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  • Blade Recommendations

    Hi all,
    As I mentioned before I am new to woodworking and am having a blast.
    Most of my projects to date have been more on the simple side building a my own enclosed router cabinet,
    table saw/router jigs and fixtures and some miscelleneous trinkets, etc. Most of this has been preliminary staging
    to start the kind of projects that I really want to undertake. I am planning to make (2) dressers for my daughters, Christmas gifts, and other home furnsihings.

    Up until now I have been using my stock Ridgid blade and have had acceptable results for what I have been doing.
    However, I would like to invest in a better blade with better performance.

    There is a plethera of blades out there to choose from, a bit overwhelming.

    What do you use and why?

    Thanks.
    Kurt
    (Cool! I still have 10 fingers!)

  • #2
    Here's a good recent thread you might find interesting,

    http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...ht=3650+blades

    If you really want to get confused, do a search on, 3650 blades

    Have fun...

    Comment


    • #3
      I just changed my stock Ridgid Blade (on the TS2400LS) with a:

      Freud LU87R010 10" x 24-Tooth, 5/8" Arbor Perma-SHIELD Coated Thin Kerf Saw Blade.

      Thin kerf is awesome, and the coating they put on the blade is money. Amazon is having a 10% off sale, and it was only $35 shipped.

      I primarily rip (have a 12 CSMS that I primarily use for my miters, etc), so I took the advice of the kind folks here and bought that bad boy.

      It basically leaves a sanded finish to the side, as opposed to that piece of garbage Ridgid stock blade that nearly ruined some expensive Azec trimboard. The ridgid blade left gnarly circular marks on everything....including ply.

      I look forward to getting a thin kerf WWII when the need arises.

      Look forward to getting a

      Comment


      • #4
        There are alot of choices...alot of good choices too, but alot depends on what you want the blade to do. Good quality makes a difference and so does the blade's geometry and design. A 3/32" (0.91-.100") thin kerf blade is well suited for your saw, and if you stick with the high quality choices, you'll have no issues with deflection. There's a fine line between clean cut and practicality....all things being equal (even though they're not), a higher tooth blade will typically cut cleaner than a lower tooth blade, but will come at the expense of feed rate, which can lead to burning. The exceptions come into play when you compare a top shelf blade like the Forrest WWII 40T to a more average blade like an Irwin 80T....the WWII will make the cleaner cut and will rip faster and will stay sharp longer and will endure more sharpenings....the initial expense is the biggest drawback, but they go on sale in the low $70's if you pay attention....really a fairly small percentage of your saw system considering is the number one component.

        I'm not one to change to a specialty blade for every different type of cut or material, so I tend to lean towards a high quality general purpose blade like a 40T Forrest WWII or Ridge Carbide TS2000. They're very good at alot of types of cuts in a wide variety of materials, and are typically clean cutting enough that I never have a need for my 80T crosscut blades. The Freud LU88R010 60T blade is also outstanding and is an excellent value at ~ $50 if the Forrest seems expensive. It's labeled as a crosscut blade but it's versatile enough to work well as a general purpose blade. It cuts a tad cleaner than my WWII but it won't rip quite as asggressively as the Forrest or TS2000...though it's fairly respectable up to about 6/4"....I really love this blade and can't imagine getting more bang for the buck on a regular basis.

        You'd be wise to grab a 24T ripping blade for really heavy tasks in addition to your primary blade. The cut won't be as smooth, but it should be acceptable and will spare your motor and good blade the task of all the bull work. The Leitz 24T, DeWalt DW7124TK, or Freud LU87 are good choices.

        The links below will not only give you more detail on a blade choice, but there's some good info about differences in blades interspursed.

        http://www.epinions.com/content_226312687236
        http://www.epinions.com/content_145552674436
        http://www.epinions.com/content_185638293124
        Last edited by hewood; 09-25-2006, 08:51 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Forrest WWII. Expensive but worth it. I use the combo blade and it rips better than many rip blades I've had.
          www.TheWoodCellar.com

          Comment


          • #6
            As long as the cost isn't taking food off the table, you won't regret getting a great blade like the WWII. $80 online.

            Comment


            • #7
              Just a plug for Freud... I had an issue with a carbide tooth coming off and asked them what I did to cause that, give that I had only cut new wood and had not dropped the blade. They asked me to return it and shortly thereafter decided to replace it for me. Very nice folks to deal with on both sides of the deal (start and finish).
              Later,
              Chiz

              Comment


              • #8
                The Freud LU86R010 "Industrial" 40T is a nice all purpose blade for ~ $35 from one of their upper lines. There's not alot else in that price range as good IMO.

                Forrest is top end, but will set you back over $80.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for all the input.
                  I have decided to try the Freud LU84R010.
                  So far I like it alot. Real nice cuts. I just made some ZCI's and will see
                  if the cuts are even better. I a sure it will.
                  Kurt
                  (Cool! I still have 10 fingers!)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bird dog
                    Thanks for all the input.
                    I have decided to try the Freud LU84R010.
                    So far I like it alot. Real nice cuts. I just made some ZCI's and will see
                    if the cuts are even better. I a sure it will.

                    I'm puzzled...you're new to this so you do the wise thing and ask for advice so as not to make an expensive mistake. Several people were kind enough to offer great options, then you go and buy a blade that no one suggested. You ended up with a good blade, but you could have gotten a great blade for the same price that would have been a better match to your saw....(shakes head) ...."rookies..." . My point is that you could have ended up with a real clunker by doing that, but fortunately you didn't.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bench Dog,
                      I appreciate your honesty. Not sure if I like the tone.
                      However, I did not just deregard the recommendations made by the other forum members.
                      I actually based my final decision on the blade selection utility on the Freud
                      website, speaking to a couple of the guys at our local Rockler store, and other means of research. I feel that my final selection made was a sound one. I needed a quality combination blade that would cut multiple materials with varying thickness, leave a clean edge and performs well with my saw, etc.. That is exactly what I got and I am extremely pleased with it's quality and performance. At this time I could not justify the cost of a WWII for my current schedule of projects.
                      Rookie or not, it was an informed decision.
                      Kurt
                      (Cool! I still have 10 fingers!)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Didn't mean to impart a tone, apologies if taken that way. No one's ever obligated to follow the advice given...I was just curious about how and why you came to the decision you did. Enjoy!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          More Blade Questions

                          Lots of good opinions regarding the Table Saw blade, I will probably go the Forrest WWII route. What would be the recommendation for a 12" compound miter saw that is going to be used for softwood & hardwood trim and as a chop saw for hardwood (qtr wh oak)?
                          JC

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ski John
                            Lots of good opinions regarding the Table Saw blade, I will probably go the Forrest WWII route. What would be the recommendation for a 12" compound miter saw that is going to be used for softwood & hardwood trim and as a chop saw for hardwood (qtr wh oak)?
                            Forrest Chopmaster or Freud LU85R012 would be among the top choices in my book. Also the DeWalt DW7649 is a solid performer that's usually priced reasonably.

                            Comment

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