Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
110V 220 V step down Q Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 110V 220 V step down Q

    Hey everybody,
    It's my first time here and the reason for it is I need info - and hard to find info too.
    I am relocating to New Zealand and want to take all my (RIDGID) electrical tools with me. Ridgid don't have 220 V replacement motors (I alreay checked with the online service technicians)
    My question is:
    1) can I use a step down voltage converter/transformer that will step down voltage from 240V to 110 V?
    2) My tools are 110V, 15A, 60Hz. In New Zealand they have 240V 50Hz. What is Hz and how will this effect my tools?
    3) The voltage converters/transformers you get vary in size from 100 Watts to 1500 Watts. I cannot find the wattage of my tools on the spec sheets nowhere. What is the wattage and what size converter should I get?
    4) Does anybody have any recommendations or more info and advise regarding this and for a good quality converter?
    The tools concerned are:
    R3200 Circular saw
    MS1250LZ Compound Miter Saw
    MS1290LZ Sliding Compound Miter
    TS2400LS Table Saw
    I love my tools and cannot go without them. Cost of replacement Down Under is very expensive.
    Hope to hear from you all soon
    PC

  • #2
    Originally posted by pcnservices
    Hey everybody,
    It's my first time here and the reason for it is I need info - and hard to find info too.
    I am relocating to New Zealand and want to take all my (RIDGID) electrical tools with me. Ridgid don't have 220 V replacement motors (I alreay checked with the online service technicians)
    My question is:
    1) can I use a step down voltage converter/transformer that will step down voltage from 240V to 110 V? yes
    2) My tools are 110V, 15A, 60Hz. In New Zealand they have 240V 50Hz. What is Hz and how will this effect my tools? hz. is also known as cycles. it's the amount of times the voltage goes from a pos. to negative wave. 60 hz. does this 60 times a second and 50 hz. does this 50 times a second. i think it will slow down the tool slightly.
    3) The voltage converters/transformers you get vary in size from 100 Watts to 1500 Watts. I cannot find the wattage of my tools on the spec sheets nowhere. What is the wattage and what size converter should I get? watts are equal to volts times amps. so 1 amp equals 110 watts. 10 amps is 1100 watts. 15amps is 1650 watts. we have 120 volts here. so i use 1 amp equals 120 watts.

    4) Does anybody have any recommendations or more info and advise regarding this and for a good quality converter?
    The tools concerned are:
    R3200 Circular saw
    MS1250LZ Compound Miter Saw
    MS1290LZ Sliding Compound Miter
    TS2400LS Table Saw your table saw should be able to convert to 240 volts
    I love my tools and cannot go without them. Cost of replacement Down Under is very expensive.
    Hope to hear from you all soon
    PC
    i would think that these tools are also made for other countries and that the motors do come in 240 volt 50 cycles. replacing your motors to the 240 volt ones would be more costly than it's worth. why not sell yours and purchase some from ebay in a foreign market?

    i see foreign made washer dryers that are made for 240 volt and work here just fine.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Taking your 120V tools to NZ may not be that practical. For Voltage correction you will need a transformer, and it will need to be a fairly heavy duty transformer. (Solid state voltage changes are not the way to go.) The Wattage rating will need to be comfortably greater than the highest rating on any of the tools you may use with it. Most of the tool ratings (amps) are not peak or truly heavy load ratings. A circular saw with a 10 amp rating may easily draw 50% more current (15 amps) when under heavy load. Transformers have some over current capacity, but unlike your saw, they don't cool off very quickly, so the next heavy cut will just keep the transformer's temperature climbing. High temperature will lower the life of the transformer, and if it isn't a heavy duty rated one that life may become very short. While working in Korea, I and some friends ran into this same problem. The lightweight transformers didn't last and the heavy duty ones were heavy and expensive.

      The difference between 50 and 60 Hz will not be important for tools such as the circular saw, with a universal type of motor. If you were taking a TS3650, with an induction motor, then there would be an impact. The motor would run about 17% slower and produce about 17% less power (e.g. run at 3,000 rpm rather than 3600 rpm with 60 Hz). I don't know if the miter saws have universal motors (brushs) or induction motors (no brushs). The TS2400 has a universal type of motor, but it also has an electronic soft start circuit which may have problems with the 50 Hz power. It can not be rewired to run on 220 V.

      You could plug a universal motor tool into the 220 V and it will run, but at about twice the speed. Probably would be quite exciting for a few seconds.:eek

      I would suggest selling you present set of power tools and buying 220 V versions, if the stay is going to be long. If the stay will be short consider storing them here for your return. Check around (internet) there may be some distributors in the US that also handle 220 V, 50 Hz tools at more reasonable prices than in NZ. I do remember tool prices in England kept me from buying any there, but then I had a desk job.

      Enjoy you time in NZ.
      Dick

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks Dick and Rick, I don't really understand how these electrical motors and stuff works. Your replies answers most of the concerns I had. See I don't want to make a long term move with my tools and have a short life out of it or ruin it due to the voltage changes. Then I could just as well sell it here and replace it down under. However, it is sad becuase my tools are fairly new and well taken care of and your not gonna get for it what it's worth. Replacing them down under is very expensive compared to here in the USA.
        PC

        Comment

        Working...
        X