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  • Dust Collector for TS3650

    How do you guys connect a dust collector (4" hose) to the TS3650? Would it be better to get an adapter from 4 to 2 1/2 inches or rig a custom contraption like Bob did so the 4" hose connects directly to the saw?

    Bob, could you please enlighten me on how you did this? Was it difficult and what were some of the things that were important to the efficient collection of dust?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    i just attached a 2 1/2 inch hose long enough to stick out the bottom and then used the adaptor ,seems to work just fine

    Hope this helps
    Nelz

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by ryan.s
      How do you guys connect a dust collector (4" hose) to the TS3650? Would it be better to get an adapter from 4 to 2 1/2 inches or rig a custom contraption like Bob did so the 4" hose connects directly to the saw?

      Bob, could you please enlighten me on how you did this? Was it difficult and what were some of the things that were important to the efficient collection of dust?

      Thanks!
      Ryan,
      I didn't know you are a Darksider like me! Welcome to the cast iron side of life.
      When did this happen? Be nice or I'll spill the beans at BT3. ;-D

      I also connected a piece of 2.5 hose and then used an adaptor to connect to 4"
      Poplar Branch Wood Crafts

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by KenM
        Ryan,
        I didn't know you are a Darksider like me! Welcome to the cast iron side of life.
        When did this happen? Be nice or I'll spill the beans at BT3. ;-D

        I also connected a piece of 2.5 hose and then used an adaptor to connect to 4"
        Hey Ken what's up. The truth is I've never owned a BT3XXX , don't spill the beans. I just stumbled on the site one day and stuck around ever since. Great people over there, not that there aren't great people here as well but I've been addicted to the bargain alerts section.

        In terms of the DC connection I know that the 2.5 hose adaptor is the easiest way to go but I thought increasing the volume of air would make it more efficient. I know at least one person here has done it and was looking for some tips.

        Comment


        • #5
          Well, if you are not going to connect directly to the dust port on the TS then you need to figure out how you will contain the sawdust and then how you will remove it.

          I choose to leave the shroud around the blade as it came from the factory for safety reasons. I thought about attaching a short piece of 2.5" hose and then stepping up to 4" to my DC but I decided to close in the cabinet and connect my 4" DC hose there. This lets any of the larger pieces collect inside the cabinet and not travel on to the DC. they can be easily removed from the rear if need be.

          With the latter method you are trying to draw a vacuum on the cabinet interior and it has so many openings that its pretty much impossible. I installed a sloped bottom that pitches down from the front toward the rear. In the front I kept it out of the way of the blade tilt and elevation mechanism and in the back I brought it down low enough that my 4" hose connection would be below the center of the rear gusset plate. I framed it in with some luan ply, it's nothing fancy. When I was testing the idea I used some stiff cardboard. The sloped bottom encourages the sawdust to collect at the rear.

          With the huge opening in the back of the cabinet where the belt and blade guard protrude from you pretty much have zero vacuum effect in the cabinet. Some people have made covers for this area and I'll bet tat it improves efficiency greatly. I chose to make the bottom slope toward the connection point and leave the rear of the cabinet open, mostly because I would hate to stop in the middle of an operation to remove the cover.

          Underneath the CI table top where it meets the cabinet there are plenty of gaps. On the cabinet front you also have a big slot in the shape of an arc for the elevation hand wheel to travel when the blade is tilted. All these openings and more destroy the effectiveness of sucking the sawdust from the cabinet as opposed to connecting directly to the 2.5" dust port, but still I think I get enough of the sawdust that it was worthwhile and I have not hindered or altered the shroud around the balde in any way. I sya this because I have heard that some people who elected to close in the cabinet have remove the plastic side cover plate from the shroud. I think this is risky from a safety standpoint so I left mine alone, even though it probably improves dust collection and makes blade changes easier.
          ---------------
          Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
          ---------------
          “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
          ---------
          "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
          ---------
          sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            I left the plastic cover on mine and basically just built a slopeing box like Bod D. did and it works good, not perfect but well enough that I only have a small clean up at the end of a day of cutting. Also I initially had the plastic cover off of mine and it seemed to make a bigger mess then when I had it on so I left it on. Around the leg openings I used poster board cut to size to give it a seemless bend so saw dust can't get stuck in any corners. I also had a cover for around the the motor and belt opening but it got to be a pain to remove it anytime I changed the blade angle so i took it off. The majority of the saw dust I get is from around my ZCI, I am going to try and mount a hose on the stock exhaust port and let it hang near the 4" exhaust opening and see if that helps draw it down better other then that it works perfect and only took about an hour to construct and nothing is drilled or screwed into the saw it is all wedged in so I can take it out whenever I want and anyother time it is stuck in there and doesn't move.
            Attached Files
            Last edited by mijfwb; 08-18-2006, 09:46 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              I like that sloping bin. I used the existing flanges and rested halves of plywood on them with a 4" closet flange in the middle, after removing the original shroud. That design left a *lot* of dust in the corners of the cabinet. I reinstalled the flange and added some PVC piping to bring it out to the left side crosspiece and I reinstalled the ply with the 4" flange. It's a lot better but I believe I'll upgrade to mijfwb's design eventually. Besides the built up, having the 4" flange exit in the middle of the bottom of the saw was intensely foolish of me.
              Later,
              Chiz

              Comment


              • #8
                has anyone tried the stock model dust collecter available for the saw by ridgid?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by franklin pug
                  has anyone tried the stock model dust collecter available for the saw by ridgid?
                  Stock dust collector? I looked around but couldn't find one.

                  I just finished building my own. I cut a 1/2" plywood plate for the inside of the saw then cut out an opening for a dust collector funnel (http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=11312). The plywood plate had to be made in two sections in order to wedge it into the saw and then they were joined back together with some 1x2 stock and screws (once the funnel was set in place). Some adhesive caulk was used to attach the funnel and seal around it.

                  Today I bought a portable 1 HP dust collector from HF, so I'll see just how good it all works. I'm sure that this setup will keep much of the sawdust off of my garage floor.
                  Last edited by gpraceman; 08-22-2006, 10:41 PM.

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                  • #10
                    when i bought my saw, it came with an accessories booklet. The TS3650 dust collector is part number AC1098.

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                    • #11
                      You can just get a replacement shroud from Grizzly for about $15 or so. I did this for my 3612 and connected my 4" cyclone and it works great.

                      Michael

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                      • #12
                        FRANKLIN PUG... The biggest problem with the Ridgid dust collection accessory that I bought for my ts 2412 was the 2 1/2" opening. Try to use 4" and block off the open rear of the saw.
                        there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          ts3650 dust collection

                          Just one more way to do it: Before I installed my shop's new Jet dust collection system, I used to use this ancient Sears shop vac on my ts3650. It really does suck up a storm, and the canister holds probably 20 gallons of dust and chips. So when I tried the 4" to 2-1/2" reducer trick on the ts3650, I found I ended up with more dust on the floor than than I did with the shop vac. So now I just leave the shop vac hooked up to the saw. It fits perfectly under the table extension and is on wheels, so it goes wherever the saw goes and there's no 4" hose to trip over. A days' work still leaves a small dustpan of sawdust on the floor right under the saw, but there's almost no dust in the air. Whether or not I use a zci seems to make no noticeable difference.

                          The bottom line is that the 4" hose throttled down to 2-1/2" doesn't pull as well as the 2-1/2" shop vac does.
                          Unanswered Questions
                          are far less dangerous
                          than Unquestioned Answers.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Here's something to consider, use this tabletop dust fitting (as Rockler calls it) but build an adapter collar to fit ti to the bottom of the TS-3650 cabinet, then connect your 4" DC hose directly to it and you are done.

                            http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=11312

                            If you close off the back as much as possible you should have a decent draw in the cabinet and capture better than 90% of the sawdust. I think for $21.98 (including shipping) it's not a bad price. My preference would be to do what Dave and others have done and make a couple panels that are attached with magnetic strips that can easily be removed for bevel cuts.
                            ---------------
                            Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                            ---------------
                            “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                            ---------
                            "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                            ---------
                            sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm onboard with hiloguy. After much frustration plumbing in the shop DC to a board under the saw I went back to the shop vac. I did plumb in and extension to rout the fitting down to the the leg stretcher so that I could easily connect/ disconnect. When I had switched to the DC mode I had a ton of dust collecting in the bottom of the saw (on the plywood) in the corners. When I jostled the saw to move it - not that often - it would shake a bit out. Now, if I cold convince myself that a shark and the overhead plumbing woldn't be in the way I'd have all the dust accounted for.
                              Later,
                              Chiz

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