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Dado blade size vs mass

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  • Dado blade size vs mass

    I was reading in a magizine that on TS with smaller motors (like the 3650) the smaller 6" dado blades are better(less mass to spin.) What is your experience with them and will I be able to cut reasonably deep dados with the 6"?

    I am thinking about the Freud SD506.

    Thanks.

    Sorry for the duplicate post. Saw this forum and figured this would be a better place.
    Sometimes it is better to appear like an idiot, then to open your mouth and prove someone right.

    Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati
    (When all else fails, play dead)

  • #2
    I have the Freud 6" dado set and it has met all my requirements. The deepest cuts I have ever made with it were 3/4" for some half-lap joints on 2X4's when making a gate. For normal casework, it would be rare to ever cut a dado over 1/2".

    Why invest the extra money if you're not actually going to need the extra capacity. Save the wear and tear on your saw and go with the 6".

    Bob R

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    • #3
      I concur with Bob I have the same set and it works splendidly.

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      • #4
        BigGrey

        I have the SD508 on a TS2424 and it spins the set easily, I would have probably saved money and went with the 6” but when I was in the market Amazon had a deal on the 8” for like $140 so I went with it. The only time I have used the extra capacity of the 8” was when I was making some hanging racks for my K-body clamps and I’m sure I could have improvised some other method of making them had I not had the 8” stack.

        Woodslayer

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        • #5
          I run an 8" set on my 3650 with no problems. I am inclined to opt for the heavier mass of the 8" over the 6". With a heavier rotating mass there is less of a tendency of it slowing during the cut due to the heavier mass.
          SSG, U.S. Army
          Retired
          K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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          • #6
            TOD,

            I've never used a 3650 and don't know if they are underpowered, but have never had a a problem with "slowing during the cut" on my Delta. It seems to me, that if your saw is underpowered, that would favor a 6" set even more. I really can't imagine any contractor's saw stalling or slowing down cutting a normal sized dado.

            Bob B

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Bob R
              TOD,

              I've never used a 3650 and don't know if they are underpowered, but have never had a a problem with "slowing during the cut" on my Delta. It seems to me, that if your saw is underpowered, that would favor a 6" set even more. I really can't imagine any contractor's saw stalling or slowing down cutting a normal sized dado.

              Bob B
              Mine does not slow at all. My point was the heavier the mass the better IMO. An object in motion tends to stay in motion. The heavier object needs more outside influence than a lighter one to slow or stop it. Which is easier to stop a bullet or a locomotive?
              SSG, U.S. Army
              Retired
              K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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              • #8
                Is there a third choice?

                Originally posted by TOD
                Which is easier to stop a bullet or a locomotive?
                I would prefer not to try to stop either one, if it's all the same to you.
                Lorax
                "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by TOD
                  Mine does not slow at all. My point was the heavier the mass the better IMO. An object in motion tends to stay in motion. The heavier object needs more outside influence than a lighter one to slow or stop it. Which is easier to stop a bullet or a locomotive?
                  So if we're going to apply Newton's first law of motion, then it would be more difficult to get your locomotive moving in the first place which would put more of a strain on your saw.

                  If we accept your premise that heavier is better, then why would we stop at an 8" dado set, when 10" and 12" sets are available?

                  Bob R

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                  • #10
                    The larger diameter not only increases the mass, but also increases the force-multiplier of the resistance. Automobiles before power steering had large steering wheels so that a little pressure on the rim could exert a large amount at the shaft. The momentum increase of the larger mass only will apply at the start of the cut. As the resistance stays constant thru the cut, it will boil down to more resistance against the force of the motor to offset it.
                    A smaller dado blade is usually cheaper (for the same quality) but because the teeth will contact the wood more times in the same length of dado, it will dull faster. Ya don't get anything for free.
                    Practicing at practical wood working

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