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  • tablesaw top cleaning

    I have a ridgid tablesaw, the model I don't know it is the biggest HD sells.
    The top, alas has become stained with dried glue, water ring, a small spot of rust, and another unidentified stain or two (please no yelling for using as a work bench). I am happy to announce that it is now covered for use as a bench. Anyway what is the best method to use to restore to its former glory. I have already purchased the wax for the final stage. Also how do I find the model number?

    Thanks

    Jake

  • #2
    On my saw, Model 3612, the model/serial number name plate is located on the back left side of the saw as you look at it. For the glue spots, I'd just take a razor blade and scrape off the clumps. As far as the rest goes, WD40 and some 000 steel wool or a scotch guard pad and a ROS should take care of them.
    ================================================== ====
    ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

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    • #3
      thanks for the reply
      I tried the things you mentioned but there is still discoloring in the water ring and other discolorations. Everything else came up nice so I'll have to seek another solution for the remainder. Also it is a TS2424 1 whatever that is.

      Jake

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      • #4
        The 2424 is the predecessor of the 3612 which was followed by the current 3650. IIRC, the main difference between the 2424 and the 3612 is primarily some changes made in the fence and rail systems.

        Sorry to hear that the water ring and some discoloring didn't go away but it is after all a working tool and one can't really expect it to be in showroom condition forever. One thing you don't want to do is get too aggressive with any further attempts to clean up those areas. You definately want to maintain the flatness of the tabletop so things like low grit sandpaper and grinders should be avoided.
        ================================================== ====
        ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

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        • #5
          I stuck with the scotch pad and ROS, it is nice and smooth and shiny.
          I can easily live with the slight discolorations.
          Any tips on waxing would be appreciated.
          How many coats, hand techniques etc.
          I do not own a power buffer of any sort.

          Thanks
          Jake

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          • #6
            What works for me in my climate may not work for you but here's what I do. First, I start with a layer of Bostik TopCote®, let it dry and hand buff. This is used as a protection against rust. Next, I apply a coat of Johnsons Paste Wax and either hand buff or use my electric buffer. This step is primarily done to make the iron slippery. Finally, I apply another coat of Johnsons and buff it out. I also use this same procedure for all of my tools that have cast iron parts.

            Usually, two or three times a year I'll take some mineral spirits and remove all of the TopCote® and Johnsons from the table top and apply fresh coatings.
            ================================================== ====
            ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

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            • #7
              ok I'll get busy thanks for the info

              Jake

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              • #8
                Use your ROS as a buffer. Fold a cloth up a number of times to get a thick pad and place it under the sanding pad, works for me. Don't have any loose ends hanging out or they will surely catch on something and the cloth will be ripped out from under the ROS, then you'll be sanding again!
                "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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                • #9
                  I'm in Albuquerque, NM so the humidity is not an issue here. I just give it a good coat of wax and buff it out.

                  Like Badger said though, better to have a stained flat table than a wavy clean one. I'd live with the stain.

                  Pete

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                  • #10
                    some late advice

                    One other cleaning solution for all metal areas of large tools is a gental bull with a product called OUATER. pronounced water available in automotive section of most chains. There is also a cleaner by ZEP that takes out nearly everything and is fairly gentle.Its on the shelves at home depot in canada its purple and comes in a trigger bottle.A gentle glaze over with clr could also get rid of your rust stain(discoloration ) but be sure to rinse and dry very well.

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                    • #11
                      Sandra,

                      I did an internet search on

                      Originally posted by sandra
                      OUATER
                      and came up empty. Can you give me a URL that shows what you are talking about?

                      Thanks,

                      Jerry
                      It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious.

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                      • #12
                        I agree with the WD40, and Scotch-brite pads....works great for cleaning, and then follow up with wax.....let the wax "dry" for a long time, and then buff it with your ROS.

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                        • #13
                          The only thing I found when I googled was a bunch of other forums where people were saying the same thing however they have purchased it at truck stops harley stores and bumper to bumper auto stores there was on article that said there was a similar product called FLITZ, hope that helps some.
                          Last edited by sandra; 02-22-2006, 02:49 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Whoops!

                            Found where you had answered the previous question!

                            Slippance.


                            Jerry
                            It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious.

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