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  • tile glue

    what is the best way to get old tile glue off of my bathroom walls?would appriciate any suggestions.
    thanks, chic.
    A fishing pole is the best cordless tool!

  • #2
    chic, is the mastic applied directly to the drywall, or on a cement/hardibacker board?? Do you plan to re-tile or something else? I only ask because this is not an easy task. If it is applied directly to the drywall I doubt that you can get the mastic off without damaging the drywall to a point of needing to be replaced. If it is on a cement board of some type you may be able to get a scraper and really go to town on it without too much damage.

    I suppose it would depend on how thick it is applied. Mastic that is fairly old (usually does not contain acrylic) and is on walls in a humid/wet area tends to yellow and become brittle. But I think you are looking at a difficult task. If you just plan to put on new tile, then I would just try to remove any mastic that is loose and then float new mastic over it and put on the new tiles.

    Just my $.02 worth.....

    WWS
    Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

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    • #3
      this house of mine is about 93 years old the wall i am doing is a plaster wall. i am using a wall paper scraper at the moment and you are right it is going to be a long and teadious task.I have already dug in a little deep and i suppose i can add plaster and smooth it out.but i am going to pull my wife in there and talk about maybe putting a differnt tile in?
      A fishing pole is the best cordless tool!

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      • #4
        Even with plaster you will have a hard time getting the mastic off without damaging the plaster IMHO. I have personally never tried with plaster, but do have a fair bit of experience with tile on other substrates. I am assuming that most of the walls are covered by tile and not just the bath area? Are the tiles covering most of the walls or just a couple feet high? I only ask trying to determine how much mastic will need to be removed. There is a chemical out there (the name escapes my mind at the moment) that can be used to help soften the mastic. It is similar to something used to help remove the glue from under a linoleum floor. But I do not think it can be used on anything but cement or it may also damage any other substrate. If I can find the name I will let you know.

        I am a bit biased at the moment as I just finished remodeling both my bathrooms (at the same time) so I am personally tired of them, but I suspect that the easiest way to do this will be to put up new tile. They have many styles out there these days that will fit most peoples needs/opinions. Or you can look into having some custom made, which is becoming more affordable although certain types you will not want to put in a wet area. If that is not a choice for your wife you will want to take this slowly and carefully to get down as much of the old mastic as possible and patch up the rest with plaster without doing much damage. Did you get all the old tile off without much trouble?

        WWS
        Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

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        • #5
          Yep, all the walls have the tile about 3 feet up from the floor . the more i scrap the more i think and the more tile keeps popping in my mind. later iam going to o to lowes and check out the differnt styles and applications for putting up new tile. thanks for your knowlage and experiance on this subject.
          john.
          A fishing pole is the best cordless tool!

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          • #6
            Not knowing the composition of the tile cement, it is really hard to guess the best method. If the stuff was really dry and almost brittle (like an ancient application), you could try to sand it down if it wasn't too thick. If it is newer and has a lastic feel to it, you might try using a heat gun. The latter shouldn't effect the plaster at all.

            I've found that sometimes heat will loosen some adhesives enough so that they come off better. Either way, it won't be easy.

            I have an 1887 home that we recently purchased and one of the previous owners had done a lot of remodeling... most of which was just "get-er-done" poor workmanship stuff. Whoever did it, used an abundance of glue and adhesives and just tacking drywall over the existing walls. I'm now going through a remodel and trying to bring some level of quality to task, including removal and restoration of hardwood trim, etc. So far we've got the two bathrooms done and are in the middle of doing the kitchen. It's tough and all too often I run into "I'd love to get ahold of this guy" tasks. Sometimes taking down the drywall completely and getting back to the old plaster and repairing it as it should have been done in the first place.

            My current project is removal of the oak plank that was used as the old kitchen's wainscot. It is attached with thick adhesive which has to be removed. Then I'm going to strip the oak of its overly thick and uneven varnish, refinish it and put it back up. That adhesive is probably the biggest time consumer.

            CWS

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            • #7
              tile glue

              Hi i am not an expert here but here goes. When I bought this house it had a bedrrom with nothing but wallpaper glue on the walls with a bright blue color from the previous paint. I knew i would eventually gut and do the whole thing but needed to fix it ASAP. I bought a larg bucket of spackle and skim coated it . It looked great. Perhaps you can apply it over the mastic and the remaining areas . The spackle with the blue top is what i am told by a pro the type to use for that kind of job . Good luck Anthony

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              • #8
                Well i started using a heatgun today seems to be working out.slow process but i'm not going anywhere soon.
                A fishing pole is the best cordless tool!

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                • #9
                  Chic,

                  Glad to hear that the heat gun is working to ease the removal a bit. Just be careful as some of those heat guns can overly heat things and we sure don't want to fire as a result! The heat gun that I use has got three settings with one just being the blower. I find that the low heat setting works okay and have only used the hgh setting if the adhesive is really stubborn.

                  Good luck on your project,

                  CWS

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                  • #10
                    cw,last night as i was trying to sleep that ? kept entring my mind.how much heat does plaster hold and how long does it hold that heat in,and does it transfer it to the wood lats.so thanks for the input and i am going to be careful with it and take my time.
                    A fishing pole is the best cordless tool!

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