Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Woodworking bench

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    My Hide-a-Way Bench

    Before I took over the garage in earnest, I had to have a sturdy bench that could be removed to allow the car in. I have since reinforced the top and legs since it is now essentially permanent. The top overhang comes in very handy for clamping. Don't be alarmed by its flimsy appearence....I have had many hundreds of pounds of lumber stacked on it with nary a quiver.
    Attached Files
    “Make yourself an honest man, and then you may be sure that there is one less scoundrel in the world.” —Thomas Carlyle

    Comment


    • #17
      Z,

      Looks like a pretty cool hide-away table that would support quite a lot of weight for sure.

      Comment


      • #18
        Here is a link to my work bench

        http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/woodwo...utah/my_photos

        The top was made from a solid core door from lowes, covered with maple hardwood flooring.

        Comment


        • #19
          Plans

          Originally posted by lefty View Post
          Here are a couple of pictures of my bench built from plans in the November 2006 issue of Wood magazine. I cut the size down from 36"x72" to 30"x60"
          The bench looks nice. I looked in the Nov 2006 Wood issue but did not see the plans. What page are they on, or do you have to order them for somewhere?

          Comment


          • #20
            A & P. Check this link. A lot of good info, including making a bench from a slab and making the square dog holes :

            http://pages.friendlycity.net/~krucker/Bench/index.htm

            Hope this helps

            Go
            Practicing at practical wood working

            Comment


            • #21
              Thanks Gofor I skimmed over that once before I will give it a much closer read. Again, Thanks

              Comment


              • #22
                Hey Gofor?

                Hey Gofor,
                Is that cardboard carpet/sheetgoods tubes from the center of rolls I see in your shops pics DC system? and are they working, seems like they would cause alot of resistance?

                Comment


                • #23
                  Not my shop!! I work out of a 2-car garage (that has actually seen a vehicle in it a couple of times) and am currently using a 6 hp Ridgid vac for dust collection. Just moved here about a year ago and have been too busy with honey-dos and in-law support projects to even finish plans for a dedicated shop. Hope to have one in a year or two. LOL
                  A good woodworking bench is one of my next projects, so I too have been deciding on a design. The link I posted seemed to somewhat match what you are starting with as for materials and also addresses making the square bench dog holes with the 88 degree angle.
                  One thing he doesn't make clear is that the angle and the relief slot are toward the direction of force, so on the table they are toward the vice, and on the vice they are toward the table. If you don't want to split that maple top to cut the slots for the dogs, you will need to make a drill jig to get the exact angle, and square up the holes with a SHARP chisel. Beings you already have the dogs, you can test fit them as you go. If you do split the top, you only have to dado the full dog slot in one side and let the flat surface of the other be the fourth side. you can cut the recess for the head with a router or with a chisel.
                  If the top was indeed a butcher table, it could have been treated with mineral oil. Naptha would be the best solvent to remove it before finishing or gluing it. Mineral oil and naptha have the same base (by-products of gasoline distillation) and the thinner grades of mineral oil are reduced with naptha.
                  By the way, Woodcraft has some quick-release clamps in their catalogue, but don't know if they are the old Veritas design (your request on another thread).
                  For glue, Titebond III will give a strong weather/solvent resistant joint and allow the longer assembly time needed for glue-ups as large as a table top. IMHO, gorilla glue will set up way too quickly. Titebond 1 would give the assembly time, but may fail if you get it wet when using water-stones/wet dry paper when sharpening tools. Titebond II won't give much assembly time for the top, but should work okay for the smaller glue-ups. If you have a good glue surface, biscuits or dowels will not increase the strength of the joint much, but will make alignment a lot easier and help keep the top surface even during clamping.

                  My $.02

                  Go
                  Practicing at practical wood working

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    OH JEEZ!
                    Sorry Gofor, lol I saw GATOR's shop pic (in the shop pics post), darn thought it was yours , OK, SAME question Gator as above^ ? lol

                    Thanks Gofor those are some good ideas and i'll make sure to use the Titebond 3 as you said,was at Rockler tonight talking to the guys there as I was buying MORE stuff, god I can never leave there empty handed, got the JET 12-piece Framing clamp set, was already off sale and back to $150.00 but he said I could still get it for the $99.00 price, I would have waited otherwise. Got myself one of those straight edge clamps too, the real LONG one so I can line it up and rough cut plywood sheets think it can clamp up to 99 inches, got it for the just off sale sale price too. lol Heck I spend enough there and he knows it. A few other items too. Anyways one guy there suggested using a fostner bit cut the smaller hole at the 8 degrees all the way through, then take the larger size needed for the square dogs top part and drill it to that depth, then use a corner chisel to clean em up to square. Your idea of splitting it and only routing the one side is good, Norn IIRC cut them on both sides thats why I was thinking i'd have to cut 1/2&1/2. Looks like I'll be doing some PRACTICE ones FIRST on one of the 3 ft. slab pieces I have as tests on which way works best for me . Thanks for the ideas, I'll look at Woodcrats site again all I noticed were quick release front vises not a quich release Tail vise, but I will relook .
                    Thanks for all the help, Gofor.
                    OH wow, ummm the top is only 1 3/4 inches thick, I think i'll need to cut up one of the 3 footers to add more depth were the dog holes will go. Long say 8 inch wide strips for more meat to give them a 3 1/2 inch thickness, darn wish I kept that 6 footer and just sandwiched them both together and made a 6 foot long bench. So MANY decisions to make! Scares me. lol Feel free to add more input, we may get our benches made one day! lol I've only had the slabs 6 years ,lol
                    Thanks.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Well....I finally finished my workbench (Rock Solid Plywood Bench). And if I do say so myself, it came out pretty darn good! Now the better half has all sorts of projects lined up for me. There's just no rest for the weary! Can't really complain though. I have been allowed to buy more woodworking machinery (Rikon 14in bandsaw and a Rikon 6in jointer). I guess Christmas came early this year! I'll have to put a red bow on the new tools!
                      Everyone thinks there problems are more important than yours!

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by lefty View Post
                        Here are a couple of pictures of my bench built from plans in the November 2006 issue of Wood magazine. I cut the size down from 36"x72" to 30"x60"
                        Lefty - I've had plans for a workbench that looks just like that that I downloaded from WoodplansOnline. The plans call for a manufactured top - what did you use?

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X