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  • #16
    "Wow Bob D. Where do you find info on wood like that?"

    Yes, there are many sites with enough material to keep you so busy you won't even have time to use your tools :-)

    You can try here for a fairly long list of woodworking related sites:
    http://home.comcast.net/~sparc/woodw..._bookmarks.htm

    The one I looked at was this: Hardwood Information Center
    "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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    • #17
      I thank you greatly Bob D. Two excellent links.
      M2C1

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Dana G.
        Same issues with Melamine?
        Melamine is just a particle board (weaker than MDF) with a colored coating on it. Melamine is the second from lowest of the low, with regular part. board being the lowest)

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        • #19
          mdf

          I would use plywood and solid pine , . I use MDF for stiles and rails on small rasied panel doors that are painted. Like anything else MDF has its purpose , in your case consider your options. Good luck

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          • #20
            I use MDf for all sorts of things however you have to know it's limits. For instance it won't work as an unsupported 4 foot shelf. It will split if the right screw/nails are not used. It will water damage and it is heavy.

            I use it where I would use wood or ply and it will be painted. I have also found that if you finish it in tung oil and a coat of poly it looks alot like leather.

            While dusty it is fairly easy to cut, shapes good with a router and once painted it pretty stable.

            I usually use it for stacking cubes that as so popular now, bed platforms, anything I need a really flat surface on, jigs/fixtures, templates, architectural mouldings, decorative pieces and router cut mock raised panel door.

            My wife had me contruct 8 columns that were fluted to go between some mirrors. They had to be about 3 inches proud of the mirror and have top and bottom finals that were intricately routed. I use MDF and was able to cut rout and finish the columns so the finished product looked like marble. Had I used anything else the cost would have been out of sight.

            Like everything else you just have to know what your doing and the limitations of the product.
            Rev Ed

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