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Zero Clearance Inserts - TS3650

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  • Zero Clearance Inserts - TS3650

    Came up with a pretty simple way to make these. I cut two blanks from 1/4" hardboard. On one of them, I left the tab that holds the front of the insert, the other I trimmed to the rounded shape like the opposite end. Then I glued them together using contact cement, used double-stick tape to attach them to the stock insert, and used a flush-trim router bit for the final shape. Then, used a #12 screw countersink to drill the hole for the hold-down screw. It worked out nice since being able to use the tab in the front (you can make this much wider than the stock insert) plus the screw in the back holds it down well. Happily, I didn't have to do a lick of sanding, it was perfectly flush with the top of the saw the first time I dropped it in. Took about 45 minutes, and cost about 80 cents in materials.

  • #2
    Sounds like a good plan, Steven! I made one with 1/2" MDF and one with 1/2" ply for mine. I like the idea of using 2 pieces of 1/4" though. Makes it easier to do that tab! Thanks for sharing the process.
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

    Comment


    • #3
      Zci

      What tab? Any chance of posting a photo or two of what you did?
      there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Uhmw Zci?

        On the recommendation of somebody on this forum, I bought two UHMW blank inserts for my TS3650. Both are bowed up in the middle about 1/16" so they're impossible to set flat to the table-top. Best I can do is to set them so that the middle is flush and the ends are down below the table. How tacky is that?!

        Guess I'll make some out of MDF. I did that with my old saw and they worked great for many years. Should have done that in the first place.
        Unanswered Questions
        are far less dangerous
        than Unquestioned Answers.

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        • #5
          Why didn't you return them for different ones if they weren't flat?

          This question of where to get ZCI's comes up quite frequently so if you had a bad experience it might be benificial for the other members to know where you bought those.
          ================================================== ====
          ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

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          • #6
            Re: Zero Clearance Inserts - TS3650

            I went to the BORG store and picked up a couple 6"x24"x1/2" pieces of
            oak , they call it a craft board. its in the same aisle as the rest of the
            oak,only down under the rack.

            took the stock plate flipped it over traced the out line and cut away
            the eccess. then stuck the two together with double sided tape
            went over to my router table and with a triming bit w/a top bearing
            I made a duplicate of the stock plate.

            next I changed bits to trim the bottom side to fit where the leveling
            screws go(didnt use those tho) just trimed it to the exact fit.
            (make sure it sits below the table top by a hair)
            dropped it in and raised the blade to cut the slot.

            I then stained it a golden oak topped off with minwax paste wax.

            Now, Ive got a really nice zero clearence throat plate.
            havent gotten around to makeing one for my dado set yet.

            the cost about 6 dollars each vs 25 at your "better" online catalog places
            like Rockler. and ive seen some of there phenolic plates,,some are bowed
            some not. drilling or cutting that stuf aint easy.
            Im lucky Ive got a rockler store 6 miles from my house.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Zero Clearance Inserts - TS3650

              I used Corian counter top scraps for my inserts. The thickness was a perfect fit.

              They are also slicker than wood or MDF.

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              • #8
                Re: Zero Clearance Inserts - TS3650

                My inserts are made from 3/4" melamine coated particle board (aka shelves), routed a bit on each end to fit.

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                • #9
                  Re: Zero Clearance Inserts - TS3650

                  kilroy...how do you handle the thickness of the melamine? 3/4" is much thicker than the blade opening will permit, so what methid do you use to reduce the thickness. thanks.
                  there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Zero Clearance Inserts - TS3650

                    I route a slot on the bottom of the insert along the line of the blade. Of course, you have to do this even with 1/2" material as the blade doesn't recess into the saw far enough.

                    Kirk

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                    • #11
                      Re: Zero Clearance Inserts - TS3650

                      thanks, but i was referring to how you get the 3/4" material of the insert flush with the saw top. any info would be much appreciated.
                      there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Zero Clearance Inserts - TS3650

                        Finer, The way I did it was to rabbet along the outside of the ZCI using a piloted rabbetting bit in the router. I only needed to do this for part of the ZCI, the rest didn't need it.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Zero Clearance Inserts - TS3650

                          I think the question may have referred to getting the insert to sit down on the "shelf" so it's flush with the tabletop. If the TS3650 is like the 2424, that ledge is not much over 1/8" below the top, so you'd have to router away most of the material all around the edges?

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