Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How to use planer? Newbie

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How to use planer? Newbie

    Hi all,

    This weekend I set up my new Ridgid 6 1/8" planer. It went together very easily but I am glad I read here first as I needed someone ot help me flip it over as it is very heavy. Well now it is all set up and running beautifully so I tried to plane down some spalted poplar I was using for boxes. I put set the depth indicator to what I guessed was 1/32" and ran the piece over about 6 times and guess what....one side was much thicker then the other by a good 1/16". I put a machinist square across with the depth set to 0 and it seemed like the blade touched all the way alone so what is going on? I didn't run the piece along the fence so it should have just taken 1/32" off of the whole piece.

    So I guess the question is to start from the beginning. How do you use a jointer/planer to prepare you wood? Being new to woodworking I am sure I am screwing something up or checked the machine incorrectly.

    Really confused now.
    Thanks for the help!
    Stefan

  • #2
    Keep in mind a jointer (I assume that's what you have) is designed to give you a flat smooth side on a piece of wood. A planer is designed to reduce thickness evenly. The common comment is that a jointer will remove a certain amount of twist warp or wane on one side. You can flip it over and do the same on the other side, but the sides won't be parallel to each other. If you put a bowed board through a planer you will get a thinner bowed board out the other side. Most say that you really need both: a jointer to get one side flat. A planer to get the other side parallel. Many seem to get by with only a planer. That is what I have. There may be some out there who can advise you on how to accomplish what you want with just a jointer.

    Comment


    • #3
      Stefan,

      If your jointer is making the boards thinner on one side rather than on one end, your tables are not set properly.

      Here's an excerpt from the manual that may help.

      Bob R
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #4
        Stephan,

        A couple a questions:

        What shape was the board in to begin with? As Clovishound mentioned, if one side was thicker to begin with, it will maintain that difference.

        Is the difference in thickness (after using the jointer) gradual from one end of the board to the other or was it the last several inches where the delta start?

        How long was the board?

        To help get you started here is a link about using a jointer:
        http://www.newwoodworker.com/usejntr.html

        It was originally posted by Bob D in this thread:
        http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...hlight=jointer

        Hope this helps, good luck and welcome to the board.

        Comment


        • #5
          I hate when companies sell these products to people who don't understand what they buying. a JOINTER is nothing more than creating a flat edge at a 90 degree angle (assuming your setup creates the 90 degrees). A PLANER is just something that cuts across an item on plane.

          What this person should have purchased was a THICKNESS PLANER. It cuts on 1 plane (assuming the table and knives are equal distance) and the result is a flat piece of wood. Transfer the wood to the jointer to get 4- 90 degree angles...a.k.a...square stock.

          A JOINTER will never produce parallel unless the rough stock is already parallel. I have found 90% is not.

          David

          Comment


          • #6
            "I hate when companies sell these products to people who don't understand what they buying."

            I don't understand your 'hate' for manufacturers here. What do they have to do with the purchasers knowledge of the tool? I guess (based on your comment above) that we will all have to start producing some credential proving that we know how to use a tool before we are allowed to purchase one.

            I do agree that a jointer is not designed to produce parallel faces on a board. And that it can not be counted on to create a face that is square to an edge, the width to thickness ratio (say for an example 1x6" board) is not great enough to give results with acceptable accuracy working with the 1" edge on the jointer's fence.

            From the thread initiators post I can not determine if the unevenness he is asking about is across the width of the board or the length. Either way I don't believe a jointer can not be counted on to correct the condition.
            Last edited by Bob D.; 03-02-2006, 12:55 PM.
            "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
            John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by hte2work
              .. a planar cuts on 1 plane (assuming the table and knives are equal distance) and the result is a flat piece of wood. Transfer the wood to the jointer to get 4- 90 degree angles...a.k.a...square stock.

              David
              David,

              I do it slightly different than you describe. I use the jointer to square up one face and then an adjacent edge, then go to the planar to make the other face parallel, then to the table saw to "accurately rough cut" then possibly back to the jointer to complete what I describe as accurately dimensioning lumber.

              Jerry
              It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bob D
                I do agree that a jointer is not designed to produce parallel faces on a board. [B
                And that it can not be counted on to create a face that is square to an edge[/B],
                the width to thickness ratio (say for an example 1x6" board) is not great enough to give results with acceptable accuracy working with the 1" edge on the jointer's fence.
                I gotta disagree with you here Bob. That is one of the primary functions of a jointer. If you plane the 6" face until it is flat and smooth, then run that face against the fence to joint the edge, you will have a perfect 90. Assuming of course that your fence is set to 90.
                Last edited by Lorax; 03-02-2006, 08:35 AM.
                Lorax
                "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think the terminology problem was probably created by Ridgid. They now refer to the JP0610 as a jointer / planer (see the link below):

                  http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/Stationa...ools/index.htm

                  I was looking for blades in one of the HD stores and asked an employee where the jointer blades could be found and he said "Oh, you mean the planer blades". I didn't bother to explain the difference, but they didn't have any, regardless of what they call it.

                  Bob R

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lorax
                    I gotta disagree with you here Bob. That is one of the primary functions of a jointer. If you plane the 6" face until it is flat and smooth, then run that face against the fence to joint the edge, you will have a perfect 90. Assuming of course that your fence is set to 90.
                    Lorax, I understand and agree with what you say 100%. Let me try to explain my scenario again.

                    I do not believe that it is possible to accurately square the face (width) to an edge with a jointer without running the board through again to square the edge to the face (which is what happens in the method you gave, and is the correct way).

                    I can run a face of a board through the jointer and get a flat surface, then as you said place the freshly jointed face against the fence (which for this discussion is assumed to be sq. with the bed) and then joint the edge to be square with the face.

                    My statement is based on NOT jointing the edge to the face, but the face to an edge.

                    I know this sounds like I am splitting hairs but the order of operations makes a difference, and if you leave out the last step in your (the correct) method, and just joint the face with an edge running against the fence, I say you do not have enough of a reference surface (that 3/4" edge on the fence) to square the face of the board to.
                    "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      [quote=Bob D.] My statement is based on NOT jointing the edge to the face, but the face to an edge. quote]
                      I thought that was what you meant, but I thought it might confuse some of our less experienced buddies.
                      Lorax
                      "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Scratch "hate" and replace it with "dislike".

                        With each purchase there is a little booklet which describes what this tool will do. Each tool has limits. You don't want to take an orbital sander and try to sand a 4/4 board to 3/4 would you? You can, but you are trying to get an even thickness. Hence, a thickness planer would be better suited for the job. Better results and consistant thickness.

                        I do believe the person who started this thread could not square a board. Most likely he went to the store, browsed a bit and saw a jointer/planer. Since he is a newbie (self proclaimed), he saw planer and thought it would be good enough for the job. Now he can't get square stock.

                        Imagine going to the store to buy corn. Quickly looking at labels you pick up a can that says corn, but when you get home you find this pureed mess of maize. You bought creamed corn, when you wanted kernels of corn. Both say they are corn, but they are indeed different.

                        My point is (yes I have one), there are many ways to square stock. I am not saying you cannot get square stock with a jointer. I have squared 1X2's on it and 1X3's on it. It can be done. I don't argue with that. It does take skill to do so. With a thickness planer, it is really simple. It slides through and it is done. I prefer a tool that make the job easier. In this case, for someone brand new, a thickness planer makes life easy.

                        I like to plane first and joint second. I plane to thickness, rough cut to size and then joint it. I feel it is a better way, but I won't argue if you like your way. Half the fun of wood working is figuring out on your own anyway. Nothing feels better than taking nasty narly wood, planing it down to reveal a beautiful grain and turning it into something nice. Buying things it easy. Building it is truely fun.

                        David

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Wow thanks for all the help! Sorry if I created a firestorm but my understanding (professed newbie here) is that I could use the jointer take off an even amount from one face as long as that face was less then the width of the blades (in one pass that is).

                          I did find the culprit, the fence mount and the table were not level with each other. I adjusted it as Bob R pointed out and bingo works fine. Newbie lesson learned....take the time to double and triple check alignment.

                          Thanks everyone for the help and opinions!
                          Stefan

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Stefan, also, you mentioned that you were not holding the wood against the fence. Freehanding across the blades like that can very easily cause your wood to cut more from one side than the other by not having equal pressure across the wood onto the jointer bed. Always hold the wood down and against the fence. When you have a flat side put that side against the fence and joint one edge. You will have a square corner from then on. Cut your thickness on a planer or tablesaw and then cut your width on the saw. You will have 4 square corners to your wood.
                            info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              planer question:

                              I was interested in woodworking so I went out and bought some books and tools and started learning. I've made a lot of mistakes along the way but each one taught me something I didn't know before. If I'd waited till I understood a tool before I bought it I'd never have gotten started.

                              I think when one side of a board is higher than the other it means the fence isn't square to the table.

                              Maryjo

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X