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  • Assistance please!

    Today, I finished assembling my new TS3650 table saw. Obviously, I need to fine tune all the alignments. The most noticable problem is shown in the attached picture. When I took a couple of test rips, I get a lot of blade gouging on the finished cuts. I believe that the problem is with the splitter/blade guard, but a looked it over carefully, and it does not appear to be binding in the kerf.

    Anyone willing to help me outwith some pointers? I am perfectly willing to accept that my problem is with my skills, and not a mechanical issue.

    Thanks!
    Dave
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Did you check to make sure the splitter is aligned properly all the way along? Mine was cocked just a tiny bit to one side. After several attempts to get it to be completely straight, I finally came up with a way to do it. It involves two long straight-edges laid along each side of the blade (and tight up to it), and about an hour of trying to tighten the two bolts and keep the darn thing STRAIGHT!!! You may want to make sure no one's watching you while you do this, especially any young ears!! As far as I can tell, it takes a Naval degree of cursing to get the thing to line up straight.

    Just a thought of something to try. Other folks here will probably have better ideas!
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

    Comment


    • #3
      Possible causes

      Hi and welcome.
      That looks like some pretty gnarly wood you were cutting there. Did you have a straight, flat edge to run against the fence? If not, that's your problem. If yes, then probably the fence needs to be heeled out a little to keep the board from binding between the fence and back of the blade. Also you should use a featherboard to keep the stock tight against the fence (assuming you weren't). If you are using the original blade, you should upgrade, but even the stock blade cuts better than that.

      Heeled out = The fence should be "cocked" to the right from front to back of the blade about .005"

      OK BD, your turn
      Lorax
      "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Lorax
        That looks like some pretty gnarly wood you were cutting there.
        It is actually a length of 2x12 doug fir (actually measures 2") that I had laying around the farm shop. The blade is the stock blade. I will measure the blade/fence parallelism tomorrow. I did not use a feather board for the cur shown, just a push stick.

        Thanks,
        Dave

        Comment


        • #5
          " ...a length of 2x12 doug fir (actually measures 2") that I had laying around the farm shop..."

          Not a good test subject in my opinion. Did you at least eyeball this piece to see if it was reasonably straight? Anything that has been laying around on or near the floor in the typical shop environment is likely to have picked up some moisture from the concrete or dirt floor which could cause it to behave abnormally when cutting. They may also be some stress locked into the board which caused the condition you describe.

          Also, it looks like you were ripping a 45 bevel on this board, is that true?

          Last but not least, you state right off that you need to " fine tune all the alignments " , have/had you made any adjustments to align the blade, fence, and splitter yet, other than those performed during assembly?
          "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
          John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by VASandy
            Did you check to make sure the splitter is aligned properly all the way along? Mine was cocked just a tiny bit to one side. After several attempts to get it to be completely straight, I finally came up with a way to do it. It involves two long straight-edges laid along each side of the blade (and tight up to it), and about an hour of trying to tighten the two bolts and keep the darn thing STRAIGHT!!! You may want to make sure no one's watching you while you do this, especially any young ears!! As far as I can tell, it takes a Naval degree of cursing to get the thing to line up straight.

            Just a thought of something to try. Other folks here will probably have better ideas!

            Good read their ROFLMAO

            A Naval degree in cursing

            It is a bear to line up I think I got real lucky and this is the only part that I did not need to well Curse at it

            The 2 side wings and back fence now that is a different ball game.

            Good luck Dave Nay on the saw it is a good one once the tweaks are applied
            Not responsible for speeling mistakes
            Jeff

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Bob D.
              Also, it looks like you were ripping a 45 bevel on this board, is that true?

              Last but not least, you state right off that you need to " fine tune all the alignments " , have/had you made any adjustments to align the blade, fence, and splitter yet, other than those performed during assembly?
              LOL...I guess this was my round-about method of asking what other adjustments need to be made? I have never owned a table saw for use on cabinetry...just an old cheap Craftsman contractor that I used to rip sheets of OSB and plywood.

              Yes, the rip was at a 45 bevel, I was checking the accuracy of the bevel indicator as shipped to see if I needed to adjust it. (rip board at 45, asseble into right angle and check with machinists square).

              Thanks for all the suggestions so far! I am going to check the fence again today, and try some other wood that I know is clean and dry.

              Dave

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by VASandy
                It involves two long straight-edges laid along each side of the blade (and tight up to it), and about an hour of trying to tighten the two bolts and keep the darn thing STRAIGHT!!!
                Hmmmm...this gives me an idea.....clamp a 2x4 on either side of the blade, and then clamp those to the splitter. Then tighten the two bolts.

                Dave

                Comment


                • #9
                  Clamping like that will not solve the problem. The splitter is thin and will flex. once tight and the clamps removed it could be 10 degrees off square and ruined with a permanent twist to it.
                  info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Don't worry about the tilt degree indicator its just to get you close. Set a bevel square to the bevel you want using a protractor & use the bevel square to set your blade to the desired bevel.

                    Make sure your blade aligns up with your left miter slot & the fence lines up with the same slot & blade.

                    Technically both miter-slots should be aligned with each other but this is not always the case. The reason I suggested using the left miter slot is because it is the slot most often used with the miter gage.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by VLL
                      ...Set a bevel square to the bevel you want using a protractor & use the bevel square to set your blade to the desired bevel.
                      ...
                      Why transfer what could be a critical setting from one instrument (the protractor) to another (the bevel square) to another (the blade)? I use a 45° plastic drafting triangle directly on the (unplugged) saw blade. Cuts down on the potential to multiply a small error into a bigger one.

                      That said, I do agree with your advice about using the indicator on the saw itself as a rough guess, and not an absolute setting. Although, I guess it depends how accurate you want the joint to be. If you're building a planter for the patio it's probably not as critical as if you're building a fine hardwood jewelry box.

                      My $0.02 on the original poster's question is that your fence is not aligned correctly, and your push stick is still allowing the piece to move around in ways it's not supposed to. Featherboards or a good pushblock like the Grripper would be my suggestion (after tuning the saw). I get much better results with the Grripper and MJ splitter on my TS3650 than I ever did with the factory guard (a hazard IMHO) and a push stick.
                      Last edited by tg3k; 03-22-2006, 01:47 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Runout

                        I picked up a dial indicator today during lunch from Harbor Freight. After....uh, borrowing...some 3/4 x 3/8 aluminum stock from work, I rigged up a fixture for the saw. 20 minutes later, I have concluded that I have .005" TIR on my blade. As I mentioned before, this is the OEM Ridgid blade. My next step is going to be to unmount the blade and make sure there are no burrs or debris between the blade and the arbor shoulder (good time to check if I have the bum arbor too). After that, I am going to mount the new thin kerf blade I plan on buying tomorrow morning.

                        I didn't even bother to check the blade/miter slot/rip fence parallelism yet.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I don't recommend people do this, but my splitter is in the attic and it's the best place for it. I haven't used it since the day I took it off.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DaveNay
                            I picked up a dial indicator today during lunch from Harbor Freight. After....uh, borrowing...some 3/4 x 3/8 aluminum stock from work, I rigged up a fixture for the saw. 20 minutes later, I have concluded that I have .005" TIR on my blade. As I mentioned before, this is the OEM Ridgid blade. My next step is going to be to unmount the blade and make sure there are no burrs or debris between the blade and the arbor shoulder (good time to check if I have the bum arbor too). After that, I am going to mount the new thin kerf blade I plan on buying tomorrow morning.

                            I didn't even bother to check the blade/miter slot/rip fence parallelism yet.

                            Sorry to interject the inevitable stupid question here......

                            what's "TIR" and how do I measure it?
                            I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by VASandy
                              Sorry to interject the inevitable stupid question here......

                              what's "TIR" and how do I measure it?
                              TIR = Total Indicator Runout

                              If your readings go from -.003 to +.004 your TIR would be .007
                              If your readings go from 0 to -.020 your TIR would be .020 etc.
                              Lorax
                              "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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