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  • thinking about starting a shop

    could i pipe a dust collection system with PVC under the concrete to save on hanging hoses? if its a good idea what size would i have to use, what HP vacume, and what would i use for couplers to go to the tools?

    i was thinking 2" PVC and instead of making a 90* corner use 2 45* street fittings or a sweep 90, to lessen the chance of a clog.

    the problem i see with this is the fact that if i want to rearange to make room for a new tool or storage area or anything like that, i cant. but i was thinking that i can pour a 2" floor ontop of compacted road gravel so i could use my shop for a while before i pour the 4" floor, to see where i want my tools.

    nick

  • #2
    My opinion, I would not gamble that much on the future. If you want to bring up a 4" pvc pipe through the slab in a corner or next to the wall, that might be a player, because you could manifold off it around the walls or overhead if necessary to any tool and change it easily. (Note: if you are using rigid PVC, don't glue it until you know everything is final. It will work fine without glue of the ends of the pvc are square) But then it would be easier to do that through the wall as well if your DC is going to be outside. My previous house had a PVC dryer vent run under the slab. Let me tell you, when it gets clogged or critters decide to take up residence in it, it can be a major pain to clean out!!
    my $.02
    Practicing at practical wood working

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    • #3
      I think Gofur is right, if and when things go wrong, and they will, you're in for a big chore getting it fixed. Besides, even if you do run the lines under the slab, you're going to have to get them to the machines and what happens when you decide to re-arrange? What happens when you add a new tool?

      I think it's just as easy and more flexible to run your lines where you can get at them later. What are you going to do if there's an earthquake and your slab shifts and the PVC cracks? Dig it up again?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Cephus
        What are you going to do if there's an earthquake and your slab shifts and the PVC cracks? Dig it up again?
        So, how's the weather out there in California??
        Last edited by Lorax; 05-01-2006, 06:27 PM.
        Lorax
        "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Lorax
          So, how's the weather out there in California??
          Just fine, thanks, but there are plenty of other places that get earthquakes or other ground disturbances. The ground freezing over and over again can cause cement to crack as well.

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          • #6
            So you really are from California?
            Too funny! ROTFLMAO.
            Those of us who live where the groung freezes and thaws a lot know how to mix and pour concrete so it doesn't crack.
            Just pickin' on ya.
            BTW, I agree with everything you said in your first post.
            Lorax
            "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Lorax
              Those of us who live where the groung freezes and thaws a lot know how to mix and pour concrete so it doesn't crack.
              I still haven't mastered the proper technique Lorax....maybe I can persuade you to help pour my next concrete project?

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              • #8
                No problemo.
                Just call me at BR549.
                Lorax
                "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                • #9
                  im going to pour a heated slab 6" thick, so i can drive the bobcat and tractor on it without a problem, i pour concrete for a living, so rerod, mesh and concrete are not a huge financial issue for the project, i live in Upper Michigan so i dont have earthquakes but we do have a heck of a freeze thaw cycle. i am going to pour 4' x 8" ICF walls around ontop the slab to ensure no shearing of the slab. BUT i do feel that the rearange issue is going to be the downfall of the whole idea. i diddnt want to run the lines in the external walls due to R value loss, but i can have hoses hanging from the rafters, and have it all redirected to a scrap room.

                  i was going to run all the wiring and pneumatic lines to the tools under the slab, to eliminate anything hanging from the celing, but i think the fact that i cant rearrange is stoping it from hapening

                  none of this is set in stone yet, but this is the current version of the planning.

                  im going to take you guys advice and just leave nothing in the floor.thanks for all the input, i would have been really bummed a year from now when i buy a new tool with no where to put it.

                  thanks again,
                  Nick

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                  • #10
                    Using 2x4s or 2x6s and plywood you could build a sub floor and run your various lines under that. The plywood is easier on the feet than concrete and easier to open up if you have a problem. Would defeat the heating in the slab though.

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                    • #11
                      Another possibility would be to run a couple of utility trenches in the floor away from where you'll park the bobcat, etc, with either 2by wood covers or metal covers. If its somewhat along the line of where you would line up the power tools (ie 1 foot in from the back wall with a "T" going through the middle of the power tool work area as an example) , that would allow you to change dust/vacuum and power hookups as needed. It would probably mean dropping the bottom of the utility corridor lower than the 6" slab you are now intending, and would be some extra rebar config, but it would minimize any ducting running across the floor. Sounds like a big project, regardless and it appears you are doing some good preplanning.

                      Good luck
                      Practicing at practical wood working

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        those both sound like great ideas, i like the wood floor one especially. what i would do is make a wood floor in the shop area, and concrete in the "recieving area," if you will. you see, the more i got to thinking about it the more i realized i dont need a 6" thich floor through the whole shop, just where i am going to drive in to bring in and take out wood. i need a big long drain and radiant heat to thaw lumber, logs, and anything else that might need thawing. in the wood floor i could have radiant heat as well, just stapled to the floor. i think i would use 2x4s as my joists and lift them 3 1/2" off the floor, so i could use 2x4 chunks on edge as "mini beams" every 4' or so, and if i ran them 12" OC i could get away with 5/8" CDX as flooring. with the 3 1/2" lift of the floor joists i could run any lines without cutting any joists, and the 4x8 CDX would peel up nice as long as i used screws spairingly, for easy access.

                        great ideas, thanks,
                        nick

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                        • #13
                          Would like to see some pictures as you go. Good luck

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