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  • Jointer setup or technique?

    after jointing stock for end glueing, I find there is small gap in the middle of the boards. The ends seem to match up well, but can't eliminate the gap in the center. Do I need to adjust the set up or am I causing the problem myself while feeding the stock across the knives?

  • #2
    Two things come to mind. Are you applying downward pressure to the stock on the outfeed side of the cutter head? Is your outfeed table set correctly?

    I saw a neat trick on how to adjust the outfeed side of your jointer the other day. What you do is lower the outfeed table so that its lower than the cutter head. Run a piece of stock far enough so the jointed end is over the lowered outfeed table. Shut the jointer off and adjust the outfeed table height up to the jointed edge of the stock.

    As long as you don't change the infeed table height, the jointer should stay perfectly aligned.
    Last edited by BadgerDave; 01-17-2006, 10:30 AM.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      Yes, to the downward pressure on the outfeed. In fact I've tried several variations of downward pressure on the stock, the results always seem the same. I'll look at the outfeed table again and try the tip you've suggested. Thanks

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      • #4
        So the trick is to not have any downward pressure on the outfeed? I'm still really new to all this, and have noticed that when I joint the wood, I have gaps on the ends. The middle seems to be fine, but it's the ends that have the smallest of gaps (somewhere in the fractions of a milimeter). Is it something I did wrong in setup of the tool maybe?
        I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by VASandy
          So the trick is to not have any downward pressure on the outfeed? Just the opposite. The majority of the downward pressure should be on the outfeed table. You should apply only enough downward pressure on the infeed table to keep the stock in contact with the table while feeding the stock at the same time. I'm still really new to all this, and have noticed that when I joint the wood, I have gaps on the ends. The middle seems to be fine, but it's the ends that have the smallest of gaps (somewhere in the fractions of a milimeter). Is it something I did wrong in setup of the tool maybe?
          10 characters
          Lorax
          "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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          • #6
            For what it is worth

            In the for what it is worth department, I apply moderate pressure on the piece being jointed against the fence and not in the downward position.

            If your piece is not at exactly 90 degrees itself, the jointer will correct for this by taking off the high side of the piece being jointed (assuming your fence is 90 degrees to the table). I only apply enough pressure down to offset the action of the spinning blades.

            ... and, as Bob D would say, "Its a jointer, do you know where your fingers are? "

            Jerry
            It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious.

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            • #7
              Instead of repeating what the others have and I agree with, I''l point you to this an online article with photos that may help you understand the process better.

              http://www.newwoodworker.com/usejntr.html
              ---------------
              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
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              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
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              • #8
                Thanks for the help!!! That article is great stuff, Bob D.
                I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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                • #9
                  Here is a question that I have been pondering for some time now. Most will advise to wax the jointer tables. One of my main uses for my jointer is to edge stock in preparation for glue up. As the stock goes across the out feed table it will invariably pick up some of the wax from the table. It seems obvious to me that any wax picked up by the stock will inhibit a good glue bond. So, wax on or wax off Daniel san?
                  “If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace” - Thomas Paine

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                  • #10
                    Wax on grasshopper. Never had any issues with glue. Rub the wax in, let is haze over and then polish. If you do not wax the rust that transfers to your edges will cause glue failure!

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