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  • finishing drywall

    I am redoing a room in my house, and i really hate finishing drywall.....yuk..yuk..yuk!!

  • #2
    I used my Ridgid 5" orbital attached to my Ridgid Professional Wet/Dry vac with virtually no dust. You can get adpaters to connect to most shop vacs or use a rubber coupling reducer from the plumbing section of your hardware store.

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    • #3
      I have redone many rooms in my house. I hate drywall, paint, and just about everything associated with renovating an old home. The next house, I will have built and let some one else deal with all of the yucky jobs.

      Good luck. Remember, more thin coats means less sanding.
      Character is doing the right thing when no one is looking.

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      • #4
        I have been doing drywall work since 1978 so I have a lot of experience with it. If you have to use a power sander to sand it out. You are leaving too much wet mud on the joint.

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        • #5
          Ditto on the too much mud issue, Reb, but I think that he was addressing the messy dust issue. It perked up my ears when I read about using the vac/ sander combo!
          Later,
          Chiz
          Later,
          Chiz

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          • #6
            I use the wet-sponge technique, along with being very careful to only apply thin coats of mud. Takes longer, but it works fine for me, and I don't to pay any vet bills for my cat who has asthma...(grin)
            Nolo illigitamati carborundum

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            • #7
              I actually don't mind doing drywall. I use thin coats and it usually takes three to four to even out most seams, corners, etc. Biggest challenge is patience. Wet sanding is best and I vac the area before applying the next coat to keep from tracking the dust all over. I hesitate to use a power sander as in many cases this is rather harsh on the tool and will often void the warranty on some.

              Having good lighting is a big help on the final coats so you can check for any low spots, dings, etc.

              CWS

              [ 05-07-2005, 11:18 AM: Message edited by: CWSmith ]

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              • #8
                My biggest problem with drywall is that they come from the factory with factory edges that kind of set inward so that you can get your mud flat. How do you account for this when you cut a piece and have to use a non factory edge? Is there some kind of scoring or tapering tool to accomplish this or is it all about how you put the mud on?
                \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                • #9
                  IT'S ALL ABOUT HOW YOU HANG THE BOARD AND WHERE THE JOINTS ARE LOCATED. TYPICALLY THE TOP SHEET TO THE CEILING BOARD. THE BOTTOM SHEET TO THE FLOOR AND THEN FILL IN THE VOID BETWEEN THE 2 SHEETS. THIS GIVES YOU A MUD JOINT AT 4' OFF THE FLOOR AND THEN EVERY 8-12' IN YOUR RUN, DEPENDING ON WHAT LENGTH BOARD YOU BUY. FLOATING THE MUD OUT APPROX. 12''- 16'' BEYOND THE JOINT WILL GIVE YOU THAT SMOOTH TAPER. IF YOU WANT A SMOOTH WALL THEN TOP COAT THE SURFACE. OR CHEAT AND TEXTURE / ORANGEPEEL THE WALLS.
                  P.S ACUSTOCAL CEILINGS WILL HIDE JUST ABOUT ANY INPERFECTION. TRY THAT ON YOUR WALLS. HA HA.
                  RICK

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                  • #10
                    I always hung up and down.

                    Unless I am missing something, the technique you describe is still going to have the problem. As I am sure all of you know when you hang two pieces of drywall side by side, your factory edge tapers. You put your knife at a 90 deg angle at that point and you will see an indentation. That is to compensate for the mud.

                    Even in hanging one on top and one on the bottom, you still have to fill that middle. YOu can only get a factory or tapered edge on one side. The other side will be a cut side and you will not have that taper. it will be flat if not stick out from the other piece. There have been at times where I have cheated it and used like a hole saw or a dremel to cut the cut edge to an angle to compensate for the dip. I don't know that it is right, but that is the way it seems to work. I am sure I am doing it wrong...is there a special tool and/or technique in use here?
                    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                    • #11
                      SPACE LIKE I SAID YOU HAVE TO FLOAT THE WALL APPROX. 12''- 16'' ON EACH SIDE OF THE JOINT TO FEATHER THE MUD. TYPICALLY HANGING THE BOARDS VERTICALLY IS USED MORE ON COMMERCIAL WORK WITH STEEL STUDS. IT'S MORE OF AN ILLUSION IN HIDING A JOINT, THAN A STRAIGHT FLAT SURFACE. THE JOINT IN THE MIDDLE AT THE 4' HEIGHT TENDS TO HIDE BETTER. YOU HAVE NO BASE OR CROWN MOULDING TO WORRY ABOUT THE FLATNESS. KEEP IN MIND THAT AT THE CEILING JOINT Y0U STILL HAVE A TAPE JOINT WITH THE WALL AND CEILING SURFACE. THIS IS NOT FLOATED AS FAR OUT AS THE MIDDLE SEAM. APPROX. 8''. IF IT'S SMOOTH WALL FINISH THEN A SKIM COAT ON THE ENTIRE SURFACE WILL WORK BETTER. REMBER TEXTURE COVERS MOST DEFECTS. SOMETHING TO ABOUT.

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                      • #12
                        "IT'S MORE OF AN ILLUSION ...".

                        Ahhh, kinda like politics!
                        Later,
                        Chiz

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