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  • Jointing with a Router

    Several times I've seen references to using a router to joint boards. I've tried it a few times and have gotten fair results, BUT the setup and adjustments to the setup have been frustrating and make the job somewhat lacking in enjoyment.

    Because of shop space limitations (a small alcove in the garage for tool storage and workbench, plus moving a car out during actual work) a stand alone (or even bench top) jointer is not in the game plan.

    So, my question is what type of set up (jigs & fixtures) are people using to readily joint with a router. I've used an aluminum extrusion saw guide, clamped to the work piece when I've done it, but the clamps need to be moved during the work to provide clearance for the router. I've used a pattern following straight bit for the routing.

    I'm not adverse to buying some tooling to help the process. Oh, my usual work does not involve jointing long pieces, generally less than 4 ft., but often narrow, less than 4 inches.

    Thanks for any comments and suggestions.

    ****
    Dick

  • #2
    Originally posted by **** L
    Several times I've seen references to using a router to joint boards. I've tried it a few times and have gotten fair results, BUT the setup and adjustments to the setup have been frustrating and make the job somewhat lacking in enjoyment.

    Because of shop space limitations (a small alcove in the garage for tool storage and workbench, plus moving a car out during actual work) a stand alone (or even bench top) jointer is not in the game plan.

    So, my question is what type of set up (jigs & fixtures) are people using to readily joint with a router. I've used an aluminum extrusion saw guide, clamped to the work piece when I've done it, but the clamps need to be moved during the work to provide clearance for the router. I've used a pattern following straight bit for the routing.

    I'm not adverse to buying some tooling to help the process. Oh, my usual work does not involve jointing long pieces, generally less than 4 ft., but often narrow, less than 4 inches.

    Thanks for any comments and suggestions.

    ****
    I started typing on how I did it before I purchased a jointer, but then got lazy. Here is a good explaination and is pretty much how I did it:

    http://www.woodshopdemos.com/rtrplnr.htm

    Comment


    • #3
      DickL, router jointing is the easiest and fastest way of edge jointing wood. Use a flush trim bit with the bearing on the end of it. For a straight edge I use a strip of 3/4" MDF factory edge. Very straight. My pieces are 8" wide. I lay the straight edge on the board I want to joint and move it out to as close as possible to the edge of the board, making sure the full edge of the board sticks out away from the MDF. I put a clamp on each end at the back edge of the MDF away from the board edge. With the straight edge being 8" wide the clamps will not interfere with your router. Turn both pieces over and run the router down the edge of the board with the straight edge under the board. As the router bit cuts away the edge of the board the bearing will ride on the edge of the MDF and leave you with a straight jointed edge.
      info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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      • #4
        ****

        You didn’t mention if you have a router table, I have had good results using this style of clamp clamped to the board and used as the guide for a flush trim bit mounted in the router table.

        http://mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_...s/boomclm.html

        Woodslayer

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        • #5
          Thanks for the help

          All of these responses are helpful. I suspect a combination (all?) of these approachs may be the answer to my needs.

          I do have a router table, of sorts. I've mounted a router into the open space on my TS2400. What I have not done, yet, is make a real fence for routing. That shouldn't be hard as the TS's fence can serve as the basic support for an attached routing fence. The length would be limited to something between 24 in. and a max of about 36 in.

          Thanks. By the way the ****'s seem to pop up when I write my name, a controlled word? I'm not trying to be secretive.
          Dick

          Comment


          • #6
            I had to edit my post and add your L without a space to show your name. LOL
            info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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