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TP1300 planer kickback problem

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  • TP1300 planer kickback problem

    I have not one issue from this planer until I started making end grain cutting boards. The boards are made of oak and red oak blocks that are 2" cubes or close to this measurement. They are glued together using tight bond II so that the end-grain will be the cutting surface. I try to get the blocks as even as possible but they do vary in height to no more than 1/8th". As the blade touches the board it bites hard removing a good chunk and slings the board a good 4 feet. My guess is that the roller doesn’t have enough contact with the board to hold it against the back pressure from the blade. Maybe the board is wobbling/tilting into the blade and causing this? I have discovered that if I take the belt sander and smooth one side of the board (this takes forever) it will plane with no problem. Any suggestions?
    "Artificial Intelligence can never replace Human Stupidity"

  • #2
    Sounds like you have answered your own question. I would do as you are by using a belt sander first.
    SSG, U.S. Army
    Retired
    K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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    • #3
      Is it possible you are trying to take out too much in one pass? What if you try adjusting the planer to take off less material and run it through a few more times?

      WWS
      Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by wwsmith
        Is it possible you are trying to take out too much in one pass? What if you try adjusting the planer to take off less material and run it through a few more times?

        WWS

        Actually I was trying to do just that and take little off at a time. Maybe I need to try to take more off so that the rollers have sufficient down force on the board to keep it from kicking. It is weird that the chunk it removed was three times the cut depth that I had selected. It looks like when the blade hit the board it pulled it upwards into itself causing it to dig too deep too fast and kicked it. The blades are sharp so...Dunno. I just hate having to use a belt sander for 30 min when my planer can do it in two secs.
        "Artificial Intelligence can never replace Human Stupidity"

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        • #5
          I think the belt sander is your only choice. A thicknes planer is not made to smooth a surface is there are square blocks sticking up 1/8" above the surface. You need to get it close to flat before running it through it. I woulnd recommend belt sanding both side to get it close first.
          SSG, U.S. Army
          Retired
          K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by TOD
            I think the belt sander is your only choice. A thicknes planer is not made to smooth a surface is there are square blocks sticking up 1/8" above the surface. You need to get it close to flat before running it through it. I woulnd recommend belt sanding both side to get it close first.
            Thank you for all the info. I knew that was going to be the answer. I think that I may stop tonight and get a new belt sander. Any sujestions? I currently have the Black&Decker 3x18 but the Dragster is looking sweet.
            "Artificial Intelligence can never replace Human Stupidity"

            Comment


            • #7
              my bet is that you are getting snipe. I bet that 2" board is some heavy. I think as you feed the board in and it gets to the first roller it is pressing on an uneven surface and actually lifting the leading edge into the knives. It only take a few thou lift to start down the path to kickback with the size of board you have. Before you give up on the planer you may want to try putting the block on a carrier board and shimming so it is stable then run the entire assembly through the planer. I think this is your only other option as you are not starting off with a flat reference side

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              • #8
                First thing to do is on all of the rest of the boards you make you need to use a fence and cut the blocks to the same length and assemble them on a hard surface so if there is a little difference in hieght it will only be on one side and easier to knock down with a belt sander.
                info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by papadan
                  First thing to do is on all of the rest of the boards you make you need to use a fence and cut the blocks to the same length and assemble them on a hard surface so if there is a little difference in hieght it will only be on one side and easier to knock down with a belt sander.
                  I was thinking that but didn't want to say it.
                  SSG, U.S. Army
                  Retired
                  K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    if all else fails here you may want to try using a router planing jig

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                    • #11
                      I've never put endgrain through a planer. I always hand plane endgrain.
                      You should try handplaning endgrain and you will understand the challenge of putting it through a power planer. I cannot see how the blades are sharp enough to deal with endgrain.
                      www.TheWoodCellar.com

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                      • #12
                        Good point on the hand plane, I was just reading a thread on LV VS LN BU planes and got thinking about this thread.
                        Is it a good idea to build a cutting board from oak end grain in the first place? I think it would tend to split easily in use, the first wack with a cleaver might split it? Also how do you seal the oak end grain from absorbing the meat juice?

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                        • #13
                          Oak endgrain is about as porous as it gets. Sealing it would require filler, epoxy, or some type of extra hard poly if the endgrain is going to be used as a cutting surface. I still dont see how it could successfully be put thru a power planer.
                          www.TheWoodCellar.com

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by wbrooks
                            Good point on the hand plane, I was just reading a thread on LV VS LN BU planes and got thinking about this thread.
                            Is it a good idea to build a cutting board from oak end grain in the first place? I think it would tend to split easily in use, the first wack with a cleaver might split it? Also how do you seal the oak end grain from absorbing the meat juice?
                            I agree that oak is pourus but it is used quite a bit in the construction of all types of cutting boards including end-grain. About soaking up meat juices, as with all wooden cutting boards you must season and sanitize it on a regular basis especially after cutting meats. I use a mixture of 5 parts mineral oil to 1 part beeswax for sealing purposes melted together to make a paste.
                            I prefer the end-grain cutting boards because they are very durable, beautiful, very kind to your knives cutting edge, and doesn’t show cut marks. It’s good to be safe about germs but we have such a phobia about them these days that we are creating some of the deadliest and resistant strains ever with all of these germicides. I can remember when everyone only used one wooden cutting board for everything and I don’t remember anyone getting sick.

                            Here is a quote form the site that is the last link at the bottom.
                            "Research has shown that bacteria, such as the salmonella often found on raw chicken, will thrive and multiply if not removed from plastic boards (because germs that cause food poisoning can hide out in the knife-scarred nooks and crannies that develop on the surface of a plastic cutting board). Hand scrubbing with hot water and soap can clear microbes from the surface of new or used wooden cutting boards and new plastic ones, but knife-scared plastic boards are resistant to decontamination by hand washing.
                            On wood boards, whether they are new or have been used for years, the bacteria dies off within 3 minutes. Researchers theorize that the porous surface of the wood surface of the wooden boards deprives the bacteria of water, causing them to die."

                            The planer handles the end grain just fine as long as it is fairly flat to begin with. It does slow down a little but it will do that with any oak that is 12” wide. I did a test on a board that it would not accept. I sanded it as flat as I could get it and then fed it into the planer. It planed it with not one issue on both top and bottom.

                            Keep the info/opinions coming as they are always welcomed!


                            Here are a few links that show for care, use, and that oak is used for cutting boards quite often.

                            http://www.mapleblock.com/detail/care--maintenance-42/

                            http://www.alladd.com/redoak.htm

                            http://www.whatscookingamerica.net/C...s/AllAbout.htm
                            Last edited by GLappe; 05-08-2006, 12:55 PM.
                            "Artificial Intelligence can never replace Human Stupidity"

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                            • #15
                              I’m still confused about this evil planner, I never heard of one zinging the wood back at you. The only thing I can think of is to attach some scrap slightly thicker than the cutting board is to the sides that extends about 6” past both ends; this would prevent the rocking motion thus preventing the slinging if that is indeed the root of this mystery. Then just simply rip the scrap off the sides after the cutting board is planned. Keep us posted on what you find is the culprit.

                              Woodslayer

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