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  • Cutting an angle on the table saw

    I'm ready to cut some 1x4's to make knockdown sawhorses. The plans call for cutting a 15 degree miter at the top of the legs for the stretchers to fit in (see attached diagram). Any tips on best way to cut this 15 degree/36 in long piece on my table saw, i.e. is this what a taper jig is for. Thanks.

    By the way, the plans were from papadan's website for absolutely free plans, so no worry about anyone's copyright infringement...
    Attached Files

  • #2
    A taper jig (which I happened to use today for the first time ever) would be for if you needed to taper the long dimension of the legs (which you don't). You just need to bevel the ends of the 2 x 4's 15 degrees. You would use the miter gauge at 0 degrees to feed the stock horizontally past the blade. You tilt the blade 15 degrees (only needs to be approximate).

    You may want to also cut complemetary 15 degree angles on the opposite ends of the wood so that it sits flat on the ground.

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    • #3
      I recently made some similar cuts on 2x4's, but I have a MS, which makes it easier.

      A 15 deg. taper cut exceeds the angle ability of my home made taper jig, but may be within the range for the commerical ones. Using one of those jigs would probably lead you to turning the jig around and feeding it into the saw opposite its normal direction of feed inorder to keep the work on the table as it passes through the blade. Holding the work piece tight against the jig may be difficult in that arrangement. I've not used the typical commerical tapering jig, so I'm speculating on this point.

      To make this cut on a table saw I would first cut a piece of plywood or other sheet goods (3/4" thk) to approximately a 12" or 18" square, then cut 1 edge to a 15 deg angle to its opposite side (75 deg corner angle). This angled side would be the surface along which the work piece would be held. The piece of plywood would be held against the miter gauage, set at 0 deg. with the angled side toward the blade. To hold the plywood against the miter gauge I would fasten on a vertical piece of scrap (say a 1x2 or 2x4 about 6 or 8 inches long) parrallel to the miter gauge and use a clamp to hold it against the miter gauge. Then to hold the work piece against the I would use either some double sided tape or set several brads into the plywood, with their heads clipped off. To feed the work through the saw I would use a push block to help hold the work piece against and into the plywood while pushing the miter gauge through the saw.

      Some times it is easier to get out the hand saw for these types of cuts and clamp a guide board along the cut line.
      Dick

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      • #4
        Angle cut

        Dick, I agree with the handsaw idea. For the short pieces I need to trim off, I think my hand can remain steady enough with a 6" guide/square to help out. My Japanese pull saw will probably suffice. I'm just anxious to use my table saw whenever I can, but don't want to complicate things just to do so. Thanks for the advice.

        Dan

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        • #5
          I am with you now. I was thinking about the horizontal top of the struts, not the vertical cut.

          I agree, easiest with a hand saw. Second choice - wing it with a circular saw. Or a miter saw.

          Also, can't you clamp the piece to the miter fence and run it on the table saw?

          Also you are making a saw horse, not a piece of furniture. I can't see all the special jig making, or using a guide board to cut with a handsaw.

          Overkill??

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          • #6
            To make that cut on your TS set your miter gauge to a 75 degree angle. Once you've figured out how far down the board you want the cut to start, line that mark up with the cut line on the saw and make the cut. The procedure will be the same no matter which side of the blade you make the cut. The only difference being the direction in which you set the miter gauge to the 75 degree position.
            Last edited by BadgerDave; 09-11-2006, 10:04 AM.
            Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by BadgerDave
              To make that cut on your TS set your miter gauge to a 75 degree angle. Once you've how far down the board you want the cut to start, line that mark up with the cut line on the saw and make the cut. The procedure will be the same no matter which side of the blade you make the cut. The only difference being the direction in which you set the miter gauge to the 75 degree position.
              If he is like me and only has a stock miter gauge he can't set it to 75 degrees. The stock gauge for a 3650 only goes to 60 degrees.
              SSG, U.S. Army
              Retired
              K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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              • #8
                Ya got me there TOD and of course you're correct, the RIDGID stock miter gauge can't make that cut.

                I happen to have an Incra 1000SE miter gauge which can make that cut and based my answer on using it. Sometimes its easy to forget that not all alike tools have the same capabilities.
                Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by BadgerDave
                  Ya got me there TOD and of course you're correct, the RIDGID stock miter gauge can't make that cut.

                  I happen to have an Incra 1000SE miter gauge which can make that cut and based my answer on using it. Sometimes its easy to forget that not all alike tools have the same capabilities.
                  I guess one could cut a 15 degree angle on a scrap piece, set the miter gauge to zero, hold the piece aganst that and cut the angle. But I would just free hand it since it is just for saw horses. I know that free hand is considered unsafe by many so don't yell at me for saying it.
                  SSG, U.S. Army
                  Retired
                  K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by danimal1208
                    Any tips on best way to cut this 15 degree/36 in long piece on my table saw, i.e. is this what a taper jig is for. Thanks.
                    Not that it answers your question but I tend to stay away form those type cuts on the TS. If you have the tools available, I would cut it just on the proud side of the cut line with a bandsaw or jigsaw which ever happened to be handier and then clean it up with a few swipes of a hand plane. Two-minute job.

                    Woodslayer

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                    • #11
                      If you aren't comfortable with using a hand saw, draw the line, clamp on a guide board, and use your circular saw. No need to over-engineer it.
                      Practicing at practical wood working

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Gofor
                        If you aren't comfortable with using a hand saw, draw the line, clamp on a guide board, and use your circular saw. No need to over-engineer it.
                        I agree.
                        I would just freehand it with a circ saw - it's not like you're building fine furniture...

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