Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Teak wood

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Teak wood

    Evening all,

    Wondering where you get your teak from if you have used it for projects. I was in Woodcraft today and saw they had it for $17.50 BF. I think their prices are always on the high side so I am curious as to what kind of prices you are paying out there.
    ---------------
    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
    ---------------
    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
    ---------
    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
    ---------
    sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

  • #2
    Bob,

    This is where I get my lumber (local for me). Web page shows pricing for Teak. I have noticed that the pricing on the web site is usually higher than when I go in. They give volume discounts.

    http://www.emersonhardwood.com/cchw/...=7759065456014

    Hope this helps. I know you know this, but remember to clean the boards with acetone before gluing.
    What do you have planned?
    Last edited by cjh20; 02-25-2006, 11:36 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Well, I am thinking of some deck furniture for a three season room. A couple chairs and side tables. This would be under cover, so not in direct sunlight and would not be rained on, etc.

      Do you know of an alternative wood that is not as expensive and maybe not a rough on cutting tools? I have not worked with teak before, but I have heard it is pretty tough and dulls bits and blades fast as well as the dust being a nuisance.
      ---------------
      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
      ---------------
      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
      ---------
      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
      ---------
      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, the silica content can be harsh on tools. How about Cypress? I haven’t seen any since I moved to the Pacific Northwest, but it’s a joy to work with. And, of course, White Oak does okay in a covered outside area.

        Comment


        • #5
          Teak

          You can try these guys in Mays Landing.

          http://www.sjlumbermans.com/lumberpricelist/

          Also: From the classifieds in Wooden Boat Magazine
          Teak Lumber. Best Prices in the USA. $3.00/Bf and up. All sizes and thicknesses available 800-677-1614 (South Carolina)
          Last edited by swampyankee; 02-26-2006, 02:26 AM. Reason: phone number

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks to both of you for the feedback and info.

            cjh20 - Cypress is a much lighter color is it not? The warm brown tone of the teak is what we are looking for.

            Swampyankee - I know about SJLumbermans, and they are only about a 1/2 hour away. Their prices are a little lower than those I saw at Woodcraft. I have no intention of buying from Woodcraft, as I said they are always the highest around these parts, and I would bet that would hold true anywhere in the country.
            ---------------
            Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
            ---------------
            “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
            ---------
            "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
            ---------
            sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Have you thought about cedar? Also how does BF pricing work? I know it is different than stick price but whats the difference?
              SSG, U.S. Army
              Retired
              K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

              Comment


              • #8
                I found my answer

                What are Board Feet?
                A board foot is a unit of measurement that is similar to a square foot. For instance, each of these sizes are equal to one board foot:
                • 4/4 x 4" x 36"
                • 4/4 x 12" x 12"
                • 8/4 x 6" x 12"
                Square footage multiplied by the thickness of the lumber (4/4=1; 8/4 =2; etc.) equals the board footage. Take all measurements in inches and use the following formula: T x W x L / 144 = BF.
                All of our lumber is sold by the board foot and the quantity you type into the 'Quantity' box for ordering should refer to the number of board feet you need. We offer a selection service of $0.50 per board foot for size requirements or selection specifications you have.
                Why is hardwood lumber sold by the board foot, anyway?
                You might be used to seeing softwood lumber, such as pine or fir, sold by the lineal foot in nominal sizes like 1x12, 2x6, and so on. The most common use for these woods is in the construction trade where most items have a standard size; doors, studs, etc. Therefore it's easiest to softwoods in specific dimensions.
                However, hardwoods get used for a broader assortment of projects. A woodworker gets to decide the final size of the table, dresser, jewelry box he or she is making. Also there people using hardwoods for flooring, intarsia, turning, cabinetry, etc, and all of which use different sizes for different projects.
                At the sawmill, then, the sawyer is cutting hardwood logs for the best yeild and not a specific size; and therefore all the boards will vary in size from one to the next. Ultimately, this gives the woodworker the widest possibilities from a single board. Since hardwood lumber varies, the National Hardwood Lumber Association agreed that the method of measuring hardwood lumber is the board foot.
                SSG, U.S. Army
                Retired
                K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Bob... Have you decided to go with the teak?

                  Yes, Cypress starts out much lighter that Teak. Over time and exposure, it changes to a silver gray color like this:

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	300fd75db37199cd3f91d4e2fafbaeb9.jpg
Views:	2
Size:	21.7 KB
ID:	136

                  Some of the Mahogany and tropical Cherry species are decay resistant, but probably redder than what you are looking for (and less likely to be plantation grown).
                  I'm interested in what you have discovered and what you decided to use.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X