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Matt

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  • Matt

    I have the MS1290LZ.
    The dust collection bag gets about 10% of the dust generated.
    I recently bought a 2hp 4" dust collector and connected a 2 1/2 hose to the dust outlet on the saw with an adapter to the vacuum system. There seems to be great suction at the inlet by the blade but none of the dust generated goes even close to the inlet - it all shoots dead flat off the blade instead of going up at the approx 30 degree angle that would shoot it into the dust inlet. I still end up with 90% of the dust in the air and on the floor.

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks

  • #2
    That is the nature of the beast where it concerns dust collection and miter saws, they are notorious for their lack of ability to capture the sawdust they generate. Short of building a dust collection shroud around your saw you're pretty much stuck with what ya got.
    ================================================== ====
    ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

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    • #3
      Check out Woodsmith magazine Vol.28/No. 166 Someone sent in there design for a MS dusk collecting shroud , he won a new Router for it , it may help you collect more dust give it a try. Hope it helps you out. good luck.

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      • #4
        That's what I did. I made my own dust shroud that hangs on the wall of my shop. It is connected to my shop DC system. The shroud is sized and positioned so I can drive my SCMS mounted on the Ridgid MS-UV right up in front of it and go to work. When/If I need to take the MS on the road, I only have to wheel it away with nothing to disconnect and nothing altered on the MS or the MS-UV. The shroud is basically a box, with the front side open. It is sized in length and height to accommodate my SCMS (DW-708) mounted on the MS-UV. The bottom is sloped back toward the wall at about a 30 degree angle. In the bottom is a 4" DC hose connection. To keep any big stuff from getting in there I placed a piece of peg board with 1/4" holes (roughly 14" deep x 40" wide) over the bottom to make a false floor. The whole idea behind this design was to create a negative pressure zone right behind the saw that would draw all the saw dust into it. When determining the size of your box you need to thing about the swing radius of the saw if its a SCMS in both the 90 and compound angle cut positions.

        You can see it in the background in this photo (you'll need to scroll all the way to the right, this is a wide panoramic of my shop).

        http://home.comcast.net/~sparc/shop_1.htm
        Last edited by Bob D.; 09-08-2006, 06:55 AM.
        "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
        John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bob D.
          That's what I did. I made my own dust shroud that hangs on the wall of my shop. It is connected to my shop DC system. The shroud is sized and positioned so I can drive my SCMS mounted on the Ridgid MS-UV right up in front of it and go to work. When/If I need to take the MS on the road, I only have to wheel it away with nothing to disconnect and nothing altered on the MS or the MS-UV. The shroud is basically a box, with the front side open. It is sized in length and height to accommodate my SCMS (DW-708) mounted on the MS-UV. The bottom is sloped back toward the wall at about a 30 degree angle. In the bottom is a 4" DC hose connection. To keep any big stuff from getting in there I placed a piece of peg board with 1/4" holes (roughly 14" deep x 40" wide) over the bottom to make a false floor. The whole idea behind this design was to create a negative pressure zone right behind the saw that would draw all the saw dust into it. When determining the size of your box you need to thing about the swing radius of the saw if its a SCMS in both the 90 and compound angle cut positions.
          Can you post a picture of your setup?
          SSG, U.S. Army
          Retired
          K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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