Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Which Forrest blade do you have for your TS2400 or 3650?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Which Forrest blade do you have for your TS2400 or 3650?

    I've had enough of the stock blade on my ts2400, it is utterly terrible. the darn thing leaves circular marks on everything (fence and table are aligned beautifuly).....so i'm going for the best.

    do you have the thin kerf (3/32) or the regular (1/8)?

    if you have the thin kerf, do you need the dampner that forrest sells?

    i'm mostly going to be ripping for the time being (less than 2"), with very little crosscutting. what's the best for all around performance?

    also, where's the best place to get the zci?


    thanks

  • #2
    I have the full kerf version on my 2424, as far as store-bought ZCI’s, I like the Leecraft brand sold at Woodcraft.

    Woodslayer

    Comment


    • #3
      My Forrest is the 3/32" TK and it's been awesome. Can't tell any improvements from the stiffener and have never had a deflection issue. The TK is easier on your motor and less expensive.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by CheekyMonkeyWrench
        ............i'm mostly going to be ripping for the time being (less than 2"), with very little crosscutting. what's the best for all around performance?
        Cheeky, if ripping will be the primary function of your TS then maybe a Forrest blade isn't the best choice. They make great blades but they don't offer a blade solely designed as a ripping blade.

        A better choice might be the Freud LU87R010 thin kerf rip blade. Amazon currently has them on sale for a great price, http://www.amazon.com/Freud-LU87R010...3?ie=UTF8&s=hi

        Personally, I make my own ZCI's but for store bought Peachtree has about the best prices I've found, http://www.ttrackusa.com/zeroclearanceinserts.htm If your TS is the TS2400LS, the model of ZCI you want is the #20005.
        ================================================== ====
        ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

        Comment


        • #5
          I agree with Dave's advice to use a ripping blade for doing primarily ripping instead of an expensive WWII. The ripping blade will be much more efficient at the task, will put less strain on the motor, and will spare the WWII from brute bull work that'll dull it prematurely. My WWII is a 3/32" TK by the way...no dampener....that's just their bonus money!

          The LU87 is a good rip blade that's priced right, but there's currently an unbeatable deal being offered by a Leitz distributor on Woodnet. He's got a Leitz made Irwin Woodworking series ripper made in Germany for $11 (not the Marathon line)... it's identical to the high end Schumacher & Sohn blade that sells for $47 and is also made by Leitz. It's a 10" TK 24T ripper with flat top grind, and has been referred to as a "ripping animal" by several who've tried it. I ordered a 2nd one after trying it....my "former" ripper was a well respected Freud LM72 which is now warming the bench! A good ripper is handy to have even if you do pick up a WWII at some point.

          http://www.forums.woodnet.net/ubbthr...v=#Post2572591

          Comment


          • #6
            Forrest WWII 40T thin kerf.

            Comment


            • #7
              Another vote for Forrest TK

              I second the motion: it's awesome. Never have had a problem with it and I cut lots of hardwoods, sometimes 2" thick Koa, Mango, etc. Never had a better all-around blade, and I have stacks of 'em!
              Unanswered Questions
              are far less dangerous
              than Unquestioned Answers.

              Comment

              Working...
              X