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  • #16
    Not happy at all

    My new Forrest WWII blade came in the mail this week, and this morning I was able to find time to mount the blade. I went after the table with a rag and kerosene to clean the gunk off, and I also applied a coating of Johnsons wax. Double checked the blade/miter slot measurements. Parallel to less than .001". Runout on the blade is around .003 TIR. Fence is nearly parallel, about .003" wider after the blade.

    Run a couple test cuts, and the finish is nearly as smooth as glass! HOORAY!!!

    So why am I not happy?

    Because when I loosened the factory blade, using the Ridgid supplied wrenches, the wrench on the arbor (left hand) was not a proper fit, and it rounded over a corner on the flats of the arbor! It left a nice (NOT!) long groove of shiny metal on hte corner.

    Not happy at all that the provided tools are not the proper size for the flats and/or the arbor is such soft metal that it rounded over so easily.

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    • #17
      Dave, I feel your pain on this one. I also had the same problem and have since used crescent wrenches for my blade changes so that I won't have to change out my arbor anytime soon by rounding it completely over! I asked about this over a year ago on this forum and no one seemed to have the same issue so I just chalked it up to something I did wrong!

      WWS
      Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

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      • #18
        DaveNay and WWS
        How tight did you tighten the old blade when you put it on?
        Lorax
        "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Lorax
          DaveNay and WWS
          How tight did you tighten the old blade when you put it on?
          I didn't. This occured when removing the OEM blade.

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          • #20
            I have the nice stamped steel crap wrenches that came with the saw. They are in like new condition because I only used them twice. I use an open end valve tappet wrench on the arbor side because it is thinner than a standard wrench, and I use a std open end wrench on the arbor nut.

            You can find the 4 piece valve tappet wrench set at Sears for about $25, I believe they are available individually also. Also, they are guaranteed forever!

            Craftsman 4 pc. Wrench Set, Tappet, SAE
            Sears item #00944189000 Mfr. model #44189

            4 pc. standard tappet set with tote. For limited clearance areas requiring a thin-head wrench. Adjust tappets on auto engines. Sizes 3/8 x 7/16, 1/2 x 9/16, 5/8 x 11/16, 3/4 x 7/8 in.
            "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
            John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Lorax
              DaveNay and WWS
              How tight did you tighten the old blade when you put it on?
              I did not put my blade on. I had a buddy helping me assemble the saw and he did that step. I admit he may have gotten a bit strong with it, but I was concerned that it could happen again. That is why I changed to different wrenches and the Ridgid wrenches are taking up space in a land fill somewhere now.

              Bob, thanks for the tip. I may have to go take a look, as the wrench I use on the arbor side is a pretty tight fit being as it is so big.

              WWS
              Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

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              • #22
                I was reviewing posts & ran across this post.

                Originally posted by tg3k View Post
                Why transfer what could be a critical setting from one instrument (the protractor) to another (the bevel square) to another (the blade)? I use a 45° plastic drafting triangle directly on the (unplugged) saw blade. Cuts down on the potential to multiply a small error into a bigger one.

                That said, I do agree with your advice about using the indicator on the saw itself as a rough guess, and not an absolute setting. Although, I guess it depends how accurate you want the joint to be. If you're building a planter for the patio it's probably not as critical as if you're building a fine hardwood jewelry box.

                My $0.02 on the original poster's question is that your fence is not aligned correctly, and your push stick is still allowing the piece to move around in ways it's not supposed to. Featherboards or a good pushblock like the Grripper would be my suggestion (after tuning the saw). I get much better results with the Grripper and MJ splitter on my TS3650 than I ever did with the factory guard (a hazard IMHO) and a push stick.
                Answer
                I was trying to cover all the bases.

                But what if I want to cut a bevel at 22.5 degrees can I check to see if the blade is set at 22.5 degrees with a 45 degree triangle. As to setting the splitter I would rip a piece of 3/4" plywood long enough to go through the length of the splitter with enough to go completely to out in front of the blade a ways with about 6"-8" left uncut & keep trying & tweeking the splitter until the gauge board will slide easily by the blade & splitter with the saw shut off.

                Just my 2 cents worth.
                Last edited by VLL; 02-11-2007, 06:12 PM.

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                • #23
                  Re: Assistance please!

                  Valve Tappet Wrenches

                  Sears-Craftsman can be bought individually through the Craftsman tool catalog or online, but the set is a much better deal. You can also buy the same wrenches under the K-D name at good auto parts stores. At industrial tool dealers you'll find them under Armstrong or Proto. There's just NO way I will pay the insane prices that Mac and Snap-on dealers running about in fancy trucks want for them.

                  By the way sometimes you'll see them on "FleaBay" but watch the shipping fees.

                  My 1 cent worth LOL

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                  • #24
                    Tappet Wrenches

                    I too had the problem with rolling over the edges on my arbor during the first blade change last year. I figured it was my own fault for "cranking" the blade on and then attempting to remove it.

                    More recently I just tighten the WWII and Freud 508 (805?) Stacked Dado just enough to be snug. This way I won't overtighten again.

                    I'll have to check out the Tappet Wrenches. What sizes do I actually need to perform blade changes?
                    Stay well and play well.
                    Skip

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                    • #25
                      Re: Assistance please!

                      Skip

                      I wish I knew the right sizes but I don't own that model table saw. You can take a ruler and carefully measure the openings of the junky wrenches. I hope you don't need them in metric sizes. They are made, but you'll most likely be looking at Mac or Snap-on and they are big $$$. Maybe someone that owns that table saw knows the correct sizes and will post.

                      If your Sears doesn't have what you need, check around good (not the big chain) auto parts stores. Many of them sell or can get KD brand which is a good tool line and won't cost you an arm & leg. You can also check in your phone book under "Tools - Hand" and under Industrial Supplies.

                      http://www.kd-tools.com/65114128.htm (Their catalog info on tappet wrenches - KD Tools)
                      Last edited by Woussko; 02-12-2007, 12:00 AM.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Assistance please!

                        I may just take the arbor nut down to Sears with me to make sure I get the proper wrench. The stamped steel things that came w/the saw are just not that great. Besides, I lost the wrench for my Dewalt router....I need to get something that'll be dedicated to that!! Would a tappet wrench work for that too? What's the difference between a tappet wrench and a standard wrench? Sorry for the dumb questions!
                        I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Assistance please!

                          Guess I lucked out - the stock blade wrenches have worked fine for me. I had the blade on and off a dozen times or more yesterday (making ZCIs) and never had a problem.

                          - djb
                          sigpic

                          A Democracy is 2 wolves and 1 sheep voting on what to have for lunch.

                          Restore the Republic.

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                          • #28
                            Re: Assistance please!

                            Sandy and others

                            A tappet wrench has an open head that's thin. Normally they have about 10 inches end to end and some (most) are double ended. Some were made single ended. The idea is to have a thinner head than a regular open end wrench. Some tool companies call them THIN HEAD wrenches rather than tappet wrenches. This link will give you an idea about them.
                            http://www.mytoolstore.com/kd/kdspec24.html

                            Sandy
                            With your router, you may want another type of wrench. Are you needing the one to hold the spindle or the one for the collet nut, or both? Do you remember the opening sizes and about how think the heads were? A friend that has a big Milwaukee router found that he needed (2) 1-1/8" heavy head open end wrenches for it. The ones that came with it were made out of soft junk metal. I found him 2 good USA made ones. Try to give me the specs for what you would call the ideal wrenches and I'll see how close I can find for you. What model Dewalt router is it? I might be able to find out from Dewalt what sizes it needs. Sometimes for the collet nut & spindle, you may want some wild offsets depending on if it's in a table or not.

                            Maybe these pictures (not to scale) may help some. There are hand tools of about any type - design you would ever need. The hard part is finding just the right one for a given use.
                            Attached Files
                            Last edited by Woussko; 02-12-2007, 04:58 PM.

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                            • #29
                              Re: Assistance please!

                              It's a DW621 plunge router. It has a push-in lock device for the lower spindle. Only requires one wrench (while you try to hold the router, and keep the plunger in) to loosen/tighten the collet. The question is....what size is that freakin thing?!?! It's bigger than 3/4" but not sure what it takes.

                              OK! Finally found it at ServiceNet...it's part #761289-00 22mm. I'll just get a Craftsman.
                              Last edited by VASandy; 02-12-2007, 05:36 PM.
                              I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Assistance please!

                                Sandy

                                Good idea and look over the different wrenches they have at Sears. Looks like you need a 22mm size as I'm sure you figured. Do take the nut along just to be 1000% sure. You can also look at tappet wrenches while there. In my pictures it's the long thin one.

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