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  • New TS3650 questions

    I finally got my new TS3650 put together. All in all, I think it took me about 10-15 hours. I've never owned a TS before, and the 2 things that took me the longest were 1) deciphering the manual and 2) trying to align all the different components.

    I think that I've finally got aligned correctly. At least as good as I can get it anyway. I've made a few cuts with it and so far everything appears to working great.

    I do have a few questions though.
    1) There are some brown discolored spots on the table top. What are
    they and should I be worried.
    2) My "workshop" is a very crowded 10X12 shed wich is unconditioned.
    Will the saw be ok in the heat/cold/humidity?
    3) Is there a list somewhere of the tolerances for alignment?

    Like I said I think that it's aligned correctly, but on some of the alignments, such as checking 90 degrees and 45 degrees I noticed that either my brand new square does not have perfectly straight edges or the saw blade is not perfectly straight. (and yes I made sure that the square was not resting on any of the saw tooth blades).

    I'm sure I'll have more questions, but these are the only ones I can think of right now.

    Thanks,

    Darik

  • #2
    If your square and the blade do not line up, then it doesn't sound like the saw is aligned.

    A shed that is unconditioned (?) (no heat, no air conditioning?) Does not sound ideal. If things tend to rust out there, then the same can certainly happen to the saw.

    The brown spots - does not sound major. If it is rust, it can be compounded out.

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    • #3
      Dragon: My saw (about a year old) is in a similar type of shop. I put a good coat of wax on it to start and have had no problems. My previous saw (that I had for 40 years) didn't develop any problems from its surroundings, either. It just got tired after so many years of service.

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      • #4
        What kind of wax is best for the table top? I also have a saw (about two weeks old) and a family member to remain anonymous set a container with a wet bottom on the table, which, when I discovered and moved it a couple days later, had already formed a ring of rust. I plan to use emery paper to remove the existing rust, and then wax. So, what brand/type of wax, and is the emery paper the way to remove the rust?

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        • #5
          Selph, I had a similar situation with my saw. I found that some WD-40 and some super fine sand paper worked well for me. I then cleaned it up real well and went over the whole cast iron surface with Johnsons Paste Wax (as was recommended by others on this forum). Since then I have not had any problems. Johnsons is available at my local Home Depot. Others have used different brands of wax, but the general conensus is to use a paste type wax so that you will not cause any issues with the wood that is passed over it and the finishing process.

          WWS
          Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

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          • #6
            You want to use a "paste" wax, as they do not contain silicone. You can't use a silicone wax, as that will cause the wood to produce fish-eye like spots when you go to finish it.

            If the blade isn't lining up with the brand new square, I'd say there's a problem with the blade! I believe the manual says to run the blade till it's square to the table, then adjust the pointer to that. If the blade itself is warped, I'd see if that could be returned to HD to swap with a straight one.
            I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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            • #7
              I put a coat of Johnson's paste wax on the saw the day after I finished putting it together. It seems fairly easy to apply. How many coats should I apply?

              When I said that the blade wasn't lining up with the saw blade, I meant that the bottom and the top of the square were touching the blade but in the middle there was a slight gap. Enough to see a sliver of daylight anyway.

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              • #8
                Take the blade off and put it down on the table (first one side, then the other) and check to make sure the blade isn't warped.
                I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dragon
                  I put a coat of Johnson's paste wax on the saw the day after I finished putting it together. It seems fairly easy to apply. How many coats should I apply?

                  When I said that the blade wasn't lining up with the saw blade, I meant that the bottom and the top of the square were touching the blade but in the middle there was a slight gap. Enough to see a sliver of daylight anyway.
                  It's best to use three the first time. You want to be sure that that there aren't any missed spots to allow rust to start. I only did one coat the first time and one damp day I went to the shop and the saw had a faint red tint to it. Dragged my finger and "Yikes".

                  As for the blade, I'd say that you have it right and the center section of the blade is 'relieved' for less drag. I have a couple like that too.
                  Later,
                  Chiz
                  Later,
                  Chiz
                  https://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/frown.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...es/redface.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...s/rolleyes.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/smile.png

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