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  • Best saw I bought TS 3650

    Hi all.

    Just had to say what a deal this saw has been.

    I am glad I bought the Saw the more I use it the better I like it.

    I am totaly impressed with this saw.

    Even the ridgid blade performs better then some other blades that I have

    used in the past and included in the deal.

    Ran thru 3/4" birch ply like hot knife thru butter and 1/2" MDF not a whine.

    Gosh don't even want to put the frued blade on as this thing cuts great not one tear out on the plywood can not believe this saw.

    1-1/2 red oak not a whimper.

    After using a 1980 model craftsman which is long gone

    Which mostly burnt it's way thru wood

    What a saw.

    Great tool great site.
    Okay rant over
    Not responsible for speeling mistakes
    Jeff

  • #2
    Depending on what Freud blade you have, if you install it on the 3650, you'll be even more impressed with how well the saw cuts. About the only thing I use the stock Ridgid blade for is ripping and crosscutting consruction grade lumber.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

    Comment


    • #3
      Definitely put your Freud blade on and keep the stock as a spare for high risk woods...whatever you were spinning before must have been in tough shape.
      Last edited by hewood; 02-26-2006, 08:56 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Too good to be true

        Don't the legs wobble?
        Isn't the arbor bad?
        Doesn't the stock blade suck?
        Doesn't the dust collection suck?
        Isn't the orange color ugly?
        Does the Herculift really work?
        Doesn't the fence lock out of square?
        Didn't the cheap plastic fence lever break?
        Isn't the splitter assy a PITA to remove and reinstall?
        Didn't you have 3 nuts and bolts left over?
        Anything I forgot?
        etc. etc. etc.
        Lorax
        "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Lorax
          Don't the legs wobble?
          Isn't the arbor bad?
          Doesn't the stock blade suck?
          Doesn't the dust collection suck?
          Isn't the orange color ugly?
          Does the Herculift really work?
          Doesn't the fence lock out of square?
          Didn't the cheap plastic fence lever break?
          Isn't the splitter assy a PITA to remove and reinstall?
          Didn't you have 3 nuts and bolts left over?
          Anything I forgot?
          etc. etc. etc.
          Yes you did, power switch don't work and how do I adjust the belt?
          SSG, U.S. Army
          Retired
          K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

          Comment


          • #6
            The switch is covered in my sig line, thanks to you.
            Belt should be replaced with a link-belt anyways.
            Lorax
            "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

            Comment


            • #7
              Replacing the TS-3650 belt means buying new pulleys. The 3650 uses machined pulleys that match the multi-rib belt, its a different animal from a v-belt altogether. My opinion is there would not be enough of a reduction in vibration (if any) to make it worth the expense for me.

              Lorax, have you (or anyone for that matter) swapped out the stock belt and pulleys for a link belt with v-pulleys? Was it worth it?
              ---------------
              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
              ---------------
              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
              ---------
              "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
              ---------
              sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                Well no

                Originally posted by Lorax
                Don't the legs wobble? NO
                Isn't the arbor bad? No
                Doesn't the stock blade suck? NO
                Doesn't the dust collection suck? Maybe
                Isn't the orange color ugly? NO
                Does the Herculift really work? Yes
                Doesn't the fence lock out of square? No
                Didn't the cheap plastic fence lever break? No
                Isn't the splitter assy a PITA to remove and reinstall? NO
                Didn't you have 3 nuts and bolts left over? Was I supposed to have some left over
                Anything I forgot? Yep back fence does not sit down good unless you fiddle with it
                etc. etc. etc.
                Not responsible for speeling mistakes
                Jeff

                Comment


                • #9
                  Freud Blade

                  Originally posted by BadgerDave
                  Depending on what Freud blade you have, if you install it on the 3650, you'll be even more impressed with how well the saw cuts. About the only thing I use the stock Ridgid blade for is ripping and crosscutting consruction grade lumber.
                  Well have a low end one wife was standing next to me as she bought the saw so could not get the higher dollar price one with her looking at me holding a $100.00 blade

                  Well it is the Freud Diablo 60 tooth Z

                  Any good?
                  Last edited by Reef12; 02-27-2006, 07:51 AM.
                  Not responsible for speeling mistakes
                  Jeff

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Miss your nap today, Bob?

                    Originally posted by Bob D.
                    Replacing the TS-3650 belt means buying new pulleys. The 3650 uses machined pulleys that match the multi-rib belt, its a different animal from a v-belt altogether. My opinion is there would not be enough of a reduction in vibration (if any) to make it worth the expense for me.

                    Lorax, have you (or anyone for that matter) swapped out the stock belt and pulleys for a link belt with v-pulleys? Was it worth it?
                    It was a tongue-in-cheek continuation of posts # 4 & 5. It is so rare to find a new 3650 owner that doesn't find something to nit-pick, I just thought I would check that Reef hadn't missed something. Oh yeah. The instructions suck!
                    Lorax
                    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yeah, I guess that was lost on me.

                      Sorry
                      ---------------
                      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                      ---------------
                      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                      ---------
                      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                      ---------
                      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        OK. Dumb question: Why is the Rigid TS3650 so maligned?

                        I finally got my TS-Aligner Jr. And checked out my 3650 last weekend. Originally, I set up the saw using just an adjustable square and a straight edge and level. The TS-A Jr. showed me that the table slots were parallel with each other to within 0.001", the fence was parallel with the slots to within 0.003" and sits perpendicular to the blade AND the table. The arbor run out was also about 0.003". The high spot on the blade was the high spot on the blade, not a crapy arbor. My arbor was not one of the ones with the bum shoulder, either.

                        I didn’t have any problems aligning the wings. The surface has stayed nice and "rustless" with a good cleaning and a coat of paste wax before I start my Saturday or Sunday sawdust fest.

                        Oh, yeah, after I adjusted it per the instructions, the Hercu-Lift works like a champ.

                        Now, if I could elevate my skill level to match that of the table, I’d start posting some pics.

                        The only beef I have is the power switch. I wish there was a knee paddle or bar instead of the little tiny red-rocker. Has anyone replaced the switch with a magnetic one or one with a knee paddle? Would you kindly share details, pleas?
                        Ian Wilson

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "The only beef I have is the power switch. I wish there was a knee paddle or bar instead of the little tiny red-rocker. Has anyone replaced the switch with a magnetic one or one with a knee paddle? Would you kindly share details, pleas?"
                          Ian,
                          I replaced the stock switch with a magnetic contactor type from Surpluscenter.com.

                          We have frequent power blips here and after a few instances of being in the middle of a rip cut and suddenly being in the dark and having the saw come back to life, I had to do something.
                          It doesn't make the switch any easier to reach, but I like it a lot better. I mounted it to the plate that the stock switch was on and bent the plate a bit to get the pushbuttons more forward. After a bit of use it's second nature to find the Off button easily. I am thinking of glueing a wooden knob to the Off button to make it even easier to find when needed quickly.
                          HTH,
                          ken
                          Poplar Branch Wood Crafts

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            saw switch

                            i have installed a new switch on my 3650 from th reitech company

                            this is the second time i have used this switch (i had installed this switch on my delta cabinet saw with good success. you can view
                            switch on their website on reitech (under products) its a little pricey
                            i paid approx $150.00 but it is well worth it. i purchased it locally
                            you can touch the switch with your knee or hand on any part
                            of the switch and will shut off the power, its worth a look i haveused this switch for many years with good results

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              1910.213(b)(3)

                              OSHA 29 CFR 1910.213(b)(3)

                              On applications where injury to the operator might result if motors were to restart after power failures, provision shall be made to prevent machines from automatically restarting upon restoration of power.

                              2005 - 01/31/2005 - Requirements for protecting against the automatic restart of low-voltage light-duty woodworking and metalworking equipment following an unscheduled electrical outage.

                              [Bob D. Note: This is public information from OSHA's website, I have not altered the content in any way, BUT, thanks to some idiots who have visited our forums recently, it looks as though Josh has been forced to implement software which filters out any word or portion thereof which might be inappropriate. That means that in the following letter the word A_ssociation (note the underscore to circumvent the filter)] has the first three characters replaced with asterisks. My thanks goes out to all the b_uttheads who have ruined this forum in this way. You have won because Josh has had to take some of our freedom away to prevent you from using foul language. I know this will make you happy. ]

                              This letter constitutes OSHA's interpretation only of the requirements discussed and may not be applicable to any situation not delineated within the original correspondence.

                              January 31, 2005

                              Gary M. Genga
                              CY Concepts
                              400 Stone Road
                              Rochester, NY 14616

                              Dear Mr. Genga:

                              Thank you for your May 10, 2004 letter to former ***istant Secretary of Labor, John Henshaw. Your letter was referred to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) Directorate of Enforcement Programs. We replied to your inquiry on August 19, 2004, however certain information has come to our attention that requires us to modify our initial response. This correspondence reflects the most current information that pertains to your inquiry, and supersedes our previous reply. You had specific questions regarding the requirements for the protection against the unexpected restart of woodworking and metalworking equipment following an unscheduled electrical outage. Your paraphrased inquiries and our responses follow.

                              Question: Is low voltage, light-duty equipment (115-volt, single-phase), such as band saws, sanders, and drill presses commonly found in wood and metal shops, required to protect against automatic restarting upon restoration of electrical power following an unscheduled interruption?

                              Answer: As you may know, the OSHA standard for woodworking equipment is found at 29 CFR 1910.213. This standard, including the provision at 1910.213(b)(3) requiring the prevention of automatic restarting of dangerous woodworking equipment following the restoration of power after an unscheduled interruption, applies to woodworking machinery regardless of its electrical power supply voltage. Tools used in metalworking (with the exception of mechanical power presses) do not have the same explicit requirement in the OSHA standards for protection against automatic restart, but, as with all electric equipment used in the workplace, are generally required to be listed and labeled by a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL). These NRTLs may have requirements addressing the issue of the prevention of automatic restarting in their listing and labeling criteria and testing protocols. If there are such requirements, OSHA has a provision, found at 29 CFR 1910.303(b)(2), that "listed or labeled equipment shall be used or installed in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling."

                              Additionally, certain equipment-specific ANSI standards have requirements that restoration of power following an interruption not create hazardous conditions. Two such examples of this are ANSI B11.8-2001 American National Standard — Safety Requirements for Manual Milling, Drilling, and Boring Machines with or without Automatic Control and ANSI B11.10-2003 American National Standard for Machine Tools — Safety Requirements for Metal Sawing Machines with or without Automatic Control. The National Fire Protection ***ociation (NFPA) Standard 79, Electrical Standard for Industrial Machinery (2002) also contains requirements for the prevention of the unintentional restarting of equipment following an interruption of power.1 National consensus standards often provide evidence of industry recognition of occupational hazards and of feasible means for abating the hazards.

                              Thank you for your interest in occupational safety and health. We hope you find this information helpful. Note that our enforcement guidance may be affected by changes to OSHA rules. Also, from time to time we update our guidance in response to new information. To keep apprised of such developments, you can consult OSHA's website at http://www.osha.gov. If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact the Office of General Industry Enforcement at (202) 693-1850.

                              Sincerely,

                              Richard E. Fairfax, Director
                              Directorate of Enforcement Programs

                              1 It should be noted, however, that this standard, NFPA 79, does not apply to fixed or portable tools that have been judged under the requirements of a NRTL. [ back to text ]

                              -------------------
                              Bob D: Of course OSHA does not apply to the home workshop, but the gremlins do not discriminate and will get you wherever you are
                              For anyone using woodworking equipment as part of their job, AND they have one or more employees, then Federal OSHA (or your State OSH plan) does apply.
                              Last edited by Bob D.; 03-10-2006, 01:07 PM.
                              ---------------
                              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                              ---------------
                              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                              ---------
                              "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                              ---------
                              sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                              Comment

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