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  • 3rd. Vacuum

    Why did you change the filter in your new wet/dry with blower vacuum. I have had the 16 gal. vac for 13 years, and a 6 gal. for 8 years, With only one extra filter. Now you have went and changed that to where I need to buy an other filter for my new 16 gal. vacuum, so I can not switch them out with each other. What you had was great. Now it looks like your going cheap. Pushing the filter on with that rubber has me guessing if it will stay on. I guess, when you have a good product, you might as well mess it up. Customer with 3 Ridgid vacuums. Won't buy another. You have already got my money. Won't recommend.
    Starts
    08-10-2018
    Ends
    09-09-2018
    Location
    America

  • #2
    Maybe Ridgid thought it would be a good idea... who knows. Anyway the new style filters will work with an older vacum. We have a few newer Ridgid w/d vacs at work and the filters don't give us any trouble. But I could see if you load them up with rock dust, get it wet, then jar the vac around it might then fall off. So I would agree, it's a bit annoying to change a good design to one than less robust. So now instead of set it and forget it you feel you need to pay more attention to it and less attention to your work.

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    • #3
      It's like almost everything that is made here in the U.S. or using U.S. management... it's all about making it cheaper and with less parts. It's rarely a matter of making it really good, as much as it is making it good enough! Most of our engineering and marketing is focused on the bottom line and to always maximize profits for the upper management; and when the product falls out of favor, well... that's usually blamed on other things. Simple and very short-sighted.

      CWS

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      • BadgerDave
        BadgerDave commented
        Editing a comment
        Yep, all that is just a byproduct of our one and done throw away approach to almost everything we now purchase. Now, who is responsible for that happening could be debated to death as I feel the blame could be spread far and wide.

    • #4
      Customers will ultimately drive the design. For most uses I think the new design is adequate despite the change. For more demanding customers or professionals like us where we use them to suck up large amount of water, mud, dirt and sand over uneven terrain or getting moved often or manhandled roughly, once we start haveing problems we find a way to work around it. If that can't be easily done you start looking at another product.

      I suppose as shareholders we like our stocks to be profitable I wonder what in reality this design change ended up saving, a few cents? I think most if not all of us would gladly pay it to return to the old design.

      Other that this design blunder I'm satisfied with Ridgid w/d vac performance.
      Last edited by Mightyservant; 08-11-2018, 01:50 PM.

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      • #5
        I?ve never had one fall off with the new design, no nut and cap to lose, and the filters from the new style work on the old vacuums. Unfortunately, the old ones don?t work on the new setup, but who cares, not like you hold on to them forever.

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        • #6
          Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
          It's like almost everything that is made here in the U.S. or using U.S. management... it's all about making it cheaper and with less parts. It's rarely a matter of making it really good, as much as it is making it good enough! Most of our engineering and marketing is focused on the bottom line and to always maximize profits for the upper management; and when the product falls out of favor, well... that's usually blamed on other things. Simple and very short-sighted.

          CWS
          They can't compete with the Festool or Fein HEPA vacs. PC makes or used to make a good HEPA vac for drywall sanding, don't know if it's still available.

          If you're into drywall sanding the Festool Planex system is one of the best out there I think. I like their sanders and vacs over any other as far as performance and features. New this year is BT remote control of the vac. So now your cordless tools can tell the vac when to turn on. There is also a remote you can attach to the end of the hose and just push a button right at the toll without having to walk back to the vac to start or stop it. The Autoclean model vacs keep the filter clear for maximum suction. These are no compromise tools and not cheap, but their performance surpasses anything on the market.

          I've had my Festool CT36 for close to 10 years now and it's still going strong. I use it with my track saws, sanding, routing, and general clean up. Bought the FT after searching for something from RIDGID and other US brands and finding nothing that met my requirements. Paid close to $500 for the CT36. Yeah, I know, probably 6 times what most are willing to pay for a vac but it's more than a cheapo shop vac, it's a dust extraction system and nothing escapes it. I have used my DeWalt track saw in the house and you would think that will make a mess. But no, you couldn't find any sawdust except at the first inch of the cut. Once the saw was into the wood dust extraction was 99.99%.

          You can get easy-to-empty long life bags that are good for something like 400 times, or get the Oneida Ultimate Dust Deputy or Festools own new dust collector accessory which works like the Dust Deputy.

          Makita and Hilti make good vacs too. Makita has a cordless (dual 18v batteries) that is getting good reviews. And where is RIDGID ? Hiding in a cloud of dust I guess. I suggested here years ago that they bring out a HEPA vac that your could plug your tool into like the PC or Festool vacs.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XlISr2dISw

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3OTFdvp000

          Peter Parfitt did a nice review a few years ago.
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXFcnJ_LUvk
          "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

          https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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          • #7
            No doubt, the companies that you mention are the best. But I think they are rare too. I have to admit to being a bit tainted in my opinions sometime, as I've seen an awful lot of just cheap stuff being made and too often feeling disappointment as to why manufacturers doing the things they do. It most always comes down to cost and return on investment. Not that I expect any company to just give things away, but I think we all have to admit to similar thoughts.

            I like my Ridgid shop vacs, especially the two older 12 gallon units. I bought a small (9-Gal I think) a couple of years ago, and it is just not the same as quality, though it works pretty well. I've not had to replace the filters on any of them, but I did want new filter a couple of years ago and found it to be one of the new design. I asked about it in the store and got no answer worth anything... so I simply didn't buy it and am still using the two originals that I bought and a HEPA for fine dust. They're all pretty durable and I've rinsed them a few times. Fortunately I have a compressor and can just blow them clean from the inside, after I remove the heavier stuff with a brush.

            Festool products are pretty intriguing and I must admit that I've never heard a single complaint about them, or Hilti... but I must admit I've never seen either in the field, so to speak. I just can't justify that kind of cost in my head though. But of course, that flys in the face of my questioning of why we aren't making better products... we do, but at some pretty hefty prices!

            Guess I shouldn't complain about it.

            CWS

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            • #8
              We use dust extractors for drilling anchors but we also have to use wet dry vacums to control water during valve replacements or underground repairs as well as general cleanup. Your often picking up all sorts of foreign material from rat feces to rocks and nothing beats a Ridgid w/d vac for that. So far the newer design seems ok if you use the lightweight stock filters.

              i use a heavier aftermarket friction fit filter for my own vac and it popped off after it fell off a table but it wasn't too shocked. I use a disposable bag in the vac and vortex filter. Between all that, a dust mask and negative air it keeps the dust way down when I'm working in a room.

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              • #9
                True, a wet/dry vac is a different animal, and a Festool or similar dust extractor from another brand wouldn't stand a chance if used for those tasks, but that's not what they are designed for, just as a wet/dry vac is not the best at dust extraction but many times people want try to put their W/D vac in a dust extraction role and it's not a good fit. That's why RIDGID should make a dust extractor to sell alongside their W/D vacs.

                If you've never seen a Festool or Hilti tool in the field I don't know what to tell you. I rarely been on a job where Hilti didn't have a the majority of the concrete drilling and core drilling tools on site. Worked all types of construction over 40 years but only a few residential jobs. Most were in industrial, commercial, medical, or educational facilities. I would bet out of all those projects (over 50) I used a non-Hilti concrete drill less than a dozen times, and those times the tool of choice was Bosch or Milwaukee.
                "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

                https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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