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  • To mill or not to mill

    Anyone with some first hand experience with having a sawyer come out and mill some logs?

    My wife wants about 6 med-large maples removed from the property behind the house. The tree removal guy came out to the house today and said he'd drop the trees for me and delimb them. He seems to think that it might not be worth my while though, saying I might only get a few 6-8 ft logs out of each tree.

    I am greener than this wood when it comes to this, I was just thinking about the possibilities since SWMBO wants the trees gone. I have a sawyer that will come out and mill for 0.19 bf but requires a min of 2000 bf. I thought my 6 maples would be plenty to get to the 2000 limit, but now I'm not so sure. I mean to me these are big trees, but what the heck do I know.

    Anyone have any feedback??? I'd say the trees are about 80 ft tall and have a diameter of approx 20"

  • #2
    Will the sawyer give you an estimate of the bf and if it is worth the effort or not?

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    • #3
      I am not sure about that, I will ask him.

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      • #4
        you should be able to get the 2000bf out of those trees, unless they're hollow in the middle. It's nearly impossible to tell if a tree like that has a hollow core until you start cutting into it though. It's quite possible for a healthy-looking maple to be heart-rotting. Although you're probably fine, there's a lot of things you can't tell till they're on the ground.
        I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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        • #5
          VT: Just cut up 5 pine logs (8ft) about 24 inch diameter and got about 1800 bf. Used a sawyer with a portable band saw rig--very little waste and really smooth and even cuts.

          Jim

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          • #6
            Here is a different way to look at it. SWMBO wants the trees down so down they must come. Have a look at the cores and see what they look like. If they are rotten you still have some nice firewood and likely some salvageable good wood. The sawyer does not care if you have less than 2000 bf to cut, all he want is a minimum payday of $380 to haul his stuff to your site. With 6 trees that size you should have no problem getting 2000 bf of good wood and a bunch of fire wood as a bonus

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            • #7
              i often have small lots cut. if you can roll the logs up onto a trailer you are better off bringing them to the mill, if the owner will let you. that way all the byproducts (slabs and saw dust) aren't your problem.

              when you bring them home be sure to stack it neet with stickers (3/4 x 3/4 spacers) between layers. you can but the boards up tight in each layer, shrinkage will create an air gap in no time.

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              • #8
                Also put some cheap paint on the end grains. It will reduce the amount of splitting from the ends as the lumber dries out.
                Practicing at practical wood working

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by wbrooks
                  Here is a different way to look at it. SWMBO wants the trees down so down they must come. Have a look at the cores and see what they look like. If they are rotten you still have some nice firewood and likely some salvageable good wood. The sawyer does not care if you have less than 2000 bf to cut, all he want is a minimum payday of $380 to haul his stuff to your site. With 6 trees that size you should have no problem getting 2000 bf of good wood and a bunch of fire wood as a bonus
                  This is sound advice. Sounds good to me, thanks!

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                  • #10
                    cheap paint serves another purpose too, by painting the end of the logs in a color code you will later be able to tell how much of what spiecies you have in a mixed stack of lumber

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                    • #11
                      BTW quarter sawn is not just for white oak. It produces more stable wood with less warping on any species than flat sawn. Its takes a bit longer to do it right but the results are worth it

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                      • #12
                        "Also put some cheap paint on the end grains."
                        Do this before you saw the logs and it will be easier.

                        Timber and Lumber Calculators at WOODWEB
                        http://www.woodweb.com/Resources/RSCalculators.html
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