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Dado/Molding Head Insert for TS3650

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  • Dado/Molding Head Insert for TS3650

    I have been looking for a dado insert for my Ridgid table saw and some posts here state that you can sometime find them at you local Home Depo store. I looked at a few and no luck, but at the last one I asked and they had one in stock. It was opened etc. but who cares. I paid $19.97 for it and went home. Its a Ridgid 8" Dado/Molding Head Insert and states for all Ridgid 10" table saws, part # AC1030. The problem is that when you set it inside the opening on the table, it dropped down and the four height set screws are so short, that you can not get the insert level with the table. Is this an 'old' insert for older Ridgid table saws? It is sort of red in color as opposed to the orange color of the inser that came with the saw. If this is not the correct insert, any idea where would be a good place to get one. I have seen some posts that state Sears carries inserts that also fit the Ridgid saws. Any ideas. I guess I could go to a hardware store and get longer set screws.

    Thanks

    Bruce

  • #2
    Dado/Molding Head

    I just looked at my manual for the saw and it states that the Dado head part number is AC1040. I'm guessing that the AC1030 might be for an older Ridgid table saw.
    I was going to go out and get a dado blade since I have a project that requires it, now I need an insert to go with it.

    Bruce

    Comment


    • #3
      The AC1030 insert fits the Ridgid 3612 and earlier models. The AC1040 is the one you need for your saw. BTW, $19.97 is a ripoff when you consider what you can get for less. You can buy blank inserts for the 3650 for around $12.

      One downside to the factory insert is that its a one size fits all. Thats great if you're cutting 13/16" dados but no so good for smaller size cuts. The wide opening in the Ridgid throat plate can increase your chances of experiencing tearout. The best of way to avoid that is to buy, or better yet make, some blank inserts and cut openings in them as future projects demand. Before too long, you'll have zero clearance inserts for all your dado needs.
      ================================================== ====
      All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

      Comment


      • #4
        making dado inserts

        Any ideas on the design (material etc) on making your own. I like your idea of making some to fit the different width of dados you may have over time.

        Bruce

        Comment


        • #5
          bstreyle,

          Here is a link to a couple other threads for this often discussed topic on this forum.

          http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...earance+insert

          Below is also a Quote from Bob D. on a similar post a few days ago that he answered pretty well (IMO):

          "there is plenty of information here on this forum. In fact your topic has been discussed a number of times in the past couple weeks. Use the search feature and/or look through the list of threads from the past year in the Woodworkers Corner, you will find at least 3 or 4 threads which contain a number of posts on the subject.

          Here's a search on dados that should give you just what you want;
          http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sea...?searchid=4016

          Making your own ZCI (Zero Clearance Insert) to match your dado set is a good idea. Remember that the maximum benefit is obtained from a ZCI when it is dedicated to one dado width, so you will want to make yourself a number of blanks and then cut an opening in one to match the dado width used for a particular project. Once you have a ZCI for say 23/32" or 3/4" or whatever, you should mark it and save for the next time you need to run a dado of that width.
          __________________
          ------------------
          It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?
          http://www.powertoolinstitute.com/stream1.html "


          Hope this helps, cause I know it did for me a while back when rowing the same boat!
          WWS
          Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

          Comment


          • #6
            Making zero clearance inserts

            Just made 6 for my saw using 1/2" oak plywood. Not that hard at all. Followed alot of the suggestions on this forum and others. Found a site that has video showing how to make your own ZCI.

            Follow link:

            http://www.woodsmith.com/issues/146/...e-dado-insert/

            Bruce S.

            Comment


            • #7
              Bruce,
              Awesome link - thanks! I love those internet videos. Just learned quite a bit.
              Skip
              Stay well and play well.
              Skip

              Comment


              • #8
                I agree, I didn't expect it to be that hard to make a ZCI but seeing the videos confirmed it. Thanks

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hey Bruce, thanks for the great tip on ZCI's

                  Originally posted by bstreyle
                  Just made 6 for my saw using 1/2" oak plywood. Not that hard at all. Followed alot of the suggestions on this forum and others. Found a site that has video showing how to make your own ZCI.

                  Follow link:

                  http://www.woodsmith.com/issues/146/...e-dado-insert/

                  Bruce S.
                  I was wanting to buy a dado insert but found out that they want 50 bucks for it - kinda scared me away and I tried finding a different brand that would do the trick.

                  Your link to making your own is great. I'm going to try making one this weekend.

                  Thanks again.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for the tip on ZCI's

                    Just watched the video and think it's a great piece of info.

                    I'll try making an insert this weekend.

                    Thanks again.

                    Gerry

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The Rigid TS3650 has a hold down screw at the front end of the throat plate and a tab at the back endto keep the throat plate attached to the table.

                      On shop-made inserts, you can drill a hole in the front for the mounting screw. A tab of scrap wood glued on the back end replaces the tab in the OEM throat plate.

                      I'm probably anal, but there must be a reason for the screw AND the tab on the OEM plate. I'd rather have the plate stay on the TS than have it sailing across the TS with me as a potential target. Call me a sissy, but I don;t like pain.
                      Ian Wilson

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        TS blade size.

                        So here is a question for those of you who have completed some homemade ZCI or bought a blank from somewhere. I finally got some time to make a couple last night. I also had the brown truck stop here during the week and drop off one that I bought from Might-T-Track USA. This morning I was going to install the blank I bought and bring the blade up through it using a 10" Frued Glue Line rip blade.

                        Now comes the confusion for me. I am not able to lower my blade far enough to put in the blank. It will hit my blade almost 1/4" before it will go flush with the table. I have been reading up and following all the threads on ZCIs for a while now and have not seen anyone mention this? Do most people not use 10-inch blades? I went back through all my docs and don't see anything set wrong on my TS. My blanks that I made and the one I bought are all of the standard 1/2" thickness and fit perfectly fine and flush with the table with no blade..... I don't think I will have this problem with my SD208 dado set, but won't have time to try that until this afternoon.

                        Thanks for any thoughts/opinions. Be gentle though. It has been three 75 hour work weeks in a row now and I might just be suffering from sleep deprivation!

                        WWS
                        Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You will have no problem with the 8" dado set. As for the 10" blade the safest way is to use an 8" blade with same kerf to cut the insert and then change to the 10" blade. But this it what I do. First I make mine with the rear locking tab. Then I just engage the rear tab hold the front of the inset up off the blade start the saw and slowly lower the insert until it is flush with the table, then using a piece of wood hold it down and bring the blade up through it. Not really safe but will work if you are careful.
                          SSG, U.S. Army
                          Retired
                          K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            "Not really safe ..."

                            So you know who to blame when you are at the dentist getting a couple teeth fixed. Sorry, but if you recognize that the operation is unsafe, you are crazy to continue to do it.

                            Use a smaller diameter blade which is the safe way, or some people use a router to thin the insert from the underside where the blade will protrude, and then install the insert and bring the blade up through the insert. I think that just adds extra work setting up the router that is easier handled by using the undersized blade.

                            Be sure to clamp the insert down to the table with a 2x4 or similar piece of wood while you make the first cut through the new insert. The table saws' fence can be used, but since it does not come in contact with the insert and only passes roughly 1/16' above it, there is the possibility of the insert rising up a bit and maybe jamming. Its a slight chance so I prefer to use the 2x4 which leaves nothing to chance. When making a ZCI for a dado set, you are cutting out much more material so bring the blade up very slowly until it makes contact with the bottom of the insert, then continue to slowly raise the blade until you achieve the height above the table that you want.
                            "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

                            https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              You are so right on it not being safe. Page 47 of the online manual shows a better way to do it. I guess I should follow the advice of my signature line. LOL
                              SSG, U.S. Army
                              Retired
                              K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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