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  • 240 vs 120

    I just bought a TS2650 and was wondering about the advantages about swithching the power to 240V. I was told it was cheaper to run because it uses half the amps. but I think that is wrong since the amps are drawn from 2 lines and thereby still being metered. I was also told that it is easier on the start up phase of the motor since more power is available through the 2 wire input.

    What's your views?

    Talus

  • #2
    Originally posted by Talus
    I just bought a TS2650 and was wondering about the advantages about swithching the power to 240V. I was told it was cheaper to run because it uses half the amps. but I think that is wrong since the amps are drawn from 2 lines and thereby still being metered. I was also told that it is easier on the start up phase of the motor since more power is available through the 2 wire input.

    What's your views?

    Talus
    It draws half the amps at twice the voltage so it uses the same watts and it's watts that you pay for, not amps or volts. There are some small advantages to running it at 240 if you have 240 available already. I run mine on 120 just fine.
    Lorax
    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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    • #3
      As Lorax stated it'll cost the same to run. There are some potential advantages in switching IF you're 120v wiring is not quite up to the task. There are typically some losses in any circuit. If you're line is very long, or the wire is on the thin side, or there are other devices drawing power, or the supply grid itself is on the low side, your saw may suffer from slight voltage losses caused by any of those situations. The same losses can occur on a 240 circuit too, but the wire gauge should be less of a factor, and any losses that do occur are a smaller percentage of the total, so the motor is more likely to always see closer to a theoretical full voltage. The amp draw of the 3650 is fairly low so it's less likely to be an issue.

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      • #4
        In higher horse power motors it is a big advantage,
        in lower power motors the advantage is less,

        and like said it is do the amps drawn, and many times it is the start up amperage, and some what depends on the "quality" of wiring your dealing with, most modern homes should have good wiring, of proper size and amp carrying capacity, but if dealing with some older home that were under wired by to days standard, (and 220 is available) running on 220 can be a big advantage in spreading the amp draw out over the two in coming power lines and not just one,

        the biggest thing is voltage drop, Normally, and that is when the wire in the building or to the building is not of adequate size to carry the amperage with out nearing the capacity of the wire and do to the fact that there is resistance in the wire the closer it gets to the capacity of it the more the resistance come in to play,

        example: you have a pipe, and it has 120 pounds of pressure, and you open up a valve at the end of the pipe and release a gallon a min of water, the pressure at the valve stays at 118 pounds of pressure, but if you open up the valve to 5 gallons a min, the pressure could drop more, possibly down to 100 pounds, now if you increase the pipe size it will hold the pressure, as there is not the resistance in the pipe to slow the water, but if you can not "make the pipe bigger" you can reduce the flow and use two pipes, that is some what how it would work, with 120 vs, 240 volts.

        so it is some what a balancing act with your needs and power requirements, and your own wiring quality of your building,

        if when you click the saw on and the lights dim, then 220 would be a good idea to look into,

        the other reason not to switch is it going to be used in a semi portable use, and the normal power available is 120, as to have 220 easily on a job site some times can be hard to come by, but in a shop location 220 is a good choice, for motors that are over 1 hp - 1 1/2 hp (via watt rating) in size, above that I would suggest that 220 is recommended.

        when a motor starts most of the time it can easily draw twice or more it name plate rating,
        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
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        • #5
          I have no electrical background, and have my TS3650 at 120v. But there is a major advantage to 220 that I don't think was mentioned. Since the amps are 1/2, you can run two machines safely on the same circuit at the same time. In particular, I am referring to a dust collector, also wired to 220.

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          • #6
            The "advantage" of going to 240 volts is that it cuts the amperage in half. On a circuit where the wiring it only 14 guage (the minumum for a 15 amp line), your saw will be greatly hampered at 120 volts. On a 20 amp/120 volt line with 12 guage wire, you may not realize an advantage unless you've got more than your table saw on the same circuit.

            Basically, if you're pulling close to 15 amps on 14 guage line, you are potentially overloading it (heated wires and strain on the motor). On a 20 gauge line, you're okay unless trying to run a couple of tools (add up the amp rating of the motors). In either case, when you go to 240 volts, the amperage is cut in half, providing better margin on the wire's current-handling ability.

            CWS

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            • #7
              Also less heat
              Not responsible for speeling mistakes
              Jeff

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