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  • Band saw alignment question (two parts)

    Any help on either of these two different (I think) issues would be greatly appreciated. [Full disclaimer-- new to both bandsaw and forum.. so be gentle!

    First, I think I have it set up reasonably close to correct (at least according to the specs/instructions) BUT the blade is dangerously close to the edge of my insert-- towards the front of the saw. I am afraid of the blade drifting a bit and catching a tooth on the edge of the insert... plus it just doesnt seem right.

    Second.... there is a significant amount of vibration it seems. I've tightened most everything and the machine seems level, and maybe it is just that I am not used to band saws, but I would like some suggestions here because I think the vibrations would be enough to cause some effect in my cuts.

    Well thanks... I think I'll stop here and see how this forum thing works.

  • #2
    I don't have experience with the Ridgid bandsaw, so maybe another owner can jump in here with first-hand advice. However, here are a couple of thoughts on the problems you described:

    Blade coming too close to edge of insert - Double check the upper and lower guide adjustments to ensure that they are not pushing the blade toward one side or the other. The blade should NOT touch either the left or right guide blocks, but should pass down, in a straight line to the lower wheel. When looking straight on into the blade, the guide blocks should be adjusted evenly on either side of the blade, with the clearance on either side about the thickness of a folded dollar bill.

    When looking at the side of the blade, the blocks should be adjusted to center or be slightly toward the back, between the back edge of the blade and the bottom of the tooth gullet.

    The thrust bearing should be adjusted just behind the blade, but not touching. I usually turn the upper wheel by hand (saw unplugged of course!) and observe the thrust bearing so that it does not turn when the blade advances. However, the thrust bearing must be close enough so that when pressure is applied (by feeding your wood), the blade will only move ever so slightly and the thrust bearing keeps it from being pushed back. If the thrust bearing is too far back, the blade can be pushed back to a point where the guide blocks will strike the teeth gullets. (NOT a good thing!)

    If the blade is still too close to the insert, then check the table to see if it can be adjusted; perhaps it is not centered on the blade. I believe the insert is plastic, so I doubt that any damage will be done if the blade strikes it... other than cutting a new width to the insert. The insert itself may be off (slot not centered properly), in which case there isn't much you can do, other than replacing it.

    Regarding the vibration - that can come from many things and I believe one of the most common complaints is a poorly adjusted belt. I think if you search the forum, you'll find that many owners have replaced the stock belt with a link belt and this, reportedly, helps a great deal.

    Vibration can be caused by the belt, loose mountings, or poorly balanced wheels, among other things. I do recall hat vibration with this Ridgid model is a fairly common complaint, but in most cases (as I recall) it was contributed to the drive belt.

    I hope this helps,

    CWS

    Comment


    • #3
      The only thing I can add is that the factory blade is a POS and you will wonder what you are doing wrong when you cant cut straight no matter what you do, also most of them have an offset at the weld so you see a pronounced wiggle as the blade goes by the insert.
      My recommendation is for timberwolf blades, search the forum for timberwolf for many recommendations of the same blade

      Comment


      • #4
        agreed

        I know, I'm being redundant but:

        Replace the blade. I have a 3TPI, 1/2" timberwolf.
        Replace the belt with a v-belt (you'll need about 44"). That solved most of my vibration problems and will let you move the motor back so you can actually open the bottom door to put on your new blade.

        As to the insert. The blade isn't centered in the insert. This will allow clearance when you tilt the table. My blade is about 3/32" from the right edge of the insert.

        Can you attach a photo?

        Comment


        • #5
          bandsaw alighnment suggestions: reaction

          First of all, thanks to those of you that took the time to respond. Although new to this, I've been reading enough to follow the comments... which scares me!

          I will try to attach photo when I get home.... fortunately photgraphy is a previous hobby and I am actually ok at that one!

          Comment


          • #6
            "Replace the belt with a v-belt (you'll need about 44"). "

            I think cjh20 meant to say replace the v-belt with a LINK BELT.
            ---------------
            Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
            ---------------
            “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
            ---------
            "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
            ---------
            sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks Bob

              Yes, Bob is of course correct. I meant: replace the V-belt with a link belt.

              I've been like this most of the day:

              Name:  db59a58dfd08d994365400903f39b737.bmp
Views: 1
Size:  76.2 KB
              Last edited by cjh20; 08-28-2006, 11:57 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have a new 14" Ridgid BS and initially the bandsaw worked OK with some vibration. However, I changed out the OEM sawblade with another from Lowe's and the blade would not stay on the tires/rims despite my adjustments. As you have done here, I got onto the net and researched every WW forum I could find to try to fix the problem or else the BS was going back to the HD store where I bought it.

                Two of the more prominent reasons given for the blade coming off the wheels are 1) the OEM rubber tires are POS and 2) the OEM blade is a POS. Replacement of the rubber/neoprene tires with urethane tires is recommended as well as procuring decently manufactured sawblades.

                I did both. Bought the orange urethane tires from Rockler on-line at approx $25/pr and a couple of timberwolf blades at about $16.00 each. I installed the orange tires which started out to be a problem where they seem to be too small for the tire/rim but I soaked them in hot water and with a couple of flat screwdrivers to use as pry bars, and an extra set of hands, they went on and fit perfectly. I also installed the new bandsaw blade and cranked up the saw.

                The BS now runs like a well-oiled machine with little or no vibration and no drift of the blade on the tires - stays centered. Of the two fixes, I think the urethane tires was the most important and probably some cheap $9.99 Lowe's sawblades could probably be used with these urethane tires. I would recommend the better brand of blades, however.

                Wish you luck.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Checkout the October issue of Wood, there is an article by a fellow named Michael Fortune on how to tweak a bandsaw for maximum performance and although I have not read the article it appears by the pictures that they are demonstrating how to tweak the Ridgid.

                  Woodslayer

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Same with John W. at FWW who included a Ridgid in his review of 14" bandsaws.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by woodslayer
                      Checkout the October issue of Wood, there is an article by a fellow named Michael Fortune on how to tweak a bandsaw for maximum performance and although I have not read the article it appears by the pictures that they are demonstrating how to tweak the Ridgid.

                      Woodslayer
                      Same with John W. at FWW who included a Ridgid in his review of 14" bandsaws.


                      Seems everytime they need to give an article on Band Saw tune up they choose Ridgid. Does this say anything about Ridgid quality?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        "Does this say anything about Ridgid quality?"

                        Yes, it says that their BS is consistent in that they all need a serious alignment/balancing/tune-up once you get it home and out of the box.

                        But to be fair, as someone else on here said recently, a BS is probably the most finicky machine in the shop, and needs more TLC than any other tool to keep it operating properly.
                        ---------------
                        Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                        ---------------
                        “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                        ---------
                        "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                        ---------
                        sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                        Comment

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