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  • What tool to buy next...

    Nobunaga's Newbee question #2:
    Alright fellas, now that i have a kick-butt table saw what should be my next tooling purchase? Keep in mind i am a newbee, a squid, a greenhorn, a... well you get the idea. I am chomping at the (router) bit to start making some of the jigs and fixtures i have been reading up on, but when the only real woodworking tool you have is a tablesaw (not that that is a bad thing) it seems a bit limiting.
    Should I next get a drill press, a router table (I do have a couple of Ryobi routers and a nice Ryobi miter saw ), band saw...
    Obviously after buying a $500 TS, i'm not swimming in the dough about now, so what do you guys suggest? What would be the most beneficial for continuing on?
    Yoroshiku onegai shimasu

  • #2
    There's two ways to go on this and either way requires some thought on your part. First, you can become a "collector" and go after the tools with the idea that you're equiping a shop with some particular kind of woodworking you intend to do somewhere out there in the future.

    Or, you find the project first and then review the plans and processes that you will need to execute in order to make the project. What tools are required will then be dictated by the project.

    For instance, if you're building a deck or remodeling the the structure, you're fine with the table saw and/or miter saw and probably a wealth of hand tools. But you might want to consider a nailer and compressor with which to do the trim work, etc.

    On the other hand, if your looking at building kitchen cabinets, or a chest of drawers, etc. The you might want to look at adding a good router, dovetail jib, jointer, and/or maybe a planer. If you're into doing any of these kind of things with sleek curves, scrolling trim work or the like, then a bandsaw would probably be in order.

    The point is that almost everyone is going to have some priority for the next tool of choice. But most likely it is the kind of work that the person does and their personal experience that will drive that opinion.

    I hope this helps,

    CWS

    Comment


    • #3
      nobunaga,

      Are you going to be working with rough cut wood? If so, you definately need a planer and a jointer.

      If not, then I would recommend a bandsaw and/or drill press and/or router table.

      Oh yeah, and a dust collector, air filter, respirators etc.

      <-- just 'cause I can!

      Hey, check it out!! POST # 500!!
      Lorax
      "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

      Comment


      • #4
        Scan your brain for the things that you most want to build. What do they require, in common inorder ot complete them? I'm guessing that as nice as a planer and jointer are you can get by for a while without them. If you plan to put decorative edges on the projects then a router is needful. Joining narrow boards to make a wider surface requires either a plate jointer or a doweling jig (much less expensive and it was the standard for years). Anyway, you get my drift. If you are like the rest of us you will have an ongoing 'want list' of tools and accessories.
        Later,
        Chiz
        Later,
        Chiz
        https://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/frown.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...es/redface.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...s/rolleyes.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/smile.png

        Comment


        • #5
          Scan your brain for the things that you most want to build. What do they require, in common inorder ot complete them? I'm guessing that as nice as a planer and jointer are you can get by for a while without them. If you plan to put decorative edges on the projects then a router is needful. Joining narrow boards to make a wider surface requires either a plate jointer or a doweling jig (much less expensive and it was the standard for years). Anyway, you get my drift. If you are like the rest of us you will have an ongoing 'want list' of tools and accessories.
          Later,
          Chiz
          Later,
          Chiz
          https://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/frown.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...es/redface.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...s/rolleyes.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/smile.png

          Comment


          • #6
            What ever equipment you buy get a good quality piece. Saving 100 dollars feels good when you walk out of the store but you will be spending your valuable time with this equipment. So invest in something that will last and will be a pleasure to use.

            Also read the literature that comes with the tools. Life is to short to spend it cursing at poor quality tools or chasing after a bloody finger under a new piece of equipment.

            As far as making the best choice as to what to get next, well, as everyone else has written, thats going to depend on what type of projects you want to do and your own comfort level regarding your abilities.
            Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

            Comment


            • #7
              It really depends on what you want to build, but I find that a router in an RT is an incredibly valuable and versatile tool....and you can build the RT yourself pretty cheap...doesn't have to be fancy to get you started.

              A jointer and planer are great from smoothing stock and making it flat and square, which is a great way to start most project. Having both machines is best IMO, but I understand the budget restraints. If I could only have one it'd be the planer b/c you can make a sled to help flatten the face of a board with the planer (a job the jointer is best at), but it's about impossible to get the jointer to make to flat faces parallel to each other (a job the planer can do). You can use your TS or router table to do edge jointing to finish dimensioning your stock. (A DC will follow!)

              Comment


              • #8
                Go by what you Need, not what looks nice, also consider the space you have, having so many tools in a shop that yyou no longer have space for the projects is of not much bgood either,

                also if you want to go power or hand tools, to some degree,

                a good work bench and wood vice may be worth a look

                each and ever tool has its uses, the table saw is probably the most versatile wood working tool out there, and has many assories that can give it extra abilities, but many times it is better to go individual tools than trying to make a multi tool,

                a good 3/8" variable speed hand drill is a good investment if you don't have one, Corded or cordless,

                a router is a great tool I only own 4 or 5 of them but I normally would not suggest it as a second tool, but then it might be that is what the next project calls for, (over time you will end up spending more for bits than the router)
                but a router with a "good Table" can be very useful.

                a kreg jig (for face frames is a very useful tool if your thinking of cabinet work), it is a jig for drilling screw holes to assemble face frames and boxes,

                a good random orbit sander is worth the moneys,

                I would look in to more hand tools electric or hand powered, chisels, sanders, hand plane,

                If your not getting it now a good good wood working magazine, "wood magazine" is a good one for general info and projects, and how to, I am sure there are others out there as well,

                a jointer is a good tool but if your not joining boards for glue up for table tops and that it will set idle a lot,
                a joiner is designed to straighten a edge of a board, or to smooth a edge of rough cut lumber,

                A jointer is not a thickness planer, a thick ness planer is to make the thickness uniform on a board, or to thin it,

                a miter saw is a possible look in to table saws are poor at cross cutting (not saying it is not possible to do a good job cross cutting on a table saw, but a miter saw will do it easer and nice)

                when building shop furniture I suggest making the benches and tables the same height as the table saw so one can use them as supports for cutting large pieces of lumber and plywoods

                a drill press is nice, but I don't use one in the shop that often I use a hand drill much more,
                Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                attributed to Samuel Johnson
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                PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                Comment


                • #9
                  WOW! Thanks fellas for all the comments! The general theme i getting here is knowing what i want to do and getting the tools to do it. I agree with that. My real interest lies in joining. Being a former tool & die maker, joining just seems to be reminiscent of the precision work i used to do in steel. I've really missed that since turning to computers
                  The problem i have is in any project it takes several tools to get to the finished project. Even all the jigs and fixtures. But you guys are right. If i want to finish this project i have to either buy the tools to do it or find an alternative devise to produce the same thing.
                  My thoughts are a drill press (i'm not a great freehand driller like BHD ), and then maybe a good router table(?). Jeez! So many decisions!!! (Maybe that's Why Lorax when icon crazy - he just couldn't decide which one...)
                  Yoroshiku onegai shimasu

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Icon crazy?

                    Originally posted by nobunaga-sama
                    WOW! Jeez! So many decisions!!! (Maybe that's Why Lorax when icon crazy - he just couldn't decide which one...)
                    Actually I was celebrating the fact that Josh increased our smiley limit from 4 to 15.

                    So you were a tool and die maker? I was a machinist for 25 yrs before I retired. Love workin' with my hands. Just a bit of advice for what it's worth. Don't get all wrapped up in trying to hold the same tolerances you are used to working with. It's wood. It will grow or shrink a couple thousandths just sitting on your workbench. I'm sure you get the idea.

                    Oh yeah, books! Did anyone mention books? Local library is a great source. When you find some books you like, you can get them from here cheap. http://www.hamiltonbooks.com
                    Lorax
                    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      What tool to buy next...

                      I would suggest that you consider a good quality dust collector to be high on the list. The known health hazards from wood dust should make this a must have item for any shop.


                      My 0.02 worth.


                      Ken

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Still say icon crazy!

                        Speaking of the tolerances (lol), I do find myself wanting to grab a depth mic or outside mic for some of this stuff. I have to remind myself, "no - this is wood ya numbskull!" It just seems like it would be so much easier on a Bridgeport man!
                        I have bought a few great starter books at B&N. I will check out your link maybe tonight.

                        ken, all i have right now is my Ridgid 5hp shop vac. Shes a good'un but i'm not sure if i will be swingin out the wallet for the major system just yet. But i hear ya my brother!
                        Yoroshiku onegai shimasu

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          What tool to really buy!

                          CLAMPS, CLAMPS and more CLAMPS! I have found this to be a necessity when doing any woodworking.
                          You can build your own router table w/ some patience and very precise building. If you dont build your own table you might want to look at this one http://hartvilletool.com/product/10942 . This is a recent purchase and I am amazed at the quality along w/ the value of it.
                          With a router table you can use it as a joiner, dado maker and well alot of other things...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I was doing a little clamp pricing at HD and at Lowes. MY GOD!! I can't believe how expensive the quality woodworking clamps cost. If you want any length at all they are like $40 on up a piece! Cheese and Rice that's a lot o cash!
                            I'll check out that link today. Thanks buildthis!
                            Yoroshiku onegai shimasu

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by nobunaga-sama
                              I can't believe how expensive the quality woodworking clamps cost.
                              I know you said quality, but I picked up a bunch of cheapies at harbor freight. They have pads at the contact points and haven't caused any problems for me yet. The best part is that you could probably get two or three clamps for the cost of one at HD or Lowes.

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