Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Must Be Doing Something Wrong-TS3650? Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Must Be Doing Something Wrong-TS3650?

    When I set up my saw, I used a carpenters square, combination square, and an old engineering triangle for the blade angle and fence alignment. Everything looked good by eye per the directions in the manual. None of those instruments measure in the .ooo's. Can anyone clue me in on what tools to use to get these accuracies? Oh yeah, cost would be another concern. Thanks

  • #2
    Hi Hector:
    You would use a dial indicator with a magnetic base .they usually run around $30 - $60
    Do a search on dial indicators in the general woodworking section for more tips

    Good luck
    Nelz

    Comment


    • #3
      Harbor Freight has a very accurate, for woodworking purposes, dial indicator and also a magnetic base. The dial indicator is this one, http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...Itemnumber=623 These go on sale pretty regularily for around $7. The magnetic base is, http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...temnumber=5645 It also goes on sale often for around $8.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

      Comment


      • #4
        Checking blade square

        Hey guys: I saw this in a Fine Woodworking mag and have not yet tried it, but I will.

        1. Raise the blade to max height.
        2. Use two peices of stock that are just less in width than the blade is high, stand them on EDGE and cut a thin peice off one end of them (use the mitre gauge or a cross cut sled) att he same time. Recommended length is 16 - 20 inches. Thickness - 3/4 to 2 inches would be okay. A piece of MDF or hard woos will do nicely.
        3. Bookend the two cut surfaces. Any "out of squareness" will show up as a thin wedge of light.
        4. Adjust and repeat as required until the two ends meet perfectly.

        To check the mitre gauge for square:

        1. Check the blade for vertical squareness first.
        2. Use the same pieces of stock, laying one atop the other.
        3. Trim one end of the stock, using the mitre gauge to hold the stock.
        4. Again, bookend the stock. If there is a thin gap, adjust the mitre gauge and repeat until the two ends meet.

        There is another one for checking the trueness of the blade and mitre slots.

        1. Get a (square) piece of material that is 14 to 20 inches along each side.
        2. Number the edges 1, 2, 3, 4 clockwisw.
        3. Cut a 1/2 to 1 inch wide strip off side 1.
        4. Now cut side 2, with side 1 against the cross cut sled fence closest to you. You will make 3 more cuts (four in total) sequentially, rotating the material counter-clockwise as you go.
        5. Now cut another strip off side 1 about 1/2 to 3/4 inch wide.
        6. Label the ends A and B. Break the strip in half.
        7. Compare the thicknesses of A and B. If they are the same , all is good. If not, you may need to adjust the trueness of the blade and repeat until A and B are the same thickness.

        I hope this makes sense, if not, I will try to clarify as required.
        "Dad, E means empty, NOT broken" - my cousin Doug, to his dad after the tractor ran out of diesel and Ed claimed the gas gauge was broken.

        Comment


        • #5
          I bought the Incra 5” combo that includes a square and 45 and have been very pleased with them.
          http://www.woodpeck.com/incrasquares.html
          I have the capability to verify their accuracy and can attest that they easily exceeded their advertised accuracy. I have read in many tune-up articles that modern inexpensive plastic draftsman triangles are very accurate but have not verified that in any way. If you can get the setup Dave suggested for $15 that would be great to have around for tune-ups. I wouldn’t be concerned about accuracy (at that price you won’t get it), the main concern would be repeatability and if the instrument has enough resolution that you can discern a movement of .001” and that could be crudely verified with a feeler gage. As long as it is repeatable and you adjust your saw for minimal variations you should be fine.

          Good luck

          Woodslayer

          Comment


          • #6
            Leer13

            I’ve have read and tried a variation of the method listed as “trueness of the blade and miter slots” you posted but it was checking for perpendicularity of the blade to the miter gage. The procedure is the same stopping at step 4, and then you check the squareness of the corner formed by sides 1 and 4, any detected error will be 4 times the actual error. So in essence if you stopped at step four and performed the above and then proceeded to complete the rest of the steps you stated you could verify two alignments at once.

            Woodslayer

            Comment


            • #7
              Wow, thank you all very much. Looks like I've got some homework to do.

              Comment


              • #8
                May I suggest "The Table Saw Book" by Kelly Mehler, probably available at your local library.

                I also like www.hamiltonbooks.com for woodworking books at great prices.
                Lorax
                "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                Comment


                • #9
                  Lorax-
                  Thanks for the suggestion. I went to the library, but they didn't have the book you mentioned in my branch. I'll get it. While I was there I saw( no pun intended) two others. Any opinions?
                  Table Saw Tips and Tricks, Kenneth Burton
                  Table Saw, Workshop Bench Reference, Roger W. Cliff

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi I have The Table saw book by Roger Cliff its an older book but excellent.There are many good ts books out there but as you said do your homework good luck! Anthony

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks Anthony.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by woodslayer
                        I bought the Incra 5” combo that includes a square and 45 and have been very pleased with them.
                        http://www.woodpeck.com/incrasquares.html
                        I have the capability to verify their accuracy and can attest that they easily exceeded their advertised accuracy. I have read in many tune-up articles that modern inexpensive plastic draftsman triangles are very accurate but have not verified that in any way. If you can get the setup Dave suggested for $15 that would be great to have around for tune-ups. I wouldn’t be concerned about accuracy (at that price you won’t get it), the main concern would be repeatability and if the instrument has enough resolution that you can discern a movement of .001” and that could be crudely verified with a feeler gage. As long as it is repeatable and you adjust your saw for minimal variations you should be fine.

                        Good luck

                        Woodslayer
                        um.... sucker.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          And am I’m supposed to be insulted by Mr. Um, I’m hiding behind someone else’s name because I’m to ashamed to use my own? Lets hope you have more to contribute with your second post.

                          Woodslayer

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by woodslayer
                            And am I’m supposed to be insulted by Mr. Um, I’m hiding behind someone else’s name because I’m to ashamed to use my own? Lets hope you have more to contribute with your second post.

                            Woodslayer
                            Sorry. Didn't mean to offend you. (Is "Woodslayer" your given name?)

                            Just thought it was a bit pricey for a square. I looked at the product page, thought they were pretty neat. I just couldn't justify that cost when a square, square can be had for a quarter of the cost.

                            Do you see any advantages of that square over other square, squares?

                            -george

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              George

                              No offence taken, I just thought since that was your first post that perhaps you might be one of those people who show up here from time to time and stay about a week with the sole purpose of agitating as many members as possible. I agree, the squares were pricey and I could have spent less but they do aid in accurately setting up my tools which eliminates one more thing for me to blame when I hack up a project, hence the name.

                              Woodslayer

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X