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  • Fence slipping on rail

    I have the 3650 and when I lock the fence to the rail and cut a sheet of plywood the head of the fence will shift outward by a 1/16" when a small amount of side pressure is applied. I have adjusted the real lock on the fence to make it tighter but it still slips. I prevented the fence from slipping by placing a clamps on the rail, I this a common problem or is it just my saw?

  • #2
    If you're positive that the fence is moving then further adjustment to the locking mechanism may be in order. However, there are some other possibilities that may be causing your cuts to be off. Your blade may not a parrellel to the fence. The fence also could be slightly out of alignment with the miter slot. You may be moving the work piece slightly away from the fence, do you use featherboards?
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      When cutting sheet goods I don't use any feather boards and but when cutting other stock I do use featherboards. I have aligned everything to with .002" tolerances (blade and fence). When locking down the fence handle how tight should it feel, should there be alot or a little resistance?


      Thanks!

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      • #4
        Does it want to slip the whole length of the rails or only in a certain area?
        SSG, U.S. Army
        Retired
        K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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        • #5
          I just went out and checked mine. Mine starts to apply locking pressure about half way between unlocked and locked.
          SSG, U.S. Army
          Retired
          K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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          • #6
            Just in the front.

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            • #7
              Did you check the nylon guides on the front of the rip fence? It could be that one is broke letting the fence cock a little.
              SSG, U.S. Army
              Retired
              K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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              • #8
                I had problems with longer boards "walking". After multiple checks, re-measurements, etc., I found the problem to be the splitter/blade guard. The thin kerf blade I was (and am still) using ('til I get a good full kerf Freud) is only a few thousandths of an inch narrower than the splitter. Taking the splitter on and off for dado cuts, etc, I had managed to knock the splitter out of alignment. The front edge still centered on the saw but the back was off from the blade edge. The longer the wood, the more it skewed the cut. One indicator of this is that you will start to get a bind on the blade (noticeable by sound, increased resistance against the cut, and friction burning on one side of the cut). I took two 18" straight edges and laid them against the sides of the blade with it full up, and trued the splitter in between them. Its kind of tedious with a thin kerf blade because the splitter will shift as you tighten the bolts. You just have to keep messing with it until the straight edges lay flat against the blade from front to back, and don't touch the splitter.
                I was lucky in that the wood was walking away from the fence, so I could see it starting to walk. Considering that a featherboard wouldn't keep it straight, I think it may be enough pressure to move the fence.
                Just another possibility you may want to check
                Practicing at practical wood working

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                • #9
                  I clamped the splitter to the rail and tightened it down. Square as can be.

                  Dave

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                  • #10
                    I think I found the problem, the fence lock was to loose and I also think that I was careless when waxing the tabletop and got some wax on the rails.

                    Thanks for all the advice!

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                    • #11
                      Actually, a lot of folks wax the rails so the fence will slide easier so I don't think that was part of the problem.
                      Lorax
                      "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Lorax
                        Actually, a lot of folks wax the rails so the fence will slide easier so I don't think that was part of the problem.

                        True here also I wax those puppies like no tomorrow
                        Not responsible for speeling mistakes
                        Jeff

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                        • #13
                          fence problem

                          Hi:

                          I have the video "How to Build a Shaker Table" by Kelly Mehler and he says
                          it's actually good to have the back of the fence a fraction off to prevent binding as the wood moves past the blade. I've been doing this (about 1/16 )and it hasn't been a problem and my cuts have been pretty accurate.

                          Maryjo

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                          • #14
                            That sounds like you making an adjustment to allow for the tool not working properly. A 16th adjustment out at the back of the fence will allow at least a 32nd error at the blade. IMHO not an acceptable loss of control.
                            Practicing at practical wood working

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                            • #15
                              The fence should be heeled out a little (further from the blade at the back than the front). This helps prevent binding between the blade and the fence, helps prevent burning, and helps prevent kickback. I agree that 1/16" is way too much. I have mine heeled out about .005" and get perfectly straight rips with no binding or burning (except cherry-that stuff gets burn marks if you even look at it funny).
                              Lorax
                              "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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