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  • #91
    Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

    Craig,

    Nice jig for your dial indicator. I was able to use the mounting rod from a HF magnetic base and screw the rod into the miter gauge. My dial indicator mounts to the adjustable support rod. What did you use for the bar that slips into the table's t-slot?

    Ike

    Comment


    • #92
      Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

      Originally posted by VegasGuy View Post
      Craig,

      Nice jig for your dial indicator. I was able to use the mounting rod from a HF magnetic base and screw the rod into the miter gauge. My dial indicator mounts to the adjustable support rod. What did you use for the bar that slips into the table's t-slot?

      Ike
      It's an 18" miter slider from Incra. It's adjustable to remove all slop from the bar as it rides in the miter slot.

      Craig

      Comment


      • #93
        Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

        Originally posted by CraigM56 View Post
        It's an 18" miter slider from Incra. It's adjustable to remove all slop from the bar as it rides in the miter slot.

        Craig

        I have a similar jig I use that I got from a machine setup book. The only issue I've found is that I get the fence in alignment and then i move it and test it again and it's off.

        Are you folks rechecking the fence in several locations? I think the issue is the fence might twist when locking it down.

        Comment


        • #94
          Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

          This image shows deflection of my fence at the front in the locked position:


          This is the front to rear deflection:


          And at the back when locked:


          I found that with proper fence lock pressure the deflection is minimized.

          Craig
          Last edited by CraigM56; 05-03-2007, 02:12 PM.

          Comment


          • #95
            Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

            Thanks for all the tips. I found this before I put the saw together so saved myself many headaches (literally and figuratively).

            I left the wings off until I had it flipped as well. I also put the Herc-u-lift on before I did the wings as well so I could move the saw around easily. My bench turned out to be about 1" shorter than the bottom of the wings so it was easy to put the wings on with a bit of shimming.

            If you are putting together the lift, make sure you visit the website and download the manual from there. The bolt lengths are actually marked on the online version of the manual.

            I think I'm going to be on this forum frequently. I've only looked at a bit of it and already I have plans in mind. Looks to be a fun and informative place.


            Wes

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            • #96
              Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

              After using my new TS3650 for a couple of weeks, it has begun to make a loud noise when i use it. After some research, I found the noise is coming from the fan rubbing against the motor body. I can make the noise go away by pushing the motor axle such that the fan moves away from the body, but after a little bit (30 seconds) of the motor being on, it comes back. Any ideas?

              Comment


              • #97
                Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

                I purchased a TS3650 last weekend and have been reading over the instructions before I try to start assembling it. I have a question and was hoping I could get some info from people here.

                In the unpacking instructions on pg 17 of the manual, it says "Remove the protective oil that is applied to all unpainted metal surfaces. Use any ordinary household type grease and spot remover." I was wondering if anyone could recommend some specific products and let me know if there are any things that I should definitely NOT use.

                Thanks!

                Comment


                • #98
                  Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

                  I picked up most of it with some dry Scott Paper Shop Towels, then used some kerosene (just a enough to dampen the rag) on a cotton rag and wiped it down. I followed that with a clean dry rag then applied paste wax (NOT automotive wax which has silicone in it) and gave it two coats of wax. To maintain the finish I re-apply the wax about 3 or 4 times a year.

                  It's not safe to use gasoline, alcohol, or mineral spirits as they is much more risk of fire than there is using kerosene. You need to dispose of the soaked rags properly, those with grease and/or solvent (whatever you chose to use).
                  ---------------
                  Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                  ---------------
                  “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                  ---------
                  "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                  ---------
                  sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

                    I used paper towels with mineral spirits for the cast iron top and any grease that I found anywhere else. I know mineral spirits are flammable, but a little bit on some paper towel should not be an issue as long as you dispose of them properly. Don't dump it on mind you, and you will need lots of paper towel, but it works great.

                    No disrespect to you, Bob, but I know lots of people that used mineral spirits without incident. Make sure you are careful, though.

                    Good luck!

                    Comment


                    • Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

                      None taken. I used kerosene cause its safer and I had it readily available since I have a kerosene heater.
                      ---------------
                      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                      ---------------
                      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                      ---------
                      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                      ---------
                      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                      Comment


                      • Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

                        Funny... I was going to say I use mineral spirits because I have a can anyway, but I'd have to go buy kerosene!

                        More than one way to skin a cat, that's for sure.

                        Comment


                        • Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

                          Having recently assembled and adjusted a model 3650 table saw I can offer a few practical tips. First, I waited almost a year from the time I made up my mind until I actually bought the saw because I was intimidated by the weight of it, and knew I had to handle it alone. Having now done it, I can assure that almost any male woodworker and most women can do it. I had the saw delivered by Home Depot which eliminated one big challenge; how to get the box out of my truck. When I opened the box I found that all parts are neatly placed in styrofoam compartments. There are four heavy pieces; the two wings, which can easily be lifted and carried with one hand, thanks to the clamp slots; the motor, which takes two hands, but is not difficult to handle, and, the largest and heaviest, the main table with cast trunnions and enclosure. To transport the last piece I made a platform for a two-wheeled dolly to keep the part from shifting, and strapped the whole thing to the uprights of the dolly. It was not difficult to take the table down the basement stairs. Taking it off the dolly required that I tip it forward and I set it atop a couple lengths of 4x4 to make the ultimate righting of the partially assembled saw easier. Someone in an earlier thread suggested leaving the wings off until righting the saw, and that definitely makes the job of righting the saw much easier. If you have placed the upside-down saw table on 4x4s or other support, you will find that it is relatively easy to stand the saw upright after the legs are installed. Putting the wings on when the saw is in an upright position is also relatively easy if you use a sawhorse or other support to hold them in place. Also, once you have a pretty good alignment of the edges of the wings and the main table, use C clamps to hold that alignment steady while you tighten the bolts. I think the assembly of the Herculift causes some people problems (including me) because the concept is so simple that it just does not seem it is going to work, but it does, very well. Paay attention to the instruction that you do not tighten the anchor bolts; they need room to move.
                          When making adjustments I was frustrated by a lack of information until I discovered that the adjustment section of the manual comes after the section describing how to make cuts with the saw. Once I got the fence properly adjusted, following those instructions, I found it to be rock solid and right on the money.
                          The only other thing I can offer at this time is that I found the presence of the clamp slots in the wings to be annoying when I was changing blades, because I invariably set the wrenches down such that they fell through the slots to the floor. I solved that problem by cutting a couple of strips of 1/8 th inch Masonite (now called hardboard) about 2.5 wide by 24 inches long and dropping them into the slots when I am not using them.
                          I am 70 years old and skinny as a rail. If I can do it, so can you. Good Luck.

                          Comment


                          • Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

                            Originally posted by Mountaineer View Post
                            I did the same and also added extra blocks at the back edge of the table, to hold it high enought off the ground to give clearance to the mounts sticking out the back. I lifted mine alone, but the type work I do its common, get help or have someone stand by. ;-)
                            I'm BRAND NEW to this site and the TS3650. I plan to buy tomorrow. I don't understand what you did with the 2X4s. Did you turn the saw from upside down onto it's side on the 2X4s and then use them to stand it up? Surely you didn't have the saw upside down on the 2X4s and then stand it right side up!

                            Comment


                            • Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

                              Just checking in.

                              About a year and a half ago I bought this saw, assembled and aligned it, with help from this group, and have used it since. It's been a great saw. I'm very happy with it.

                              That's all,

                              DNC

                              Comment


                              • Re: TS-3650 Assembly Tips

                                Originally posted by puddlejumper View Post
                                I'm BRAND NEW to this site and the TS3650. I plan to buy tomorrow. I don't understand what you did with the 2X4s. Did you turn the saw from upside down onto it's side on the 2X4s and then use them to stand it up? Surely you didn't have the saw upside down on the 2X4s and then stand it right side up!
                                Sorry for the delay in replying. You probably have figured it out by now. Yes, I put a couple of short lengths of 4x4 on the basement floor and then deposited the main body of the saw on top of them in an upside down position, which is the only way you can attach the legs. I had made a platform for my two-wheeled dolly so I could get the saw down the basement stairs and it was relatively simple to deposit the saw onto the 4x4s from the dolly. Then, when it was time to right the saw, it was easier to get under the table and lift the saw onto its legs than it would have been had the saw been resting on the floor, Speaking of legs, remember to lift with yours instead of your back muscles. Hope you had success.

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