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TP1300 planer kickback problem

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  • #16
    planning your planing

    I've always found that a little extra planning can eliminate a lot of extra planing.
    Lorax
    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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    • #17
      I've never had it throw wood back, but I've had it eat it up and spit some out.
      www.TheWoodCellar.com

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      • #18
        Glappe, great links. I learned a bunch about cutting boards. Timely info too cause LOML wants a good set of kitchen knives and I know that our current glass board kills knife edges

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        • #19
          Originally posted by wbrooks
          Glappe, great links. I learned a bunch about cutting boards. Timely info too cause LOML wants a good set of kitchen knives and I know that our current glass board kills knife edges
          Take a look at this knife set at leevalley. I was given this set as a wedding gift from my sister-in-law and I love them. My wife is Canadian, that's how I learned about Leevalley. As an interesting side note....My wife's maiden name was brooks, and she's from Ontario. Small world huh?

          http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page...=2,40733,40738
          "Artificial Intelligence can never replace Human Stupidity"

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          • #20
            I run my good knives across a steel nearly every time I use them, cuts down on how often they will need sharpening. I use maple cutting boards. Unless you are running a pro kitchen, good knives with a maple cutting board can go a long time between sharpenings.
            www.TheWoodCellar.com

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            • #21
              Sure is a small world. I am a big fan of LV and I have been looking at this set http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page...33,40738,45507

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              • #22
                Originally posted by wbrooks
                Sure is a small world. I am a big fan of LV and I have been looking at this set http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page...33,40738,45507
                Those are really nice knives.

                Well I fixed the kickback problem. It was me, I adjusted the infeed table up just a little to compensate for the heavy board. I also adjusted the height of the rollers by eye so that it just grabs the board, then I slowly lower the blades until the board runs through. I make a pass then lower just a little so I only take off no more than a 16th. This has solved the kickback problem so I'm back in bussiness. I also made a stop on the miter saw's fence so I just put the boards against the back of the fence and slide it to the stop and cut. This gives me the same 2" cut every time. Much better.

                Just to show you what I've been talking about here are pics of the two end-grain cutting boards that I finished tonite. They do have rubber feet, you just can't see them.

                Thanks for all the help guys!
                Attached Files
                Last edited by GLappe; 05-11-2006, 09:22 AM.
                "Artificial Intelligence can never replace Human Stupidity"

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                • #23
                  Nice work,

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                  • #24
                    Yes, nice work. This is sort of on topic. How are these glued up? Did you glue the blocks into strips, then glue the strips together, or are all the blocks glued in one go?

                    Thanks,
                    Frank

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                    • #25
                      They look real nice glappe,what about a little bead on the edge to catch all them steak juices you'll be choppin!

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by FSK
                        Yes, nice work. This is sort of on topic. How are these glued up? Did you glue the blocks into strips, then glue the strips together, or are all the blocks glued in one go?

                        Thanks,
                        Frank
                        Here you go, this is what I do.

                        Plane the beams/boards to make sure that all the sides are flat and smooth.
                        Cut the beams/boards into the 2" pieces, and assemble the pieces to form a nice pattern. Remeber to alternate the grain of the blocks to control warping.
                        Glue and clamp the blocks vertical surface to form horizontal strips. Let the glue dry.
                        Plane the sides (not the end grain) of the strips to create a flat surface for gluing the strips together. Dry fit and clamp the strips to check the joining surfaces for a flush fit.
                        Glue and clamp the strips together to form the board. Let the glue dry. Pay attention to the pattern.
                        Plane the top and bottom of the board alternating the top and bottom while planing. Plane slowly and a little at a time or you might damage the board. Also only plane in one direction since the planer will feather the end-grain and it will need to be cut off (I use a band saw) and sanded smooth with a belt sander.
                        After planing check for gaps between the blocks and fill with glue and let it dry for a few hours.
                        Use a router with a round over bit on all corners.
                        Sand with 150 grit paper using a DA sander.
                        Sand with 240 grit paper using a DA sander.
                        Mount the feet and apply several coats of the sealing paste. The paste is made by melting 5 parts mineral oil with one part beeswax. When it cools it becomes a paste.

                        That’s it.
                        Last edited by GLappe; 05-11-2006, 12:25 PM.
                        "Artificial Intelligence can never replace Human Stupidity"

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                        • #27
                          Cutting end grain with a thickness planer is a misapplication. If you intend to make a quantity of these cutting boards, you might want to look for a used stroke sander. It is also possible to build a small stroke sander depending on your ability to "forage" materials such as angle iron, roller bearings, motors, belts, etc. You might find instructions on the net or in woodworking magazines. I would not recommend using a thickness planer for your application. I own the same planer you are using.

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