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  • Treating Table Saw Top

    Hello All,
    I was wondering if it is necessary to apply any kind of treatment to the cast iron table top and extensions on the TS2424 table saw? My shop is heated but gets a slight condensation at times when it is cold out and I open the big overhead door. My other tools usually get a light coating of WD-40 and wiped off, but I don’t think I want to go that route with the table saw top. I guess I am maybe a bit over protective but I like keeping my stuff looking good. I welcome any thoughts…
    Regards,<br /><br />Big Johnson<br /><br />Pictures: <a href=\"http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php</a>

  • #2
    I put a heavy coating of WD-40 on mine, and lightly sanded it with a power finishing sander and ScotchBrite (which makes a devil of a mess, by the way). Then I wiped the WD-40 off well, using bunches of paper towels. Then a coat of Johnson's Paste Wax.

    This was a little over 2 1/2 years ago. Since then, I renew the wax whenever the surface is no longer slippery. No rust, period. Unheated garage, Dallas, Texas.

    Dave

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    • #3
      Dave,
      What kind of grit did you use with the sander? I've been wondering about sanding the top of my saw as it is not finely ground like the jointer or miter bases.
      What do you think, Jake? My TS2424 top is very rough from the grinding at the factory and I was wondering if there was a good way to get it a lot smoother and polished. I haven't done anything yet for fear of taking it out of flat before running it by you.
      Thanks! [img]smile.gif[/img]
      - Tim

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      • #4
        Tim, I used ScotchBrite green. If you aren't familiar with ScotchBrite, it is an "artificial steel wool", maybe a quarter inch thick and kind of spongy.

        I too would be a bit concerned about power sanding with a hard-backed sandpaper on a top. If done, you'd have to be reasonably careful to keep the sander moving.

        Something else I should probably emphasize. I do this with a quarter-sheet finishing sander. If you try it with a random orbital sander, expect WD-40 glop to be flung to all corners of your shop.

        Dave

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        • #5
          Dave,
          Does your method take down any of the metal or is it more of a rust remover? I like the tops on the Delta cabinet saws as they seem to be ground quite smooth. Wilke Machinery is 10 minutes from my house and I've thought about seeing if they'll grind/polish my top for me. The thought of a complete disassembly to have the top retooled is not pleasing.
          Hey, everybody, how smooth is your saw top? Mine is pretty rough by comparison to other brands...Still love the Ridgid though.
          Jake,
          Any thoughts about gringing/sanding the top a little smoother?

          Thanks
          - Tim

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          • #6
            Hey Tim
            I read on another board that you can use Pentrol to remove the rust. I like Mr. Dave's idea though. The only problem that i have had is locating Johnson paste wax. Does anyone know if you can use carnuba wax. A car wax mfg.called Mother's has a pure carnuba wax. what everyones thoughts I would also like to shine my new saw top as well. thanks and Merry Xmas [img]smile.gif[/img]

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            • #7
              Tim, mine shows a fair amount of grinding marks. ScotchBrite'ing it rounds them over some, but doesn't make it smooth like a planed surface is (pretty sure that Unisaw top you are referring to is planed, not scraped). Functionally, there is little difference so long as the machining marks don't damage the surface of your stock.

              I would be cautious of having an unassembled top ground/planed. Remember that everything on the saw in use is hanging from that top. Removing all the "stuff" and flattening it might cause it to be unflat when the works are reattached. This is easier on a cabinet saw top, since none of the guts are attached to the top.

              Bill, there is nothing particularly magic about Johnson's, just a furniture wax. Around here, you find it in the floor care section of the supermarket. Minwax makes a furniture wax that works just the same.

              Automotive wax works fine also, IF (IF!) it has no silicone in it. Silicone is certain death for some furniture finishes, especially lacquer. The only way I know to discover if a particular wax has silicone in it is to call the manufacturer's information line and ask specifically.

              Merry Christmas to you too, and please, no Mister.

              Dave

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              • #8
                Hey guy's,
                I took a wag at waxing the top of my saw. I went to the store and looked at about 20 different products and dint care for any of them. So I went home and started looking through my car care cabinet. I found a can of Eagle-One Carnuba paste wax in a can. I read the contents, which contained no silicon’s, this was recommended on the postings above. I applied 5 applications to the top and WOW what a nice surface do I have now. The top is shiny and to smooth that I can slide a rag across and it will drop on the floor. I think most of the milling marks have filled and smoothed out. I need to follow the same steps on the extensions tonight. I have some cutting to do when I get this completed, so maybe I will report back if I notice a big difference from the raw state the top was previously in.

                Billiam,
                I bet the Mothers wax would work great...

                [img]smile.gif[/img]
                Regards,<br /><br />Big Johnson<br /><br />Pictures: <a href=\"http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php</a>

                Comment


                • #9
                  I bought a TS2424 not to long ago and wanted to treat the top also. First I use steel wool and put a few good coats of car wax on it. I thought I had done a good job. Then while looking at the New Yankee Workspop site I picked up on that Norm sands his tp periodically and put a coat of wax on it. I sanded my top with 150 grit sand paper by hand. I tried my finishing sander and it started to leave too many scratches so I went back to hand sanding. The results were extreamly satisfying. My top is very smooth. After I use it some more next time I will sand with 220 grit.
                  Justin

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