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  • #16
    Lorax
    I appreciate the reply and now understand the acronym TEFC. I did search before posting on here and other forums and recall reading Ridgid had a lifetime warranty of some sort so I trusted what I read instead of calling HD and asking directly. Do you know what is covered under the warranty on the TS2400? I agree that "throwaway" was a slightly strong way to describe the inferiority of these units to cabinet types but you didn't address my main concern about cut accuracy in your reply. How much more accurate is the TS3650 to the TS2400? What calibration adjustments are unavailable on the TS2400?

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    • #17
      You're welcome, and thanks for not getting all bent out of shape about my smarta$$ sarcastic answers. Yesterday was not one of my better days, if you know what I mean. I'll get back to you on your questions later (I need a nap). Someone else may jump in in the meantime.
      Lorax
      "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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      • #18
        Originally posted by yldouright

        papadan
        I thought I clearly stated that accuracy was my first priority after budget so I don't understand the recommendation for a reciprocating saw or jigsaw. Are you saying that there are reciprocating technologies available in my modest budget which have superior accuracy on straight cuts to the table saws mentioned here?! If so, please point me to them, I'm very interested
        Not saying anything about superior, but you can clamp a straight edge to the aluminum and cut a straight line with a reciprocating, Circular, or jig saw without a problem. The TS2400 is as accurate a saw as you will find. EDIT: Forgot to mention, the factory edge on a sheet of 3/4" MDF makes an Exccellent straight edge for cutting.
        Last edited by papadan; 03-29-2006, 06:33 PM.
        info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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        • #19
          Originally posted by yldouright
          Lorax
          I appreciate the reply and now understand the acronym TEFC. I did search before posting on here and other forums and recall reading Ridgid had a lifetime warranty of some sort This is the link to the 2400 which you can follow to the warranty http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/TS2400LS-Table-Saw/ so I trusted what I read instead of calling HD and asking directly HD does not warranty Ridgid tools nor are they a service center for Ridgid tools. Do you know what is covered under the warranty on the TS2400? I agree that "throwaway" was a slightly strong way to describe the inferiority of these units to cabinet types but you didn't address my main concern about cut accuracy in your reply. How much more accurate is the TS3650 to the TS2400? What calibration adjustments are unavailable on the TS2400? I think the main advantage of the 3650 is the bigger table offering more support to the workpiece. Don't forget the difference in the motors. BTW I would think that cutting aluminum plate with a woodworking table saw would void the warranty anyway.
          10 characters
          Lorax
          "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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          • #20
            hey yldouright:

            Imight have a solution for you aluminum cutting needs.. go to this site
            http://www.eurekazone.org/images/gallery/signshop.html
            I bought one of these edge guides and i love it saves a lot of time and set up and if you look in ebay you can get them for about a $149.00...
            This link goes to the signshop guy who does aluminum signs.....
            This might help or not..

            William

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            • #21
              mrlttlman
              Yeah, I looked at buying a real quality hand saw/guide system but even if I could make it approach the quality of a mediocre contractor saw I still wouldn't be able to do edge routing (half cuts) as cleanly and accurately as I could with a table saw. I'm hoping to get edges clean, smooth and straight enough on my aluminum stock so that only edge filing is required.

              Lorax
              Thanks for the link. It sounds like you're saying the accuracy of the TS2400 is as good as the TS3650 and that they have the same calibration adjustments, correct? Why would aluminum cutting void a warranty on a table saw? It seems to me to be a perfectly legitimate material if industry standard saw blades are made for this material.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by yldouright
                mrlttlman
                Yeah, I looked at buying a real quality hand saw/guide system but even if I could make it approach the quality of a mediocre contractor saw I still wouldn't be able to do edge routing (half cuts) as cleanly and accurately as I could with a table saw. I'm hoping to get edges clean, smooth and straight enough on my aluminum stock so that only edge filing is required.

                Lorax
                Thanks for the link. It sounds like you're saying the accuracy of the TS2400 is as good as the TS3650 and that they have the same calibration adjustments, correct? Why would aluminum cutting void a warranty on a table saw? It seems to me to be a perfectly legitimate material if industry standard saw blades are made for this material.
                Direct drive motors cause more vibration than belt driven systems which translates to higher degrees of runout and scoring. It may be slight, but it's more pronounced. Both Wood and Popular WWing have touched on that aspect within the past year, and it was measurable. I'll repeat that the cut quality of the 2400 may be very good, and may be good enough, but the 3650 has an inherent design advantage in that regard.

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                • #23
                  Dudley Doright,
                  "Thanks for the link. It sounds like you're saying the accuracy of the TS2400 is as good as the TS3650 and that they have the same calibration adjustments, correct? "

                  What I said is what I said. I have a 3650. I don't have a 2400. Some here have 2400's, but not 3650's. I doubt if anyone here has both. Maybe someone who has used both can compare the relative accuracy of the two saws, otherwise we can only express opinions based on our research.

                  Why would aluminum cutting void a warranty on a table saw?

                  A quick call to Ridgid Customer Service or Tech Services would settle it.
                  Lorax
                  "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                  • #24
                    I have not used a 3650 either, just my 2400. I can set my fence for 23 3/16" and cut a piece of 3/4" furniture grade plywood and the finished piece is 23 3/16" wide. Does not matter what I cut or what size I set the fence for. The finished cut piece is the exact size I wanted and set the saw fence for. You can't get any more accurate than that. Before the start of each major project, I check out the whole saw just to make sure everything is square and calibrated correctly. I average a couple small adjustments per year, and they are normally the result of me dropping something on or hitting the fence with something by accident. In my opinion, you cannot find a saw more accurate than that. If anyone wants to mention that thier saw is accurate to 1/32" or 1/64" then so be it, but I have never found a need for those kind of measurements in anything I build, bird house to kithen cabinets to fine furniture.
                    info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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                    • #25
                      I have the 3650 and would be along the same lines as papadan. I may not be so good as to be making really nice kitchen cabinets, but have done fine with what I make and all my cuts are right where they should be. I have no complaints, although I am obviously not dragging it around to jobsites or such!
                      Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

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                      • #26
                        papadan
                        Those results are fine for wood but metalwork has a stricter standard. An 8 mil (~1/128") error will cause a serious job fit problem. This is compunded by the fact that aluminum threads will strip much more easily on misaligned parts when you apply your screws and the stock is much more expensive than plywood.

                        Lorax
                        A good umpire has to learn to commit to an answer even when he doesn't know for sure. Sounds like you might need to revisit harry Wendelstedt

                        hewood
                        That was the most helpful post so far. I didn't know that about direct drive motors on saws. It would be interesting to note if the vibration differences become greater when using harder material. The results may well be reversed depending on the material.

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                        • #27
                          yldouright, Maybe if you explain just what you are building with this aluminum, we could be of more help. I have been woodworking for about 5 years, I guess. I have been and am a metal worker since 1975. Everything from art pieces to building trailers to overhead cranes. You want some fun, build a crane with a span of 105', double girder with a trolley span of 18 ' and a capacity of 100 tons that must be within 1/16" in all directions and dead square. I design and build things like this on a regular basis. I tend to mix metal with my wood projects on a regular basis too. If you really have to have acurate cuts to 1/128" in aluminum or anything else, then you should be looking at CNC machines not a table saw. MHO
                          info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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                          • #28
                            papadan
                            I'm sure your experience is far greater than my own so I guess I should be depressed about your reply. The drilling and tapping aspect of this project is its own problem and separate from the fitting and cutting that I require to make these simple boxes. I could send you the mechanicals but the box is so simple that I can describe it step by step here so everyone can advise. I'm hoping CNC is overkill for the project below.

                            This project requires two boxes about 6" x 11" x 11" cleanly finished and the boxes need to be quite rigid and very closely fitted.

                            material-(4) 8mm x 300mm x 300mm rough cut extrusion and (1) 1/4" x 25" x 48" sheet

                            1. square up the 8mm thick extrusions to 280mm x 280mm
                            2. cut (8) 153mm x 283mm adjacent panels out of the 1/4" sheet
                            3. undercut a 3mm x 3mm channel on the top and bottom inside face of each

                            The resulting boxes will have a 3mm overlap which should add a little more rigidity. That's it.

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                            • #29
                              Right tool for the right job. You need a shear not a table saw.
                              SSG, U.S. Army
                              Retired
                              K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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                              • #30
                                Your talking aluminum here right? Straight edge and jig saw to cut all parts to aproximate size.Within 1/2 mm. Finish edges to exact size with a file, large b asterd file to rough and small to finish. Quick and easy on that size aluminum. Channels can be cut with a dremel tool and straight edge to the exact size and placement without any difficulty. You said sheet aluminum is 1/4" thick, right. If you don't have a mig welder take the pieces somewhere and have the boxes welded instead of drilling and tapping. You mentioned the tolerance had to be 1/ 128th of an inch, but all your specs are in Milimeters, so start there with a metric rule. LOL
                                info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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