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hardwood floor finish

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  • hardwood floor finish

    i have a prefinished wood floor [ this is regular thick hardwood ] but unlike regular unfinished hardwood when you finish the floor this fills the cracks . the prefinished floor has Small spaces between the boards . we like the color of the floor but not the cracks . what can i use to go over this floor to fill and finish the floor . thanks for your help
    Charlie

    My seek the peek fundraiser page
    http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


    http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

    new work pictures 12/09
    http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

  • #2
    With pre-finished floor, it should have very few to no cracks between the boards. They should be installed tight. What may have happened is as it aged, the wood shrank and pulled apart.

    The only thing I can think of to fix this is to get some filler that you can color to match the wood and fill the cracks, then using something like Bona Chemi's (also sold under Orange Glow trademark in the US) floor refinisher. Make sure to clean up ALL of the filler before using the refinisher.

    I hope this helps. Are there lots of cracks? Like every board? If it's a new floor, I'd be calling the installers to come fix it.
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

    Comment


    • #3
      Does this "prefinished" floor actually have cracks between the pieces or is it one of those "beveled" edge floors that so many of the flooring retailers are pushing?

      The reason I ask, is that we were looking at having new hardwood flooring installed in a old home we recently purchased. We were all set to sign the contract when my wife asked about how close it would come to "matching" our old floor. In his explanation, the estimater casually mentioned that the edges would be "eased". When I asked how much, his reply was "comparitively". Certainly the samples that we had looked at didn't seem to have any easement or bevel, but when we went back to the store to look at exactly how "comparitively" he meant, I was NOT happy. Bottom line, we didn't proceed. In shopping at several other stores in the area, we've found that locally, this "bevelled" edge look is all the rage. From my point of view, it's just a dust catcher and I don't want it.

      However, if your floor is actual separation (cracks between the full depth for the boards) then it definitely sounds like "shrinkage" which is caused by either the boards not being properly dried at the factory or the stock wasn't allowed to properly acclimate to your house before it was installed. Whenever new wood (used for furniture, built-ins, paneling, or even flooring) is to be used or installed, it needs to sit in the home for a few days or more in order to adapt to the environment. Temperature and humidity does cause the wood to expand or contract; usually, the latter. Depending on the brand I suppose, it is doubtful that "prefinished" wood flooring would have been improperly "dried" at the factory. Still, temperature changes between the warehouse and your home would require some element of acclimation before installation.

      How to fix it? Well, the previous poster has about the only solution that I am aware of.

      CWS

      Comment


      • #4
        the floor is about 20 to 25 years old . i have owned the house for 16 years and this is the way it has bin from day i moved in . some of the Bord's are not tight together . like you said it is a dust and dirt collector . i was hoping i could use some kind of polyurethane or some thing like that .the finish is still good .some of the bord's you can fit your finger nail in it .
        Charlie

        My seek the peek fundraiser page
        http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


        http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

        new work pictures 12/09
        http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

        Comment


        • #5
          For an old floor, one thing a friend of mine once showed me on a house he was refinishing was to sand the entire floor to remove the coats of wax and/or polyurethane. Then another sanding in which he saved all the dust. He would add that to wood putty and fill any cracks. If you have cracks between every board, you probably wouldn't get enough sanding dust to really help out, so a color-match putty would be best. Do the final sanding, then go over the entire floor with a putty and get it into the cracks as well as you possibly can, allowing some to stick up. Allow the putty to set, or dry, and make sure it doesn't shrink too much. If it does, repeat the putty process. Once everything is filled and dried, sand again to even the surface. By leaving the putty high in the cracks, you'll be able to sand everything flush.

          Clean the surface really well using vacuum, and a sticky rag. Some people will use a mineral spirits as a final wipe. Whatever you do, make sure the surface is clean and dry. Then put on a stain and your finish as normal. It's a long, dusty, back-breaking job, but it will result in a flat no-dust-catcher floor.
          I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

          Comment


          • #6
            One thing you have not stated and has not been asked to this point is what is the average gap we are talking about here? Is it less than 1/32" (0.031"), more than a 1/16", or much more than a that, say an eighth of an inch or even more.

            Is it the entire floor or just portions and if so where are they. In the center of the floor, only the edges, from the center to one edge.

            Maybe a couple pics would help if you can.

            Do you happen to know the manufacturer of the flooring? Maybe there are a couple 'extra' or leftover pieces which may have markings on the backside that could help ID the brand or style. With that information you could go to the manufacturers website and ask them what they would recommend to use over top the factory finish.
            ---------------
            Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
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            “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
            ---------
            "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
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            Comment


            • #7
              thanks vasandy
              i see your from berryville i know some one that just moved away from there. he was a sheriff in leesburg . i will be in leesburg in march for the bloodhound trailing trails with my dog. but thanks for the info on the floor.
              Charlie

              My seek the peek fundraiser page
              http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


              http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

              new work pictures 12/09
              http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

              Comment


              • #8
                bob
                this is not every bord but most are about 1/16 or less .some are the end of the bords. i think hat they did not hammer the bords to tight when they put it in. i was just looking if there was a easy way to fix' but no big deal if not . this means the wife will just have to clean a little harder thanks for your help
                Charlie

                My seek the peek fundraiser page
                http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


                http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

                new work pictures 12/09
                http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Have yopu checked the humidity

                  Check the humidity, the floor will expand and contract with the change of seasons. If you do not have a whole house humidifier, think about getting one. If not how about for the area in question?

                  Comment

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