the grease doesn't build up and get dirty where the motors overheat, and keep the batteries in a cool dry place when not in use and that will help overall the longevity of the tools and then for tools like table saws and such keep them well maintained.

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  • CWSmith
    commented on 's reply
    Most likely, and I considered that before I posted. But WTH, it was still a good post for anyone else wanting to know and it got a gripe off my chest. I've seen so many tools returned to Home Depot that were disgustingly abused.

    CWS

  • PLUMBER RICK
    replied
    Are we all being played by a future spammer who claims he's new to tools. Yet his occupation and name shows otherwise.

    Rick.

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  • reConx
    replied
    Not a knock on Ryobi but after I've moved on from basic drill/impact/recip they have become my "lenders" as they are inexpensive and sometimes I don't ask for them back It was interesting to rejuvenate my blue Ryobi tools with lithium power.
    Last edited by reConx; 07-24-2022, 09:02 AM.

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  • CWSmith
    commented on 's reply
    I totally agree, with the exception perhaps that you know the relative is knowledgeable and safe.

    I don't lend tools to anyone, as I've had some poor experiences. I've learned that if a friend or relative needs that kind of help, go a step further and just take your tool there and help them out.

    A couple of good examples: I once lent my best friend my belt sander, with several brand-new belts; three months later I had to go get it, as he didn't return it after a couple of requests. The belts were gone (never to be replaced) and the thing was clogged with dust and the rollers corroded, because he just left it in his damp basement sitting on the floor.

    Another good friend borrowed my Sears shop vac. Two months later I went down to his office and found the vac full of murky, smelly water. The filter was moldy and disentigrading and the metal motor cover rusted and rusted through in a couple of places. That was the last straw and I refuse to loan anything to anybody for more than an afternoon.

    CWS

  • drainman scott
    replied
    I would add , don't loan your tools out especially to relatives .. To be fair not all relatives would abuse your tools knowingly sometimes they don't know how to properly operate it .

    As an example one might use your Kobalt 12" cordless chainsaw to cut down a shrub then decide while I have it I think I will remove the roots .. Chains dull quickly when cutting through earth .

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  • CWSmith
    replied
    It's really quit simple, don't abuse your tools, whether they are simple hand tools or more expensive power tools. Owners should read the instruction manual before they put the tool to use and they should on occasion re-read to ensure they remember the tool's proper use and limits.

    My very first power tool was a Sears 'Companion' 1/4-inch drill (The 'Companion' label, was cheap and didn't rate the regular 'Craftsman' label.) I bought it around 1967 and it still works as if it was new. Cheap, bronze bearing (not ball or roller bearing), it would overheat and you had to oil it every so often. I have it today, and it work well as does every power tool that I've owned since.

    Similarly I have a 1964 Craftsman Radial Arm Saw. It is my favorite large tool and works as new. Again, I keep it clean, dry, and well aligned and I don't abuse it by cutting anything it wasn't designed to cut. Equally important is that I am knowledgeable in it's safe operation. I've never had it jam or kick-back because I know how to use it safely!

    I've seen tools that were used and abused to the point that they overheated (actually smoked), thrown to the ground in anger, dropped, and left in rain. I've seen tools that were never wiped off, never cleaned, and probably never lubricated. Rusted drill chucks, motors clogged with sawdust, and over strained because of dull blades and bits. Another abuse is undersized extension cords that cause the tools to overheat and often blow a fuse or trip a breaker. Make sure your power tool is not starved of electricity, use the proper-sized power cord, voltage and amperage.

    I hope this helps,

    CWS

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  • reConx
    replied
    In the past there was always good<better<best but today even the basic cordless tools can put out decent specs and are priced for low cost replacement. But to answer your question Ridgid cordless power tools offer a life-time service agreement LSA when registered. For example no matter the brand all batteries will eventually begin to fail or have reduced endurance and that's where Ridgid batteries have "paid off" for me. Basically all I do to increase the overall life of power tools is to avoid excessive abuse, keep them dry and clean.

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  • How to increase the longevity of powertools in a cost effective way?

    I have recently started using powertools. I would really like to know how to increase the overall life of these tools. All tips and suggestions will be appreciated.
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