Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse

How To Post Images

Want to know the how to upload images to your posts? Image Posting Tutorial
See more
See less

Insulating a Finished Garage

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Insulating a Finished Garage

    I live in upstate New York and would like to use my garage as a workshop in the winter. Not foreseeing this desire when the house was built four years ago, I had the builder finish the garage (drywall and paint) but did not have him insulate the three outer walls (the garage is attached to my house).

    Are there any recommendations to insulating a finished structure by putting insulation directly on the drywall or should I go with blown in insulation by drilling holes throughout the structure?

    Thanks for any ideas you can give.

    Jim

  • #2
    Chances are you don't have the amount of plugs or 220 in your garage either. May want to consider pulling off the drywall run wire then insulate with batts and vapour barrier. An insulated door also makes a huge difference

    Comment


    • #3
      Jim,

      I agree. I live down in the Corning area and I think you would be wise to just pull off the drywall and insulate it properly. Considering the cost of new drywall and the few hours of extra work, I think you will still be "ahead of the game". This give you the opportunity to upgrade the wiring, add more plugs, switches, etc. Considering that you will be on concrete, please consider adding ground-fault circuit protectors as a good safety measure.

      Regards,

      CWS

      Comment


      • #4
        FWIW---I'd also tear off the old drywall. Not only might you want to add proper electrical, but as to lumber racks or general storage, tying into the studs (before wall covering goes up) would have added avantages. Also, you can have all the insulation in the world, but you will still need a good, insulated roll up door. I have a one-piece tilt up door and believe me, there are too many air gaps.

        While more expensive, I've seen, over and over, solid or plywood advocated for wall surfaces in a shop, due to the easy of attaching shelving, hanging tools, etc.
        Dave

        Comment


        • #5
          If you do decide to add some elec. outlets, consider installing them between 4½'-5' off the floor. That way, if you lean sheet goods against the wall you will always have easy access to the outlets. One or two installed in the ceiling could also come in handy at times.
          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

          Comment


          • #6
            Another option is to pour something like Persolite into the walls. That's an old brand name of the styrofoam bead insulation frequently used to fill concrete block cavities. The stuff flows like water, doesn't settle (unless the wall has a hole in it), is fire and moisture resistant, and has an R value of around 3.5 per inch. Cut a suitable sized strip of drywall around the top of walls and fill the cavities with a scoop. Insulate the last portion with a fiberglass batt. It's best to stay down a few inches from the top so you don't have to re-finish the corner. Even better, install a row of cabinets, pegboard, or a wood board over the gap so you don't need to refinish drywall. You can also use the opening to facilite wiring upgrades.

            Definitely compare costs first. I haven't bought Persolite in a while but I believe it's comparable to ridgid styrofoam, volume for volume. Its a bit tedious to pur it in, but it should come out much cheaper if you do it yourself and can avoid drywall refinishing.

            Comment


            • #7
              Hold on just a second. Tearing off the sheetrock and then insulating and putting it back is a lot of work and expense for very little benefit. Leaving the sheet rock off will dimish the value of your home - most folks don't share our passion for woodworking and would rather have the garage with sheetrock.

              Consider having cellulose blown into the uninsulated walls - you should be able to find a a local contractor to do the work and it will take only an hour or so. It only takes small holes (about two inches in diameter)cut into the sheetrock near the ceiling - these are easily patched. The cost will be far less than the rip out method and the insulation value (the R-value) will be much higher than batt insulation.

              New electrical work can be run exposed, in conduit, and the garage door improved as you like. One other thought - try going one winter "as is" to see just how much extra it will cost to heat the garage - you may find that adding some supplementary heat to be more economical - especially if you don't intend for this to be your lifetime workshop - that is what I did with my work shed in Maine.

              Whatever - good luck and have fun.

              Comment


              • #8
                My 2¢ worth...because I don't have to do the work [img]smile.gif[/img]

                I would tear off the drywall, spray in the expanding foam insulation. It will seal all the small nooks and crannies as well as offer sound deadening. Then I would put up a wood, say shiplapped pine, for the walls. Makes it stronger and you can screw anything into them.

                Michael

                Comment


                • #9
                  Before you rip out walls you might want to check your local codes. Most areas uphold the national building code requiring 5/8 1 hour fire rated firecode board on all walls adjacent to the living area and the ceiling if it is not partitioned away from the ceiling above the living area.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ray Bersch:
                    Hold on just a second. Tearing off the sheetrock and then insulating and putting it back is a lot of work and expense for very little benefit. Leaving the sheet rock off will dimish the value of your home - most folks don't share our passion for woodworking and would rather have the garage with sheetrock.

                    Consider having cellulose blown into the uninsulated walls - you should be able to find a a local contractor to do the work and it will take only an hour or so. It only takes small holes (about two inches in diameter)cut into the sheetrock near the ceiling - these are easily patched. The cost will be far less than the rip out method and the insulation value (the R-value) will be much higher than batt insulation.

                    New electrical work can be run exposed, in conduit, and the garage door improved as you like. One other thought - try going one winter "as is" to see just how much extra it will cost to heat the garage - you may find that adding some supplementary heat to be more economical - especially if you don't intend for this to be your lifetime workshop - that is what I did with my work shed in Maine.

                    Whatever - good luck and have fun.
                    I am in 100% agreement. You can do a pretty nice wireing job with conduit and save a lot of cash in the process. I, also, would go with the blowin in cellulose.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X