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  • A small accomplishment

    I finally got the time to work on mortise and tenon joints. Last night I was able to actually join two scrap boards together and have them line up to 90deg! I put the dado blade on the TS and the arbor seems fine, much to my relief! Got the Ridgid mortising attachment for the drill press, and after some struggle got it set up and working.

    I know it's a very small thing, but I just feel like it's a huge accomplishment to finally be able to do mortise and tenon joints!!! For me at least, it's a great step forward.

    Does anyone have any hints or tips for lining up the mortise and the tenon? I got them pretty close, but it took a lot of work. Obviously I'm doing something wrong. Of course, the wood I was working with was some scrap 2x4, and it wasn't really dimensioned carefully. How do you guys measure for your joints?
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

  • #2
    Originally posted by VASandy
    How do you guys measure for your joints?
    I usually make them the length of the paper, just kidding, that was decades ago in land far, far away. Congratulations, that is one of the great aspects of woodworking, the pride that occurs when you successfully accomplish/master a new technique. I’ve personally have very limited experience with M&T joints, the ones that I have made were following plans and I was fortunate enough that they came out great but I measured umpteen times to make sure of the placement.

    Woodslayer

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    • #3
      Best advice I can offer is to make your tenons first. Then place the tenon over the area to be mortised and mark the length. Then decide how much reveal you want and add that to 1/2 of the thickness of the tenon board. Draw that line down between the top and bottom traced lines of the tenon. Now drill you mortises on that line from edge to edge of the mortise width. Don't know if anyone can understand my explaination, but I'm trying. LOL
      info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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      • #4
        papadan,

        I understand fully, thats pretty much the way my dad taught me to do them.

        REgards,

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        • #5
          Congratulations, it is a great feeling and satisfying when a new technique works well. I myself have always had a desire to make raised panel doors and have unsuccessfuuly done so so far, I am really not set up with the proper tools to do them. One day..............

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          • #6
            Originally posted by papadan
            Best advice I can offer is to make your tenons first. Then place the tenon over the area to be mortised and mark the length. Then decide how much reveal you want and add that to 1/2 of the thickness of the tenon board. Draw that line down between the top and bottom traced lines of the tenon. Now drill you mortises on that line from edge to edge of the mortise width. Don't know if anyone can understand my explaination, but I'm trying. LOL
            What do you mean by reveal?

            "add amount of reveal to 1/2 the thickness of the tenon" means with a 1.5" thick tenon, that would be 3/4" + reveal. Draw a line 3/4" down (assuming no reveal) from the top? The traced lines then would give you the shoulder, correct? Sorry to be so dumb about this! I think I need to go find a video somewhere. Words just ain't gettin it!

            I really appreciate your help. I'll do some more work on this and maybe everything will make some sense then.
            I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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            • #7
              If you get the DIY channel on tv try watching the David Marks' woodworking show.. He's really a master woodworker and I've learned a great deal from him. Here in the high desert his show comes on every morning, at least it did for a couple of years, and I was able to tape every show and now have a reference for just about every common woodworking technique..... Maryjo

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              • #8
                a reveal is the surface that you can see (exposed) after another is fastened on top of it and set slightly back from the edge.... I think.

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                • #9
                  Let me have a shot a explaining the "reveal" as PaPaDan was referring: If you are using a M&T (mortise & tennon) joint to join a 1" thick cross-piece to a 2" thick upright, you have a 1" difference in thickness. "Reveal" would be the amount of this difference showing when you look at the face of the finished piece.
                  EX #1. You can center the crosspiece, which will mean you have 1/2" reveal on the front, 1" thick cross-piece, and 1/2" reveal on the back (equalling the 2" thickness of the upright).
                  EX #2. You can have the cross-piece flush with the front of the upright: no reveal on the front, + 1" of the cross-piece, + 1" reveal on the back = 2" thick upright.
                  To find out where to put the centerline for drilling your mortise, you have to add the amount of the reveal to 1/2 the thickness of the cross-piece. In Ex #1, you add the reveal (1/2") to 1/2 of the crosspiece thickness (1/2") to give 1". So your centerline will be 1" from the face of the upright (or also from the back in this case)
                  In Case #2, the centerline will be only 1/2" from the front, OR will be 1 1/2" from the back.
                  If the boards are of different thickness, you can use what ever reveal fits your need or artistic bent. If they are the same thickness, most often you will want both front and back flush, which means there will be no reveal.
                  Sorry if I'm too wordy. Hope this helps. I'll shut up now
                  Practicing at practical wood working

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                  • #10
                    Gofor, no need to say "I'll shut up now" , you did a fine job of explaining it and used just the right amount of words. Enough to get your point across w/o being long winded (which I am guilty of at times)
                    ---------------
                    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                    ---------------
                    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
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                    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
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                    • #11
                      Thanks for all the help!!! The explanations really do work. I appreciate the efforts, gofor!
                      I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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