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  • New member with some thoughts and questions

    Hello all. I am new to this forum and really enjoy all the great info here. Please forgive me if I ramble on, I just wanted to babble for a while. I am not new to woodworking but AM new to table saw use. I have always used my radial arm saw to build various projects with pretty satisfactory success but recently bought a TS3650. I am hoping to get years of enjoyment out of it. After reading several posts, I am a little nervous about a table saw and safety as I truly value all my fingers. My dad is a retired cabinet maker and has shaved the edge of his finger with a table saw cutting a damp board. Scary.

    I am wanting to make a router table and have a question. How do you adjust the depth of cut when using a router table? Would you have to detach the router for adjustment or is there some type of mechanism that raises and lowers it, sort of like the blade on a table saw? And also, it seems like changing bits would be a pain trying to work through the hole in the table? Any thoughts or advise would be greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    Chester

    Welcome to the forum. Several router manufacturers offer through the base (or table) height adjustment on their newer models, Milwaukee, the new Freud and the soon to be released Ridgid to mention a few. You use the course adjustment for ballpark setting and fine-tune it with the fine adjustment. I currently have the Milwaukee 2 ¼ Bodygrip model installed in my table and haven’t found the need to drill a hole through the table to use the above table adjustment, it simply turns the same finger fine-tune control and I find it is very easy to bend down and fine tune it with the adjustment from there. There are several aftermarket adjustment mechanisms on the market also, but the price on them can easily exceed the price of a new router. As far as changing bits, I find it is easy to just drop the router out and change the bit on top of the table, with my Milwaukee for example, you unlock the clamp and press a button and it drops out, 5 seconds at most.

    Woodslayer

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree with Woodslayer. I also have a Milwaukee and like it, though I do not use it mounted in the table much, I use my PC Router. As Woodslayer said, the price of most of the router adjustment gizmos are high. I choose to spend that money on a second router, which is how I came to have the Milwaukee.
      ---------------
      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
      ---------------
      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
      ---------
      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
      ---------
      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        I guess it's about how much you use your router table setup, and how much money you have laying around.

        I have an old makita 3hp plunge router that has adjustable stops. So the procedure for adjusting is a little tiresom but it works. I Need to make a custom piece of moulding or cabinet door once in a while but not very often.

        So it's ok.

        If I had the money would get one of these type of deals:

        http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=10777

        Comment


        • #5
          I just got the Bench Dog cabinet, fence, and top. You can see it here:
          http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?FamilyID=2075
          You can buy the pieces seperate, and the instructions for mounting the top on your own cabinet are pretty good. I really like the fence, too. The cabinet itself is no big shakes, but I like the wheels/leveling feet mechanism, so I just decided to get the cabinet along with everything else!!
          The Porter-Cable 960 router I have uses a similar height adjustment mechanism to the Makita. For bit changes, I can either drop the router motor or push it all the way up and change the bit from above the table. I prefer to push the motor up instead of removing it, just because it saves the 1 minute of putting the motor back.

          To set the depth of cut, I'll hold the square up to the bit and eyeball the height of the bit, then do a test cut. Fine adjustments are all that's needed at that point.

          Oh, and welcome to the forums!!!!
          I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

          Comment


          • #6
            the table saw can be a dangerous tool, however, if you use push blocks feather boards and are just aware of the blade it is no more dangerous than the radial arm saw.
            In the last couple of projects i have picked up a couple of routers to go with my inherited craftsman. i have the pc combo from HD and a 3 1/4 or 1/2 milwaukee. i use the milwaukee in my cmt industrio router table, which i wish i would have purchased before i almost took my knuckles out with kickback on a small home made router table turning raised panels. i use 2-3 feather boards now and haven't had a problem since. i know that i spent a fair amount of money on my router setup, but i feel more comfortable using my tools. there are many great homemade router table plans out there, i would make sure that i built one with the ability of using safety accessories and big enough that you can do anything on. that is just my experience.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Chester
              Hello all. I am new to this forum and really enjoy all the great info here. Please forgive me if I ramble on, I just wanted to babble for a while. I am not new to woodworking but AM new to table saw use. I have always used my radial arm saw to build various projects with pretty satisfactory success but recently bought a TS3650. I am hoping to get years of enjoyment out of it. After reading several posts, I am a little nervous about a table saw and safety as I truly value all my fingers. My dad is a retired cabinet maker and has shaved the edge of his finger with a table saw cutting a damp board. Scary.

              I've been bit by a router, but not a table saw. I use the blade guard as much as possible, along with splitter. I find myself using push sticks and blocks more and more often, but the best defense is offense. Look for ways to make your cutting safer. Many years ago I would cut first, think about safety afterwards. That has changed.

              In regards to the router that bit me...I was routing a dovetail dado for a slide. It caught a hidden knot and hopped a small amount off the router table. In the flash of a second, I found the push block rotated around my hand and my index, middle and ring finger slid through the bit. While it did not remove any flesh, it did leave dovetail bit marks in the fingers. Each time I use the table, I focus more and more about keeping a firm grip on the blocks.

              No matter what tool it is...it is designed to remove material. The tool does not care what the material it is, so keep that in mind before you turn the power on.

              David

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for all the advise and the welcome everyone. I am going to begin a new project this weekend and use the new saw. Can't wait to get started. I haven't tried it yet but will the 3650 do a 3/4 in dado?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Just finished up a DVD shelf unit. Actually did 23/32w x 5/16d dadoes (using "3/4" ply instead of solid lumber), but did 10 each for each side piece. TS3650 worked flawlessly.
                  Practicing at practical wood working

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Chester
                    I am wanting to make a router table and have a question. How do you adjust the depth of cut when using a router table? Would you have to detach the router for adjustment or is there some type of mechanism that raises and lowers it, sort of like the blade on a table saw? And also, it seems like changing bits would be a pain trying to work through the hole in the table? Any thoughts or advise would be greatly appreciated.
                    Many people have spent anywhere from $150 to $300 for devices that allow you to raise or lower the router (thus the bit) while in the table. I didn't. I have an Hitachi M12V in my router table and I DO NOT have a production shop. I don't find it all that unhandy (or time consuming) to lift the router (and the plate it is attached to) out of the table and do my bit changes and height adjustments on top of the table. If I had a production shop where every minute was money AND if I used the router a lot in that environment then I might consider the $$$ outlay. But for a home shop, I can spend that money on something more useful. I don't need a gloat.

                    gator

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I purchased the new PC 890 series. This is nice because it has a tool that you can buy or get with the combo kit (which is how i got it) that you can raise and lower from the table top. I purchased a Woodhaven table and had them drill the hole for this adjustment tool. I works like butter !!!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        " I works like butter !!!! "

                        Does that mean it slips ?
                        ---------------
                        Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                        ---------------
                        “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                        ---------
                        "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                        ---------
                        sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                        Comment

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