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  • Today I was bored

    I have owned a BS 1400-2 for a while now that has always had a vibration problem. Today I decided to fix it. After removing the blade, the belt and the wheel brush I spun the wheels and just as I thought they were out of balance. After spinning and drilling a 1/4" hole in the heavy spot on the wheel it runs like a singer sewing machine now. I had to drill around 12 holes in the web of each wheel. This thing runs so smooth now it even passes the nickel test. What is amazing is all the holes I drilled are between two of the wheel spokes on each wheel. I find it hard to believe the a company like Ridgid would allow such shoddy workmanship on an other wise great tool.
    Last edited by TOD; 09-08-2006, 03:52 PM.
    SSG, U.S. Army
    Retired
    K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

  • #2
    In a way I'm sorry that you posted after-the-fact. While I may be wrong in presuming so, it seems to me that this is definitely a "defect in workmanship and materials" and you deserve to have a new set of wheels that were properly balanced. Probably your drilling doesn't affect the integrity of the wheel, but new set of wheels may have been a preferance.

    However, IMO your point is well taken and it certainly sounds to me like Quality Assurance sure wasn't what it should have been.

    CWS

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    • #3
      CAN WE ALL SAY WARRENTY-VOID

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      • #4
        Hey TOD.... I was sorry to read about your problem. It's a terrible thing to be bored, but look what it got ya. A sweet running bandsaw for $350, an afternoon of fun and excitement, and an interesting day. I just read an article about the tune up method you just described. Glad to see it works. Like a Singer, ehhh, and the nickel test too. That's sweeeeet. I'll bet it compares favorably to one of those $500 Deltas or Jets now.

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        • #5
          Here's an idea - maybe you can start a web page and provide a wheel balancing service !
          I wonder if one could use a balancing machine like the ones in the motorcycle shops?

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          • #6
            Glad to hear you tweaked your BS up, my Griz will only keep a nickel on edge for a short duration. I have always intended to tweak mine but have never got around to experimenting with it, so this sounds like something to investigate. For clarification purposes for the somewhat mechanically challenged among us, how does one determine the heavy spot, is it as simple as spinning the wheel and gravity will allow the heavy spot to settle to the lowest point? Does a smoother running band saw produce smoother cuts, I hear claims of individuals resawing and having no ridges to contend with, not on my BS.

            Woodslayer

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            • #7
              Originally posted by woodslayer
              For clarification purposes for the somewhat mechanically challenged among us, how does one determine the heavy spot, is it as simple as spinning the wheel and gravity will allow the heavy spot to settle to the lowest point?
              Woodslayer
              When you spin the the wheel the heavy spot will settle to the bottom. The wheel will reverse direction several times until heavy spots settles to the botom. If the wheel just stops and does not reverse mark the bottom and spin again if it just stops and the mark you made is not on the bottom wheel is in balance.
              SSG, U.S. Army
              Retired
              K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

              Comment


              • #8
                Here's the article I read on a bandsaw tune up. They go into a lot of detail, and give a good explanation of truing an out of balance wheel.
                http://www.woodcraft.com/articleprin...?ArticleID=223

                TOD, this sounded like what you said you did, and it explains how they determined where to drill Woodslayer.

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                • #9
                  Please don't drill into Woodslayer, he's a nice fella and has just the right amount of holes now.
                  Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                  • #10
                    Awww come on BD, one or two more holes, just for balance

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                    • #11
                      Man, you guys got me in trouble with the wife (too many new parts). I too decided to tweak my 'new' (refurb'ed) 1402 and installed the new parts today. I also balanced the wheel. Get this. Three 3/16" and three 3/8" hole on either side of one of the webs. It *still* has a tendency to drift to that spot about half of the time. I got too scared to go any further. I added the urethane tires, link belt and cool blocks and I'm still waiting on the backordered Timberwolf blade. Holy cow! What an improvement already!
                      Later,
                      Chiz

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                      • #12
                        Nice idea about using the pencil to mark the high spots, Alan. I was going to get my indicator and magetic base out but I like the simplicity of your idea. My hand is still steady even if other parts have given out!
                        Later,
                        Chiz

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