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  • Queston about dial indicator measurements

    All, I purchased a dial indicator and have taken my first measurements on my two year old ts3650. So, with the plunger under pressure and locked into the magnetic base I put it up against the blade (a relatively new Freud) and was seeing measurements -.005 and +.0015. from zero. Does this indicate a bent blade assuming I'm taking the measurements correctly? I made sure to test it on part of the blade that should have been smooth the entire circumference. Then I tested a measurement on the arbor. I tested the indicator using the round metal that the blade butts up against and saw readings of -.001 to +.005. Again, what does this mean assuming I'm doing it correctly? Thanks

  • #2
    "assuming I'm doing it correctly" Either your arbor is bent or the shoulder is not machined perpendicular to the axis of the shaft. The runout will increase the further you are radially from the axis of the shaft.
    Either way, it looks like you need a new arbor.
    Last edited by Lorax; 01-26-2006, 07:30 PM.
    Lorax
    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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    • #3
      I've definitely noticed difference in longer pieces always thinking I needed to get my fence to be more accurate. I think the fence is pretty well dead on, but to hear that you think its the arbor sucks. I guess I have the lifetime support on that saw, but do you think it will be honored? Meaning are those measurements that out of line?

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      • #4
        I've definitely noticed difference in longer pieces always thinking I needed to get my fence to be more accurate. I think the fence is pretty well dead on, but to hear that you think its the arbor sucks. I guess I have the lifetime support on that saw, but do you think it will be honored? Meaning are those measurements that out of line?

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        • #5
          I don't know what the specs for the TS-3650 are, but I would think that runout of greater than 0.001" on the arbor flange is excessive. But some of our more knowledgeable members who were/are machinists would be able to give you a better answer or confirm what I think.

          When measuring the blade, did you pick a path (radius) that did not have any printing in the way? I remember checking one of my blades and was surprised to find that the printing on the blade made the indicator jump about 0.002" when the stylus passed over it.
          ---------------
          Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
          ---------------
          “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
          ---------
          "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
          ---------
          sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Need my eyes checked!

            OK Let's start over.
            "I put it up against the blade (a relatively new Freud) and was seeing measurements -.005 and +.0015".
            You wrote .0015 (1 and 1/2 thousandths). Is that right or did you mean .015 (fifteen thousandths)?
            I was a machinist for 25 yrs and I read it wrong. But hey, I've been retired for 3 whole years now.
            Lorax
            "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

            Comment


            • #7
              But his total deviation was -0.005 plus 0.0015 so that's 0.0065" isn't it?
              ---------------
              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
              ---------------
              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
              ---------
              "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
              ---------
              sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                You are absolutely correct sir! BUT if that .0015 is really .015 then his total is .020 ! Not that it matters much, either way it's too much.
                I also would not accept more than .001 at the arbor flange. I also like to see a total runout of less than .003 at the edge of the blade.
                Lorax
                "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm not quite sure how to read my dial indicator yet, but to put it another way I saw the indicator dial travel 4 ticks or thousandths in the positive direction and one in the negative so whatever that puts my measurement at. And yes I did make sure that the blade was free of any markings or those relief cuts they put in for heat reduction. Thanks to all who have responded so far. I'm getting a sinking feeling in my stomach.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Which measurement?

                    Originally posted by 00Buck
                    I'm not quite sure how to read my dial indicator yet, but to put it another way I saw the indicator dial travel 4 ticks or thousandths in the positive direction and one in the negative so whatever that puts my measurement at. And yes I did make sure that the blade was free of any markings or those relief cuts they put in for heat reduction. Thanks to all who have responded so far. I'm getting a sinking feeling in my stomach.
                    If this is the measurement at the arbor, you're screwed. If it's the measurement near the edge of the blade, you should be OK. Not great, but OK. IMHO
                    Lorax
                    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Check this site for some help on how to take measurements with your dial indicator. It's geared at a particular alignment measurements system, but you will get a good idea of how to use yours from readaing what it there.
                      http://www.in-lineindustries.com./a-line-it.html

                      Or try this site (copied from a post I made in another thread)
                      This video (below) will show you how to determine if the problem is your blade or arbor:

                      http://www.ts-aligner.com/tablesaw.htm

                      You can download from this page also, right click on the link where it says

                      " Instead, use this link: Table Saw Alignment "

                      and choose "Save As" to save the video to your computer hard drive.
                      But beware, it is 48 MB (don't even think about it on dial-up).
                      Last edited by Bob D.; 01-26-2006, 08:35 PM.
                      ---------------
                      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                      ---------------
                      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                      ---------
                      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                      ---------
                      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        IF I read your post right, you are getting 6 thousandths runout at the arbor and 6 1/2 thousandths on the blade. This indocates the blade is running true (within 1/2 thousandth), especially when the larger radius of the measurement is considered. If your set-up did not move, it looks like the problem is with the arbor or the face of the shoulder. Either way, a new blade won't correct it. With the indicator on the arbor, do you get any movement on the pointer when you put up/down pressure or end pressure on the threaded portion of the shaft? If so, it sounds like a bearing problem.
                        Also, with the indicator on the arbor shoulder face, does the needle move constantly from the high reading to the low? If it mainly stays constant except for a momentary change, that indicates a gouge or burr in the arbor face. A gouge should not be a major concern if most of the face is flat. A burr will cause major distortion at the blade rim. If its a burr, remove it, clean all parts, reinstall and recheck.
                        Last edited by Gofor; 01-26-2006, 09:34 PM.
                        Practicing at practical wood working

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                        • #13
                          ok, I rechecked the measurements based on that video...thanks for that link. I also made sure that there were no burrs. I checked the unthreaded part of the arbor and the arbor flange's face. Both are indicating about 1 and a half thousandths of an inch or run out. I'm assuming I'd want no more than .0005. So what now? Do any of you think Ridgid will fix the issue or is this something I will have to pay dearly for? Thanks again for all the help on this. They never taught this stuff in shop class.

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                          • #14
                            I could live with .0015" on the arbor. Now that you know you're doing it right, what reading do you get on the blade?
                            Lorax
                            "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ok, so I took measurements with the Freud and I saw almost a .009 difference. Oddly enough I tried it with the factory Ridgid blade and I saw a total of about .005. This is using the dial indicator in a fixed position and rotating the blade around. I noticed the popular thing to do is to build or buy a jig that runs in the miter slot with the dial indicator attached to it, but I was pretty sure that was only for testing your parallel to the miter slot.

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